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The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in…
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The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven (1993)

by Sherman Alexie

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Showing 1-5 of 48 (next | show all)
It was nice reading this after seeing him speak. Reading it sounded like him telling me all the stories. I ended up watching Smoke Signals again to take a closer look at how he wove the stories into the screenplay. It can't be easy to adapt a collection of short stories into a movie. At least many of these stories are connected so that probably helped. ( )
  S.D. | Apr 4, 2014 |
  jll1976 | Mar 24, 2014 |
This book wasn't bad, just a little hard to take sometimes. It is a collection of short stories about, mostly, boys and men on the Spokane Indian Reservation. There are tales about growing up, surviving alcoholism, not surviving alcoholism, basketball and fighting. The most heartbreaking story for me was The Trial of Thomas Builds-the-Fire. Thomas is a born story teller, he has been telling stories for years. Then one day he stopped telling stories, at least out loud. What happened next was shocking and heartbreaking.

I liked the first book I read by Alexie but it was in novel format. If I read any more by him I'll stick with the novels.

My biggest problem of this collection was that there seemed to be some common threads but it was hard to track them and I often lost track of which named character went with which stories. ( )
  bookswoman | Dec 12, 2013 |
Many of the stories are beautiful and a few hauntingly so. Unfortunately, as with all short story collections, some of the stories aren't all that good. Still, the number of good ones is larger than those that aren't, and there are a few that are more than just good. Recommended. ( )
  JWarren42 | Oct 10, 2013 |
This book was assigned to all Freshmen to be read the summer before Freshman year and to be discussed in Freshman seminars--we called it First Year Seminars, FYSEM for short.

It's been eight years since I last picked it up. All I remember is that I enjoyed the aloof writing and the youthful narration and the displaced characters. There was an honesty to the short stories/long prose that was different, realistic, sarcastic, and funnier than anything I'd read up to that point. This was the book that made me interested in contemporary fiction. I especially like the foreword and how Alexie discussed his road to writing and how he's now finally "middle-class," which is an achievement for a Native American where he's from.

brb, I'm gonna go and dig out my old tattered copy. ( )
  1stavenue | Sep 20, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 48 (next | show all)
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For Bob, Dick, Mark, and Ron
For Adrian, Joy, Leslie, Simon,
and all those Native writerswhose words an music
have made mine possible
First words
Although it was winter, the nearest ocean was four hundred miles away, and the Tribal Weatherman asleep because of boredom, a hurricane dropped from the sky in 1976 and fell so hard on the Spokane Indian Reservation that it knocked Victor from bed and his latest nightmare.
Quotations
Still, Indians have a way of surviving. But it's almost like Indians can easily survive the big stuff. Mass murder, loss of language and land rights. It's the small things that hurt the most. The white waitresses who wouldn't take an order, Tonto, and the Washington Redskins. ("The Only Traffic Signal on the Reservation Doesn't Flash Red Any More")
...James says he knows more. He says the earth is our grandmother and that technology has become our mother and that they both hate each other. (Jesus Christ's Half Brother is Alive and Well on the Spokane Indian reservation")
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0802141676, Paperback)


When it was first published in 1993, The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven established Sherman Alexie as a stunning new talent of American letters. The basis for the award-winning movie Smoke Signals, it remains one of his most beloved and widely praised books. In this darkly comic collection, Alexie brilliantly weaves memory, fantasy, and stark realism to paint a complex, grimly ironic portrait of life in and around the Spokane Indian Reservation. These twenty-two interlinked tales are narrated by characters raised on humiliation and government-issue cheese, and yet are filled with passion and affection, myth and dream. Against a backdrop of alcohol, car accidents, laughter, and basketball, Alexie depicts the distances between Indians and whites, reservation Indians and urban Indians, men and women, and, most poetically, modern Indians and the traditions of the past.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:43:46 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

Offers a fictional portrait of the characters, language, traditions, and daily life of those living on the Spokane Indian Reservation.

» see all 3 descriptions

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