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The Storyteller by Jodi Picoult
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The Storyteller (edition 2013)

by Jodi Picoult

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2,3191304,081 (4.08)54
Member:allyflower15
Title:The Storyteller
Authors:Jodi Picoult
Info:Atria/Emily Bestler Books (2013), Paperback, 480 pages
Collections:Wishlist
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The Storyteller by Jodi Picoult

  1. 10
    The Reader by Bernhard Schlink (Cecilturtle)
  2. 00
    Not Me by Michael Lavigne (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: These thought-provoking novels examine the atrocious activities and difficult decisions made during the Holocaust, the legacy of World War II, and the links between identity and humanity.
  3. 00
    The Girl You Left Behind by Jojo Moyes (Iudita)
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» See also 54 mentions

English (128)  Dutch (2)  All languages (130)
Showing 1-5 of 128 (next | show all)
Emotionally draining, yet powerful story. This was a very human, personal account of the Holocaust, survival, and forgiveness. I highly recommend this book. ( )
  rmarcin | Jan 22, 2019 |
Love historical fiction about WWII. Narration of more than one person's view is always a plus. ( )
  michelynn2016 | Nov 20, 2018 |
Sage Singer, a baker who chooses to work at night and alone, is both physically and emotionally scarred. She befriends an elderly gentleman from her community who is also suffering emotionally as a result of his past as a Nazi officer in the SS during World War II. He asks her to forgive him and then to help him to kill himself. From there, the story grabs the reader and doesn't let go until the end. Historically, the novel relates the horrors of the holocaust. But more importantly, it becomes a study of forgiveness. The stories within a story are well presented and Picoult again does an excellent job of addressing another important topic in this, her latest novel.

Above is the review I completed after my first reading of this book. The Storyteller is our book club pick for the month of June and so I have just finished a second reading of the novel. I can only add that I was once more both saddened and intrigued by the characters and their stories as they recount the horrific events that took place during World War II. ( )
  Rdglady | Nov 20, 2018 |
Sage Singer, a baker who chooses to work at night and alone, is both physically and emotionally scarred. She befriends an elderly gentleman from her community who is also suffering emotionally as a result of his past as a Nazi officer in the SS during World War II. He asks her to forgive him and then to help him to kill himself. From there, the story grabs the reader and doesn't let go until the end. Historically, the novel relates the horrors of the holocaust. But more importantly, it becomes a study of forgiveness. The stories within a story are well presented and Picoult again does an excellent job of addressing another important topic in this, her latest novel. ( )
  Rdglady | Nov 20, 2018 |
I have read several books on the Holocaust, I think most of them were written by survivors but this historical fiction one that centered on a few characters Jodi Picoult's book goes back and forth through time from the start of the Hitler's Youth to modern day. Having watched a documentary about about Hitler' Youth, all of it rang completely true. But Jodi Picout brings the story of two brothers growing up in it home.

In current times, Sage carried deep inside her the emotional scars of the day that her mother died. Her face is disfigured on one side. so she stays away mirrors and most people, even her family. She prefers the solitude of the hours where she works in bakery in the back. Sage meets a man in his nineties and starts to know him as a friend, chatting with him when he comes to bakery. she had been having a long affair with the married funeral director who she met at her mother's funeral.

Except for the ex-nun who is the owner of the bakery, nothing much exists for her in her self-imposed isolation. This story gets more complicated when her new friend reveals that he was a Nazi. Sage's grandmother is a Holocaust survivor. This very intense story, especially when Sage's grandmother starts to tell of her life as a young girl and then in the concentration camp had me with tears streaming down my face. After the whole tale was, I could easily understand why the story was too painful to tell her family and why she wanted to be free to live in the present instead of the horrible past. I have met a survivor myself and his family always said that he never talked about his experience. For me, the Holocaust should never happen again but also it is so horrible that I can understand why survivors want to shut the door on the past forever.

Forgiveness, what does it mean and who can give it? Love of a friend so deep that you feel like your heart has been torn out when the friend dies. These are just a few things deeply explored in this book

I highly recommend this book for an understanding of how the Holocaust could happen and the deep of sorrow that the families and survivors feel. There is so much more to move you deeply and for you to think about in this. I just ask that you either read it or listen to it. ( )
  Carolee888 | Oct 13, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 128 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jodi Picoultprimary authorall editionscalculated
Ardon, AyalCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lee, Jeanne M.Cover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
For my mother, Jane Picoult, because you taught me there is nothing more important than family. And because after twenty years, its your turn again.
First words
My father trusted me with the details of his death.
Quotations
There are all sorts of losses people suffer—from the small to the large. You can lose your car keys, your glasses, your virginity. You can lose your head, you can lose your heart, you can lose your mind. You can relinquish your home to move into assisted living, or have a child move overseas, or see a spouse vanish into dementia. Loss is more than just death, and grief is the gray shape-shifter of emotion.
That's the paradox of loss: How can something that's gone weigh us down so much?
But my mother also would have been the first to tell me that good people are good people; religion has nothing to do with it.
I cannot justify why I've picked Josef, a virtual stranger, to reveal myself to. Maybe because loneliness is a mirror, and recognizes itself.
And me: I find myself talking about things that I have long packed up, like a spinster's hope chest.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
Sage Singer, a baker is asked by Josef Weber to make a moral choice. It will make her draw the line between punishment and justice, forgiveness and mercy.
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Sage Singer becomes friends with an old man who's particularly beloved in her community after they strike up a conversation at the bakery where she works. Josef Weber is everyone's favorite retired teacher and Little League coach. One day he asks Sage for a favor: to kill him. Shocked, Sage refuses, but then he tells her he deserves to die. Once he reveals his secret, Sage wonders if he's right. What do you do when evil lives next door? Can someone who's committed a truly heinous act ever redeem themselves with good behavior? Should you offer forgiveness to someone if you aren't the party who was wronged? And most of all--if Sage even considers his request--is it murder, or justice?… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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