HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Before Galileo: The Birth of Modern Science…
Loading...

Before Galileo: The Birth of Modern Science in Medieval Europe

by John Freely

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
47None247,300 (3.3)None

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 159020607X, Hardcover)

Histories of modern science often begin with the heroic battle between Galileo and the Catholic Church, which ignited the Scientific Revolution and led to the world-changing discoveries of Isaac Newton. Virtually nothing is said about the European scholars who came before. In reality, more than a millennium before the Renaissance, a succession of scholars paved the way for the discoveries for which Galileo, Newton, and others are often credited.

In Before Galileo, John Freely examines the pioneering research of the first European scientists, many of them monks whose influence ranged far beyond the walls of the monasteries where they studied and wrote. One of the earliest of them, Saint Bede, writing a thousand years before Galileo, was so renowned that two centuries after his death a Swiss monk wrote that "in the sixth day of the world [God] has made Bede rise from the West as a new Sun to illuminate the whole Earth."

Before Galileo trenchently fills a notable gap in the history of science, and places the great discoveries of the age in their rightful context.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:03 -0400)

A history of science in the Dark Ages documents the achievements of lesser-known European scholars, including the monk Saint Bede, who effectively paved the way for the discoveries of such luminaries as Galileo and Newton.

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
7 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.3)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 1
3.5 1
4 2
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 119,412,915 books! | Top bar: Always visible