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Ganesha's Sweet Tooth by Emily Haynes
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Ganesha's Sweet Tooth

by Emily Haynes, Emily Haynes (Author), Sanjay Patel (Illustrator)

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This picture book is based off of a popular legend in Hindu mythology. Ganesha, a Hindu God , has a sweet tooth for fruit, rice, candy and other sweet things. Ganesha has an elephant head and cruises around with his magical mouse collecting these sweets. Ganesha's favorite is laddoo, a special Indian dessert. One day Ganesha and the magical mouse stumble upon a new kind of laddoo. This laddoo is a jawbreaker laddoo. Mr. Mouse warns Ganesha not to eat this laddoo because he will break his tusk, but Ganesha does not listen. Ganesha takes one bite and breaks his tusk right off. Ganesha tries everything he can think of to get his tusk back on but nothing works. Ganesha is so embarrassed of his missing tusk that out of frustration he throws his tusk and it hits an old man in the head. However, this old man is not mad because this tusk is exactly what he has been searching for. His name is Vyasa, and he needs a special scribe to write a poem. But, this poem is so long that every pen that he has used so far has broken. Vyasa asks Ganesha if he can use his tusk as a scribe. Ganesha agrees and they begin writing, before Ganesha knows it he had already forgotten about how silly he looks without his tusk. This story has a central message to except your imperfections. ( )
  rtrimb1 | Nov 9, 2017 |
Ganesha is a Hindu elephant god that has a sweet tooth. He is accompanied by a little mouse. While he is eating a hard candy his tusk breaks. Ganesha tries everything to reattach the tusk, but it does not work. In his anger, he throws the tusk to the moon. Instead, it flies over it and hits an old man on top of the head. Ganesha is embarrassed that he only has one tusk. The old man asks Ganesha to write a long poem with his tusk. Ganesha is reluctant, but he tries. He keeps writing and writing, and the epic poem of the Mahabharata is written. This folklore is filled with the customs and culture of the Hindu people. The pages are filled with traditional colorful illustrations which in my opinion, carries the storyline. I found this story is a bit difficult to follow, without background knowledge of the Hindu culture. ( )
  JanaeCamardelle | Mar 2, 2016 |
An interesting twist on the story of how Ganesha broke his tusk to write the Mahabharata. It's sweet and funny and the colors are spectacular. Sanjay Patel is a pixar artist and you can definitely see it. The colors are vibrant and the illustrations add to the humor and sweetness of the story. ( )
  Rosa.Mill | Nov 21, 2015 |
An interesting twist on the story of how Ganesha broke his tusk to write the Mahabharata. It's sweet and funny and the colors are spectacular. Sanjay Patel is a pixar artist and you can definitely see it. The colors are vibrant and the illustrations add to the humor and sweetness of the story. ( )
  Rosa.Mill | Nov 21, 2015 |
An interesting twist on the story of how Ganesha broke his tusk to write the Mahabharata. It's sweet and funny and the colors are spectacular. Sanjay Patel is a pixar artist and you can definitely see it. The colors are vibrant and the illustrations add to the humor and sweetness of the story. ( )
  Rosa.Mill | Nov 21, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Emily Haynesprimary authorall editionscalculated
Haynes, EmilyAuthormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Patel, SanjayIllustratormain authorall editionsconfirmed
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To all my nieces and nephews. Be sure to share your laddoos. --Sanjay
To my mom and dad, for giving me a love of books, and everything else. --Emily
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An original story based on Hindu mythology, this book tells the story about how Ganesha's love of sweets led to a broken tusk and the writing of the epic poem, the Mah?abh?arata. Includes author's note about the myth.

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