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The 5 Simple Truths of Raising Kids: How to…
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The 5 Simple Truths of Raising Kids: How to Deal with Modern Problems… (edition 2012)

by R. Bradley Snyder

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2316459,532 (3.61)None
Member:mamajoan
Title:The 5 Simple Truths of Raising Kids: How to Deal with Modern Problems Facing Your Tweens and Teens
Authors:R. Bradley Snyder
Info:Demos Health (2012), Paperback, 230 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:nonfic, read in 2012, parenting

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The 5 Simple Truths of Raising Kids: How to Deal with Modern Problems Facing Your Tweens and Teens by R. Bradley Snyder

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This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
It is always nice to read a book like this--one full of common sense packaged in a different way from how I have heard it before. Nothing brand new but good reminders. ( )
  walterqchocobo | Mar 29, 2014 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
The author of 5 Simple Truths of Raising Kids, R. Bradley Snyder, has spent his career as a researcher talking to teens and studying teens’ behavior and has developed a deep understanding of how to parent a teen. He presents his findings with simple, straight forward language and easy to relate to scenarios. The message of the book is that kids are kids, kids are good, and kids need parents, adults, and communities. He presents teen behavior in a way that counters the present day belief that kids are bad. He presents statistics that demonstrate that bullying, abductions, teen violence, and drinking and drug use by adolescents are actually decreasing, not increasing like the media tells us. He addresses the fear that is so prevalent in parents and explains how that fear causes us to distrust adolescents. I cheered Mr. Snyder as I read, wishing that the book was required reading for all parents of teens, teachers, guidance counselors, juvenile justice employees, magistrates, and police officers. The book also offers simple, achievable methods for monitoring kids’ time spent watching television, playing video games, texting, and using social networks. I appreciated reading this book as a parent and will recommend it to all of the parents of teens that I work with professionally. ( )
1 vote joyceBl | Jul 6, 2013 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
The 5 Simple Truths of Raising Kids by R. Bradley Snyder was a quick read that many educators and parents would find quite informative and useful. As a school counselor, I appreciated the main theme of the book which is that all kids are basically good. Often times are jobs as school counselors are spent dealing with problems and issues that come up with the seemingly same ole' students. It is nice to hear validation from a well-educated author that kids are good! Things are not as bad as the media would make them out to be. Snyder provides great advice on dealing with timely issues surrounding the youth of today such as cell phone usage, bullying, television and video games. The recommendations given are easy to apply and extremely helpful to both educators and parents. ( )
  shellyup47 | Mar 7, 2013 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
The 5 simple truths of raising kids are this: Kids are Kids. Kids are Good. Kids need Parents. Kids need Adults. Kids need Communities.

For parents and others who may be shaking their heads at "kids these day," Snyder offers a positive perspective, backed up by statistics, that may be reassuring. I think it'd be a great book to give to a concerned grandparent, for example. Snyder is in marketing, and it shows. As a mental health professional-turned-Mom, I would have preferred a more balanced look at the research. Snyder chose to include the studies that fit in with his personal (pro-television, pro-video games) opinion and ignore pretty much everything else. And I never did figure out the bizarre segment on Dancing With the Stars (p. 54), which reads more like a teen essay than a book for adults, who may or may not be familiar with the TV show or the celebrities that Snyder uses as examples. So, maybe not the best choice for the grandparents, after all. ( )
  Alirambles | Jan 31, 2013 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
This book is an easy read that covers some basic principles on how to relate to kids. The style is straight forward and recommendations balance instilling 'empowerment' and 'accountability'. I think it could be most helpful in providing conversation starters between kids' caretakers to align on the best ways to help the kids experience life. The book does not push 'identical' practices, but rather it could be used to reinforce the damage of 'conflicting' styles/expectations. ( )
  ocho60 | Jan 25, 2013 |
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"The 5 Simple Truths of Raising Kids draws upon the entirety of Brad's research and professional experience. In his career he has surveyed over 100,000 children and adolescents, personally interviewing close to 4,000 in group and one-on-one sessions, and run direct service programs in major cities nationwide. He breaks down barriers between the generations and present tweens and teens as they really are. Brad distills the best information on child development, media use, delinquency and morality into five simple truths that will help parents better understand and appreciate the young people in their lives while providing strategies for addressing everyday concerns in positive and productive ways. Brad doesn't place the danger with kids, rather he thinks the danger lies with the sensationalized media about tweens and teens. The 5 Truths of Raising Kids is based on solid research, but Brad's writing is easy to digest and punctuated with anecdotes from his own experience counseling kids, working within juvenile prisons, and developing television programs and video games. Some of it is funny, most of it is practical, but all of it is important to anyone who cares about kids."-- Publisher.… (more)

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