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Atlas: The Archaeology of an Imaginary City…
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Atlas: The Archaeology of an Imaginary City (Weatherhead Books on Asia)

by Dung Kai-cheung (董啟章)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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Readers pleased by cliff-hanging, nail-biting, page-turning adventure will not be satisfied with "Atlas." Devotees of writers as curious as Borges, Calvino and Eco, will love this map of maps of an imaginary city.
added by dcozy | editThe Japan Times, David Cozy (Sep 2, 2012)
 

» Add other authors (5 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Dung Kai-cheung (董啟章)primary authorall editionscalculated
Hansson, AndersTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kai-cheung, DungTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kushnirsky, JuliaCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McDougall, Bonnie S.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 023116100X, Hardcover)

Set in the long-lost City of Victoria (a fictional world similar to Hong Kong), Atlas is written from the unified perspective of future archaeologists struggling to rebuild a thrilling metropolis. Divided into four sections -- "Theory," "The City," "Streets," and "Signs" -- the novel reimagines Victoria through maps and other historical documents and artifacts, mixing real-world scenarios with purely imaginary people and events while incorporating anecdotes and actual and fictional social commentary and critique.

Much like the quasi-fictional adventures in map-reading and remapping explored by Paul Auster, Jorge Luis Borges, and Italo Calvino, Dung Kai-cheung's novel challenges the representation of place and history and the limits of technical and scientific media in reconstructing a history. It best exemplifies the author's versatility and experimentation, along with China's rapidly evolving literary culture, by blending fiction, nonfiction, and poetry in a story about succeeding and failing to recapture the things we lose. Playing with a variety of styles and subjects, Dung Kai-cheung inventively engages with the fate of Hong Kong since its British "handover" in 1997, which officially marked the end of colonial rule and the beginning of an uncharted future.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:11:15 -0400)

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