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The Girl in the Glass by Susan Meissner
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The Girl in the Glass (edition 2013)

by Susan Meissner

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5314221,808 (4.37)4
Member:journeygirl
Title:The Girl in the Glass
Authors:Susan Meissner
Info:Thorndike Press (2013), Edition: Lrg, Hardcover, 484 pages
Collections:Read, Read but unowned
Rating:
Tags:fiction, italy, florence, art, publishing, father

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The Girl in the Glass by Susan Meissner

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  1. 00
    The Glassblower of Murano by Marina Fiorato (joririchardson)
    joririchardson: Both books involve a young woman escaping romantic tragedy and traveling to Italy, where she has family history.
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Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Margaret has always dreamed of going to Florence, and her dad promised her nonna that he would bring her there someday. At the age of thirty, Meg is still waiting for her father to take that trip, though her parents are long divorced and he isn't known for following through on her promises. While working for a travel publisher, one of the writers in Florence sends Meg some chapters of a book that his neighbor, Sofia, has written. Meg is entranced by the book, in which the woman claims that she is a Medici, and one of her ancestors speaks to her through the art in Florence.

I've liked the two novels I've read by Susan Meissner - The Shape of Mercy and The Girl in the Glass. They're technically Christian fiction, but there's no real message and the Christianity isn't heavy-handed, so I would easily recommend it to people who enjoyed gentle reads and didn't mind a brief mention of God and/or prayer. This story was full of peaks and valleys for me. I enjoyed the writing and descriptions, especially of Florence and its art. I enjoyed the memories of Nora Orsini, the Medici ancestor that Sofia hears, interspersed between chapters purposefully. I had a harder time with some of the plot points that were revealed later in the story, mainly because some revelations stretched my credulity and I personally had a hard time reconciling explanations from the beginning of the book with those revelations at the end. Still, it was a captivating enough story that I want to go visit Florence and read more about Renaissance history and the Medicis. ( )
  bell7 | Apr 2, 2013 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
The Girl in the Glass is a book to be enjoyed slowly and each word savored.

Meg has always wanted to go to Florence, Italy, the city of her grandmother's childhood. Unfortunately, her grandmother passed away before they could go, leaving Meg with an unfulfilled promise.

Now that Meg's older and working in the publishing industry, she still dreams of visiting Florence, but has settled to just talking with and Skyping with one of her authors that lives there.

During one of their conversations, Lorenzo asks her to read a story that one of his neighbors is writing to see if it might be publishable. Meg agrees to read through it, not realizing how much of an impact Sophia's story would make on her life.
Through a series of events, Meg ends up traveling to Florence and meets Lorenzo, his sister, and Sophia, the neighbor across the hall. There, Meg discovers her true self through the lives of her friends.

The Girl in the Glass is an amazing book that I couldn't bear to put down, nor see it end. Words cannot do the book justice because it is one you must experience. The rich weaving of Meg's story with Sophia and Nora Orsini is one that will transform you at the very core of your soul. This book is a MUST read! ( )
  DynamicUno | Mar 29, 2013 |
This is something I have not read before. It was something interesting. It has a few thing and it a bit confusing in the beginning but there are some surprises in the book. You hear to different thing one under the name Nora, and Meg story along with another person. This one got me a bit fun but it keep my attention to a point I did not want to put it down.

This book also talk about a place in Italy. These places are something to learn from along with a surprise for you to find out about someone in the book as well. ( )
  Lindz2012 | Jan 31, 2013 |
I read the girl in the glass by Susan Meissner, in exchange for review from Blogging For Books. The book was published by WaterBrook Press. The book is about MEg, who wants to take a trip to Florence, based on a picture she seen at Grandma house. Her grandma dies and her father is left to take her instead, but he can not be found.

The book is a beautiful book. The imagery is amazing. Meg starts off reminiscing about her grandmother and her grandmother's home. " The red and cream hues, remembered from the paintings on my Italian grandmother's walls" (p. 1). From The Statue of David to the toast-colored stucco to zipping of vespas down the street (p. 1). The book takes place 18 years later after her Nonna dies.

