HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Code of the Woosters (1938)

by P. G. Wodehouse

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Jeeves (6)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3,201532,910 (4.33)154
"They say trouble comes in threes, and Bertie Wooster soon learns why. It all begins when his aunt Dahlia asks him to steal a silver cow creamer illegally obtained by her husband's silver rival. Then comes the telegram from Gussie Fink-Nottle begging Bertie to come to Totleigh Towers to mend the rift between him and his soppy fiancée, Madeline Bassett. To top it all off, Bertie must contend with Roderick Spode, the menacing, black shorts-wearing, amateur dictator. How will Bertie get the cow creamer, stay unengaged from Madeline, and survive Totleigh Tower?"--P. [4] of cover.… (more)
Recently added byMendoLibrary, private library, proudreaders, AnnaBookcritter, mldybkr
Legacy LibrariesAstrid Lindgren
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 154 mentions

English (51)  Dutch (2)  All languages (53)
Showing 1-5 of 51 (next | show all)
2020 reread via full cast audiobook (Martin Jarvis as Jeeves) streamed from LATW website. This (possibly slightly abridged) edition isn't quite as good as the Jonathan Cecil narration but it was still a extremely funny book. A great way to spend a morning :) ( )
  leslie.98 | Jul 18, 2020 |
Wodehouse, P. G. The Code of the Woosters. 1938. Jeeves No. 7. Norton, 2011.
Science fiction author Connie Willis was recently asked to name a few books she likes to reread in these troubled times. One of the books on her list was The Code of the Woosters by P. G. Woodhouse, one of the best of the Jeeves and Bertie Wooster stories. So, naturally, I had to reread it myself. And then I had to dive into YouTube to scare up the Jeeves and Wooster television series, starring a young Hugh Laurie (these days best remembered for playing Dr. House) and Stephen Fry. By now my Wodehouse addiction is well and truly cranked up. Soon I will be striding around the house saying, “What ho!” to all and sundry and dreaming about Donald Trump as Spode harassing Madeleine Bassett and Gussy Fink-Nottle at Mar Lago. May the dog Bartholomew bite him on the ankle. Really, kids, you should read yourself some Wodehouse—it’ll give you sweet comic dreams. ( )
  Tom-e | Jun 17, 2020 |
The crown jewel of the Jeeves and Wooster series. ( )
  therebelprince | Apr 27, 2020 |
9/2/2014: My favorite book, full stop. Perfection.

11/18/2010:Wodehouse is a master of the English language. This novel is laugh-out-loud funny, cutting, insightful, surprising, and the plotting is freakin' amazing. A true masterwork. Turn off cable news or whatever mediocre bombast the twenty-first century is bleating at you, and pick up this treasure of the twentieth. For anyone who delights in the oddities of modern Dutch cow creamers, to asocial newt collectors, to black-shorted Fascists. AMAZING! ( )
  charlyk | Nov 15, 2019 |
Consistently funny and clever throughout. Not perfect, but a great Wodehouse.

> Jeeves was right, I felt. The snail was on the wing and the lark on the thorn — or, rather, the other way round — and God was in His heaven and all right with the world.

> 'Are you ill, sir?' he enquired solicitously. I sank into a c. and passed an agitated h. over the b.

> I hoped he was not going to say 'Ha!' but he did. And as I had not yet mastered the vocal cords sufficiently to be able to reply, that concluded the dialogue sequence for the moment.

> 'It contained an offer to swap the cow-creamer for Anatole, and Tom is seriously considering it!' I stared at her. 'What? Incredulous!' 'Incredible, sir.' 'Thank you, Jeeves. Incredible!'

> I've often wished I had a quid for every time some bird with a perfectly familiar map has come up to me and Hallo-Woostered, and had me gasping for air because I couldn’t put a label to him

> And folding my arms and drawing myself up to my full height, I let him have it. The exact words of my harangue have, I am sorry to say, escaped my memory. It is a pity that there was nobody taking them down in shorthand, for I am not exaggerating when I say that I surpassed myself. Once or twice, when a bit lit at routs and revels, I have spoken with an eloquence which, rightly or wrongly, has won the plaudits of the Drones Club, but I don’t think that I have ever quite reached the level to which I now soared. You could see the stuffing trickling out of old Bassett in great heaping handfuls. ( )
  breic | Aug 23, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 51 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (28 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
P. G. Wodehouseprimary authorall editionscalculated
Cockburn, AlexanderIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
I reached out a hand from under the blankets, and rang the bell for Jeeves.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This book was provisionally titled The Silver Cow before being published as The Code of the Woosters.
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

"They say trouble comes in threes, and Bertie Wooster soon learns why. It all begins when his aunt Dahlia asks him to steal a silver cow creamer illegally obtained by her husband's silver rival. Then comes the telegram from Gussie Fink-Nottle begging Bertie to come to Totleigh Towers to mend the rift between him and his soppy fiancée, Madeline Bassett. To top it all off, Bertie must contend with Roderick Spode, the menacing, black shorts-wearing, amateur dictator. How will Bertie get the cow creamer, stay unengaged from Madeline, and survive Totleigh Tower?"--P. [4] of cover.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Bertie Wooster is in the proverbial soup again. On this occasion, the problem concerns a certain cow-creamer that should have belonged to Uncle Tom, but, with the use of trickery, was purchased by Sir Watkyn Bassett. Aunt Dahlia insists that Bertie steal it back, but Sir Watkyn and his companion Roderick Spode are on to him. To make matters worse, Stephanie Byng also has an ingenious plan to endear her fiancé to her uncle (none other than Sir Watkyn) that entails Bertie stealing the cow-creamer. And she's willing to use blackmail. Damned if he does the deed and damned if he doesn't (or rather beaten to a pulp by Spode) Bertie needs Jeeves's assistance more desperately than ever. (Penguin blurb)
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.33)
0.5
1 3
1.5
2 5
2.5 3
3 62
3.5 28
4 256
4.5 41
5 317

W.W. Norton

An edition of this book was published by W.W. Norton.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 150,735,696 books! | Top bar: Always visible