HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Walkable City by Jeff Speck
Loading...

Walkable City (2012)

by Jeff Speck

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1078113,849 (4.24)8
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 8 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
Eminently readable manifesto for reviving not just American cities by making them cities for people not cars. This one pushed all my buttons - cyclist, pedestrian, public transport user, greenie, art and architecture nerd - but you don't have to be all those things to learn from this book. If we want to save the planet and boost the economy we need to remake our towns and cities on a human scale. Jeff Speck doesn't just say what needs to be done he says why, and backs it up with reference to research and case studies. Which may sound dull, but this book is very readable and also laugh out loud funny. A must read for everyone who can influence design of their urban and suburban spaces - but in particular Mayors. (I suspect my Mayor may already have read this). I bought this at a Lecture by the author and also recommend following him on Twitter @JeffSpeckAICP. ( )
  Figgles | May 14, 2014 |
Urban space ( )
  zbigniew | Apr 15, 2014 |
A city planner by trade, Speck is aware of what works and doesn't work in creating and maintaining thriving metropolises. He blames many of his fellow planners for the big mistakes of repeatedly designing cities for the swift movement of cars and then for places to park those cars, destroying the city in the process. The obvious solution is to make the city more "walkable" but many efforts to design cities as a place to walk have failed as well, often due to their half-hearted nature or lack of understanding of what makes a city walkable. To address this, Speck created a ten step list (cited in its entirety below) with each chapter describing the facets involved in creating truly walkable city.
The Useful Walk
Step 1. Put Cars in Their Place.
Step 2. Mix the Uses.
Step 3. Get the Parking Right.
Step 4. Let Transit Work.
The Safe Walk
Step 5. Protect the Pedestrian.
Step 6. Welcome Bikes.
The Comfortable Walk
Step 7. Shape the Spaces.
Step 8. Plant Trees.
The Interesting Walk
Step 9. Make Friendly and Unique Faces.
Step 10. Pick Your Winners.
I read a lot of books about urbanism, city planning, walking, and bicycling (and against the prioritizing of automobiles), so I'm the proverbial choir being preached too. Speck's book clearly states the advantages of his model to everyone, and enunciates the steps in getting to that point. For these reasons, this is the book I'd hand to an automobile-focused doubter to read and think it would have a great chance of making an impression.

Favorite Passages:
“The General Theory of Walkability explains how, to be favored, a walk has to satisfy four main conditions: it must be useful, safe, comfortable, and interesting. Each of these qualities is essential and none alone is sufficient. Useful means that most aspects of daily life are located close at hand and organized in a way that walking serves them well. Safe means that the street has been designed to give pedestrians a fighting chance against being hit by automobiles; they must not only be safe but feel safe, which is even tougher to satisfy. Comfortable means that buildings and landscape shape urban streets into ‘outdoor living rooms,’ in contrast to wide-open spaces, which usually fail to attract pedestrians. Interesting means that sidewalks are lined by unique buildings with friendly faces and that signs of humanity abound.”
“Since midcentury, whether intentionally or by accident, most American cities have effectively become no-walking zones. In the absence of any larger vision or mandate, city engineers—worshipping the twin gods of Smooth Traffic and Ample Parking—have turned our downtowns into places that are easy to get to but not worth arriving at.”
“Engineers design streets for speeds well above the posted limit, so that speeding drivers will be safe—a practice that, of course, causes the very speeding it hopes to protect against.” ( )
  Othemts | Dec 29, 2013 |
Fantastic treatise on how to fix what's wrong with most of America's sprawling cities (and what is right in some of our biggest and best cities). I do not understand how any urban planner, having seen the evidence in this book, does not then follow its precepts. There will always be plenty of people in this country that want the country/suburban life, but as Speck points out, the number of those looking for a more lively urban lifestyle is growing and we need to have great cities! He says walks should be useful (by having mixed use, limited traffic, and good transit), safe (by protecting the pedestrian and encouraging biking), comfortable (by shaping space and planting trees) and interesting. One stat that stuck in my mind from this read is that a 23 minute commute is the equivalent knock on one's happiness to taking a 19% pay cut! For me, along with The Read-Aloud Handbook, one of the most important books I have read recently. Highly recommended. ( )
  saholc | Dec 3, 2013 |
Jeff Speck's Walkable City is an accessible look at American urban planning practices over the previous decades and the largely car-friendly cities they have produced. It also offers a prescription for moving away from auto-centricity to pedestrian, bike and transit supportive cities.

Speck argues that Millennials - the demographic to which I sometimes begrudgingly belong - are more interested in urban life and less interested in owning vehicles than preceding generations. In my case, this is an accurate assessment. Speck offers 10 suggestions for making cities friendlier for non-drivers. His ideas range from having scaled rates for parking - and fewer parking spaces - to planting trees along roadways to slow driving speeds and keep pedestrians safe.

As someone who is not a student of urban planning, it's hard to judge how revolutionary Speck's ideas are and how much opposition exists to their implementation. Based on living in Pittsburgh - which I consider a far cry from a pedestrian / transit friendly city - it seems like Speck's ideas are making some headway in revitalizing, urban centers. I hope this is a trend that continues as more young people choose to make this city their home.

Walkable City is probably best suited for those a novice understanding of urban planning. I learned some interesting things - how fears of traffic congestion are often overblown (but have powerful sway over city planners), how confusing streets are often the safest and how making improvements to already walkable neighborhoods is generally more productive than trying to rehab lost causes - but never felt bogged down by jargon. Overall, Walkable City is a well argued, enjoyable and generally humble look at how we can make our urban spaces safer and more enjoyable for everyone. ( )
  bzromine | Nov 26, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
For Alice
First words
This is not the next great book on American cities.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Not related to Mary Soderstrom's "The walkable city : from Haussmann's boulevards to Jane Jacobs' streets and beyond" (2008), https://www.librarything.com/work/6355015
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0374285810, Hardcover)

Jeff Speck has dedicated his career to determining what makes cities thrive. And he has boiled it down to one key factor: walkability.
     The very idea of a modern metropolis evokes visions of bustling sidewalks, vital mass transit, and a vibrant, pedestrian-friendly urban core. But in the typical American city, the car is still king, and downtown is a place that’s easy to drive to but often not worth arriving at.
     Making walkability happen is relatively easy and cheap; seeing exactly what needs to be done is the trick. In this essential new book, Speck reveals the invisible workings of the city, how simple decisions have cascading effects, and how we can all make the right choices for our communities.
     Bursting with sharp observations and real-world examples, giving key insight into what urban planners actually do and how places can and do change, Walkable City lays out a practical, necessary, and eminently achievable vision of how to make our normal American cities great again.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:48:29 -0400)

Jeff Speck has dedicated his career to determining what makes cities thrive. And he has boiled it down to one key factor: walkability. The very idea of a modern metropolis evokes visions of bustling sidewalks, vital mass transit, and a vibrant, pedestrian-friendly urban core. But in the typical American city, the car is still king, and downtown is a place that's easy to drive to but often not worth arriving at. Making walkability happen is relatively easy and cheap; seeing exactly what needs to be done is the trick. In this essential new book, Speck reveals the invisible workings of the city, how simple decisions have cascading effects, and how we can all make the right choices for our communities. Bursting with sharp observations and real-world examples, giving key insight into what urban planners actually do and how places can and do change, Walkable City lays out a practical, necessary, and eminently achievable vision of how to make our normal American cities great again.… (more)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
5 wanted1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.24)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 2
3.5
4 11
4.5 2
5 6

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 93,468,102 books! | Top bar: Always visible