HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Flash Point by Nancy Kress
Loading...

Flash Point (edition 2012)

by Nancy Kress

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
554214,390 (3.44)1
Member:booktwirps
Title:Flash Point
Authors:Nancy Kress
Info:Viking Juvenile (2012), Hardcover, 400 pages
Collections:November 2012
Rating:***
Tags:None

Work details

Flash Point by Nancy Kress

None

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 1 mention

Showing 4 of 4
Title: Flash Point
Author: Nancy Kress
Ratings: 1 Star

I normally try to complete all the books I start no matter how bad it may be. When I stumbled onto this book at Barnes & Noble, the summary inside the book flap seemed intriguing enough to warrant a read.

I was so wrong.

I stopped reading as soon as I finished chapter 9. That was all I could have stomached. The story that I was reading wasn't as interesting as the story that was promised to me on the book flap. It was dull and fell short of anything promising. The characters were flat too and pretty stereotypical.

The surprising thing is that Nancy Kress is well-known for her writing how-to books (especially the characters guides). I expected much more from her and was disappointed at how unrelatable and how forgettable the characters are in this book.

I don't like to tell people not to read anything but this book is not worth your time. I struggled to continue after chapter five thinking that it was going to get better once the world and characters are established. I was so wrong. ( )
1 vote ChristineySong | Aug 1, 2013 |
Predictable and inconsistent. A lot of loose ends. The whole book felt sloppily written. A much tighter, more compelling story could have been written in half the pages. ( )
  gypsycab79 | Jun 25, 2013 |
In Flash Point the world is different after "the Collapse" destroys the economy (think The Depression times 100). There are only two classes of people. The extremely rich and the extremely poor, the middle class has been eradicated. Children are now deemed adults at the age of 16 because there were so many orphans the country needed to figure out a way to not be responsible for the kids. Amy is 16 and is struggling to support her sick grandmother and younger sister. Amy is working as a waitress when an she gets an opportunity to interview for a new tv show. Which she knows nothing about, except that it pays MUCH better than her current job. Amy gets one of the roles on the reality show. She now has medical care for her sick grandmother and enough money to pay the rent, finally.
When Amy leaves the studio to go home, she finds a man bleeding on the ground. When she stops to help him, he jumps up and attacks her. Come to find out the same thing happened to everyone who got on the show, and the viewers need to guess correctly how a certain person reacted to win the grand prize. Which is 5 million dollars. The ratings go crazy and they are all instantly famous. Only problem is with each episode its getting more and more dangerous and the kids have no idea when they are apart of a scenario or if it's a real life situation they are dealing with.
I really liked the "cast" of the reality show an how all their different personalities shown through. No one got lost in this book, even though Amy was the main character. It's definitely a book that grabs your attention and doesn't let go ( )
1 vote marybeth1018 | Dec 16, 2012 |
In the near future — a future that is a little too close, and a little too plausible for comfort — the economy has collapsed and the US as we know it is starting to change. There is no more middle class. You are either well off, or you’re not, and those that are not really struggle to keep their heads above water. Amy, the main character, is doing everything she can to take care of her ailing grandmother and her kid sister, but things aren’t looking good for them. They have no insurance, and can’t afford her grandmother’s medical bills. When the opportunity to appear on a reality game show presents itself, Amy sees an easy way out. Sure, it’s risky, but should she win, the money would ease her worries significantly, pay for her grandmother’s healthcare costs and allow Amy to return to school. The idea behind the show is that the contestants will be placed in dangerous situations and the television audience votes on how they think the contestants will fare. For each successful mission the contestants complete, there’s a hefty cash reward. But when ratings begin to slip, the producers grow desperate and increase the danger level for the challenges. Amy wants desperately to win so she can provide for her family, but how far is she really willing to go?

I have very mixed feelings about this one. On one hand, I really liked the premise, and the fact that we have come so close to similar economic ruin made it all the more creepy. Also, America’s obsession with reality TV made it even more realistic. On the other hand, there were several things that I felt fell flat.

My biggest problem was that I didn’t feel like I had a complete grasp on the world. I got the politics and the economic/class divide, but I would have liked a little more depth and consistency in those areas. For instance, why did so many of the lower class people have the latest and greatest gadgets? Wouldn’t they be too poor to afford them? I guess I just needed more of the why to balance out the what if you will. I also would have liked a little more variation on the game itself. After a while the challenges all felt repetitive. It was like there was a formula, and they didn’t hold an element of shock or surprise after a while.

I did like Amy a lot, and wanted her to succeed. Unfortunately, none of the other characters did it for me. I could see where the author was going with them — trying to break stereotypical molds by bringing out the “true” person inside when faced with a dire situation — but I would have liked a little more depth. They all just felt a little flat to me.

This isn’t a bad read and even though it did seem to drag in spots, I was still able to enjoy it. I was just hoping for more of a punch and a few more twists. It didn’t build the way I hoped it would. ( )
1 vote booktwirps | Nov 5, 2012 |
Showing 4 of 4
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0670012475, Hardcover)

Reality TV meets a chillingly realistic version of America--and the fame game is on!

Amy had dreams of going to college, until the Collapse destroyed the economy and her future. Now she is desperate for any job that will help support her terminally ill grandmother and rebellious younger sister. When she finds herself in the running for a slot on a new reality TV show, she signs on the dotted line, despite her misgivings. And she's right to have them. TLN's Who Knows People, Baby--You? has an irresistible premise: correctly predict what the teenage cast will do in a crisis and win millions. But the network has pulled strings to make it work, using everything from 24/7 hidden cameras to life-threatening technology to flat-out rigging. Worse, every time the ratings slip, TLN ups the ante. Soon Amy is fighting for her life--on and off camera.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:31:37 -0400)

Amy had dreams of going to college, until the Collapse destroyed the economy and her future. Now she is desperate for any job that will help support her terminally ill grandmother and rebellious younger sister. When she finds herself in the running for a slot on a new reality TV show, she signs on the dotted line, despite her misgivings. And she's right to have them. TLN's "Who Knows People, Baby--You?" has an irresistible premise: correctly predict what the teenage cast will do in a crisis and win millions. But the network has pulled strings to make it work, using everything from 24/7 hidden cameras to life-threatening technology to flat-out rigging. Worse, every time the ratings slip, TLN ups the ante. Soon Amy is fighting for her life--on and off camera.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
10 wanted1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.44)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 2
3.5
4 3
4.5
5 2

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 91,509,996 books! | Top bar: Always visible