HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Mystery of Mercy Close by Marian Keyes
Loading...

The Mystery of Mercy Close

by Marian Keyes

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3913227,416 (3.51)22

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 22 mentions

English (31)  Spanish (1)  All (32)
Showing 1-5 of 31 (next | show all)
Helen Walsh doesn’t believe in fear – it’s just a thing invented by men to get all the money and good job – and yet she’s sinking. Her work as a Private Investigator has dried up, her flat has been repossessed and now some old demons have resurfaced.

Not least in the form of her charming but dodgy ex-boyfriend Jay Parker, who shows up with a missing persons case. Money is tight – so tight Helen’s had to move back in with her elderly parents – and Jay is awash with cash. The missing person is Wayne Diffney, the ‘Wacky One’ from boyband Laddz. He’s vanished from his house in Mercy Close and it’s vital that he’s found – Laddz have a sell-out comeback gig in five days’ time.

Things ended messily with Jay. And she’s never going back there. Besides she has a new boyfriend now, the very sexy detective Artie Devlin and it’s all going well, even though his ex-wife isn’t quite ‘ex’ enough and his teenage son hates her. But the reappearance of Jay is stirring up all kinds of stuff she thought she’d left behind.

Playing by her own rules, Helen is drawn into a dark and glamorous world, where her worst enemy is her own head and where increasingly the only person she feels connected to is Wayne, a man she’s never even met.
  JESGalway | Apr 19, 2018 |
I'd not read a Marian Keyes novel before, but thought I'd give one a chance having liked her voice on Twitter. That voice is certainly on display in The Mystery of Mercy Close, but it's far less charming here.

The main character, Helen Walsh, is a private investigator in her early 30s who's fallen on hard financial times thanks to the economic recession. Out of desperation, she accepts a job from her ex, Jay, who is organising the reunion of a washed-up '90s boyband but has mislaid one of the members just days before a vital reunion gig. Helen launches into this missing-person investigation, all while navigating the on-set of clinical depression and the early days of a relationship with a divorced dad.

So far so intriguing, but while there are some occasionally funny bits I found myself increasingly exasperated with The Mystery of Mercy Close the more I read of it. First, the "mystery" is just far too easy to figure out—and I'm never one to guess who/whydunnit. I shouldn't spend most of the book reminding Helen of the very simple evidence that points out where Wayne is.

But beyond that, even allowing for the effects of a depressive episode, Helen just seemed like an asshole, the kind who's smugly convinced that shunning of mainstream anything is proof of her own uniqueness. There was the distinct whiff of Keyes ladling just a bit more quirk onto her character (and indeed, onto most of the characters in the book) than they could support and retain any claim to verisimilitude.

And then there were the nasty strains of racism/Islamophobia, transphobia, and homophobia throughout which I think we were supposed to find... endearing? funny? "authentically Irish"? I just found them distasteful. ( )
  siriaeve | Jul 25, 2017 |
Spectacularly good. Made me belly laugh and sob. Helen has long been my favourite Walsh sister so was delighted that she got a book all of her own.

Who knew it would be so deep? Her depression was handled with subtlety, humour and the skill of a writer who may just have considered going for a swim weighed down with tinned strawberries. A beautiful book which made me cry to finish it, for all the right reasons. ( )
  boobellina | Jul 12, 2017 |
Spectacularly good. Made me belly laugh and sob. Helen has long been my favourite Walsh sister so was delighted that she got a book all of her own.

Who knew it would be so deep? Her depression was handled with subtlety, humour and the skill of a writer who may just have considered going for a swim weighed down with tinned strawberries. A beautiful book which made me cry to finish it, for all the right reasons. ( )
  boobellina | Jul 12, 2017 |
Marian Keyes has long been one of my favorite authors, one who can encapsulate a horrible event (abuse, addiction, recovery) in a story that at first glance, seems like some kind of fluff until you dig deeper and get to the heart of the story.

Keyes, however, has failed with this book. Terribly.

At first glance through the reviews, I am apparently the only one who caught the not so very subtle racism against Arabs/Muslims peppered throughout the book. Snide comments about "towel heads," "arabic-y looking wording," and the often slights against one of the secondary characters who is Muslim and an Arab. Then once you pick up on the racism, you realise either Marian, or Marian using Helen's voice, is a bigot against fat people, the mentally ill, and anyone who doesn't fit into her little world.

Now you're probably thinking, "But Marian has chronicled her severe depression -- how can she be bigoted against the mentally ill?" And you know, I totally get you on that, because I was floored at first. But with Helen's voice, and point of view, you notice how Helen starts being dismissive against any and all attempts of trying to work on her depression. She rejects drugs (at first), she's dismissive against any alternative methods, and the constant comments about how she was special with her depression because it wasn't like anyone elses in terms of symptoms and effects. Okay, we get it, you're a special snowflake.

This book was a hot mess. Between the bigotry, the lead up to through the mystery, explanation of her past relationship, the foundation of her current one, and really? How she and her BFF ever broke up and why was incredibly weak. Coupled with her depression and the utter lack development for most of the characters, why was this book even published? ( )
  byshieldmaiden | Jan 17, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 31 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

As the youngest of the five Walsh girls, Helen has had a tough time finding her way in the world; at thirty-three, she has her job as a private investigator that has proven less than fruitful and after losing her flat, she has moved back in with Mammy Walsh. Her hunky new boyfriend, Artie, and his three adorable children are a great distraction, but his beautiful ex-wife lives a little too close for comfort. Meanwhile, Helen runs into her ex-boyfriend Jay Parker and reluctantly signs on to help him locate Wayne Diffney, the recently disappeared fourth member of Ireland's biggest mid-nineties boy band, Laddz. Of the five Laddz, the Talented One has long gone on to better things, but the Cute One, the Gay One, and the Other One are all busily shunning carbs and rehearsing their reunion tour, and it is Helen's job to track down Wayne, the Wacky One. Wayne hasn't left a trace, and Helen throws herself into the search wholeheartedly, leaving no stone unturned while watching her own life slowly fall apart, one unpaid bill at a time. Playing by her own rules, she is drawn into a dark and glamorous world where her worst enemy is her own head and where increasingly the only person she feels connected to is Wayne before she even meets him.… (more)

» see all 7 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.51)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 11
2.5 8
3 29
3.5 10
4 36
4.5 5
5 15

Penguin Australia

3 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0718155319, 0718155327, 1405911832

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 126,453,010 books! | Top bar: Always visible