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My Journey As a Combat Medic (From Desert…
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My Journey As a Combat Medic (From Desert Storm to Operation Enduring… (edition 2011)

by Patrick Thibeault

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Member:Staciele
Title:My Journey As a Combat Medic (From Desert Storm to Operation Enduring Freedom)
Authors:Patrick Thibeault
Info:Combat Medic with Indianapolis Business Journal (2011), Edition: 1ST, Paperback, 201 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:***
Tags:military, medic, PTSD, war

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My Journey as a Combat Medic: From Desert Storm to Operation Enduring Freedom (Osprey Digital Generals) by Patrick Thibeault

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Patrick Thibeault has dedicated his life to serving others both as a soldier and as a nurse practitioner. There was no doubt as I read this book, that he has a deep commitment towards the health and welfare of others. Whether the patient was on the battlefield, an enemy, someone in his barracks, or back here in the states in a hospital, they received the best care possible from Thibeault.

I think this is a great book for someone who can identify with being a soldier, a medic, or someone who has been in the military. It may read a little dry for the "outsider". The author tells stories of his time both in Desert Storm and Afghanistan and shares his private thoughts and moments with the reader. This isn't the type of book that tells of the horrors of the battlefields, but at appropriate times, he does share stories of those he saved and couldn't save.

Thibeault has since retired from the military and joined the civilian life as a nurse practitioner. He shares his personal struggles with PTSD and again, it reminds me of how little the military does to prepare soldiers for the return home compared to the amount of training they receive to go to war. Whether I am reading non-fiction or fiction, this seems to be a central theme. His descriptions of uncomfortable situations that he has been in will make me much more aware of those who may be suffering from PTSD that I may come across.

If you know a young man or woman looking to enter the military and/or looking to be a medic, this book would be an excellent introduction to their career choice. Thibeault closes the book with a letter to any future medics with recommendations and advice from his 20 years in the service.

I think this book paints an accurate picture of military life both on the battlefield and in the barracks. He doesn't hold back with his opinions of how certain things were done or not done. My favorite part of the book were the photos that he included. The photos gave the book a personal touch and brought some of his stories to life.

Thibeault gives the reader an honest look inside the life of a combat medic, one that needs to be heard. ( )
  Staciele | Jan 13, 2013 |
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