I also love the letters, written in a fancy font, scattered throughout the book.
  staciewyatt | Jan 21, 2013 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I received The Girl in the Glass by Susan Meissner from LT's Early Reviewer program. While I enjoy Susan Meissner's writing and have enjoyed her other books, I was not that intrigued by The Girl in the Glass. The main character, Meg, has waited for years to go to Florence, a city she longs to visit, because her father promised to take her, so she has waited for over a decade. Meg's reasons for not going on her own seem juvenile, and she continues to come across as juvenile throughout the book. However, there are quite a few lyrical moments, and I do like how the author wove the stories of three women together. Overall, I found the book to be a pleasant read, but it was not one of those captivating, cannot put it down, books. I live in Italy, so I enjoyed the aspects of Italian culture, and I think anyone who has loved the city of Florence would relate to the beauty of the city that comes through in this book.
  journeygirl | Dec 13, 2012 |
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Prologue: The sun is setting on my last day in Florence.
Chapter I: When I close my eyes and think of home, I always envision Florence - a place I've never been.
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Book description
Since she was a child, Meg has dreamed of taking a promised trip to Florence, Italy, and being able to finally step into the place captured in a picture at her grandmother’s house. But after her grandmother passes away and it falls to her less-than-reliable father to take her instead, Meg’s long-anticipated travel plans seem permanently on hold.

When her dad finally tells Meg to book the trip, she prays that the experience will heal the fissures left on her life by her parents’ divorce. But when Meg arrives in Florence, her father is nowhere to be found, leaving aspiring memoir-writer Sophia Borelli to introduce Meg to the rich beauty of the ancient city. Sofia claims to be one of the last surviving members of the Medici family and that a long-ago Medici princess, Nora Orsini, communicates with her from within the great masterpieces of the Italian Renaissance.

When Sophia, Meg, and Nora’s stories intersect, their lives will be indelibly changed as they each answer the question: What if renaissance isn’t just a word? What if that’s what happens when you dare to believe that what is isn’t what has to be?
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0307730425, Paperback)

Renaissance is a word with hope infused in every letter.
 
Since she was a child, Meg has dreamed of taking a promised trip to Florence, Italy, and being able to finally step into the place captured in a picture at her grandmother’s house. But after her grandmother passes away and it falls to her less-than-reliable father to take her instead, Meg’s long-anticipated travel plans seem permanently on hold.
 
When her dad finally tells Meg to book the trip, she prays that the experience will heal the fissures left on her life by her parents’ divorce. But when Meg arrives in Florence, her father is nowhere to be found, leaving aspiring memoir-writer Sophia Borelli to introduce Meg to the rich beauty of the ancient city. Sofia claims to be one of the last surviving members of the Medici family and that a long-ago Medici princess, Nora Orsini, communicates with her from within the great masterpieces of the Italian Renaissance.
 
When Sophia, Meg, and Nora’s stories intersect, their lives will be indelibly changed as they each answer the question: What if renaissance isn’t just a word? What if that’s what happens when you dare to believe that what is isn’t what has to be?

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:26:59 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Renaissance is a word with hope infused in every letter. Since she was a child, Meg has dreamed of taking a promised trip to Florence, Italy, and being able to finally step into the place captured in a picture at her grandmother's house. But after her grandmother passes away and it falls to her less-than-reliable father to take her instead, Meg's long-anticipated travel plans seem permanently on hold. When her dad finally tells Meg to book the trip, she prays that the experience will heal the fissures left on her life by her parents' divorce. But when Meg arrives in Florence, her father is nowhere to be found, leaving aspiring memoir-writer Sophia Borelli to introduce Meg to the rich beauty of the ancient city. Sofia claims to be one of the last surviving members of the Medici family and that a long-ago Medici princess, Nora Orsini, communicates with her from within the great masterpieces of the Italian Renaissance. When Sophia, Meg, and Nora's stories intersect, their lives will be indelibly changed as they each answer the question: What if renaissance isn't just a word? What if that's what happens when you dare to believe that what is isn't what has to be?… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 2 descriptions

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