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En man som heter Ove by Fredrik Backman
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En man som heter Ove (original 2012; edition 2012)

by Fredrik Backman, Torsten Wahlund

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,6972382,198 (4.26)288
Member:reverbeo
Title:En man som heter Ove
Authors:Fredrik Backman
Other authors:Torsten Wahlund
Info:Stockholm : Bonnier Audio, cop. 2012
Collections:Books read in Swedish, Read but unowned (inactive)
Rating:*****
Tags:Fiction, Swedish authors, Sweden, Audiobooks, Humor, Loneliness

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A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman (2012)

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» See also 288 mentions

English (224)  German (5)  Spanish (2)  Danish (2)  Finnish (1)  Dutch (1)  Piratical (1)  Norwegian (1)  Swedish (1)  All (238)
Showing 1-5 of 224 (next | show all)
An amazing and unexpectedly wonderful book. I absolutely loved it. Ove is a relatable character and this was a book I was sad to come to the end of. ( )
  richardstep1 | May 24, 2017 |
a beautiful, sweet, sad and savory story of a bitter older man set in Sweden. A cat and new neighbors melt him done and melt your heart in the process. Lovely, lovely story. ( )
  anglophile65 | May 23, 2017 |
I haven't loved a book this much in a long time. I laughed and cried. Ove truly was a man whose heart was too large, but like many he hid it behind a gruff exterior. I think my favorite chapter was the one about the cat (no spoilers). I just felt good reading this book and highly recommend it. I can't wait to discuss it with my book club. ( )
  thevoice1208 | May 23, 2017 |
My new all-time-favorite book. i experienced an incredible range of emotions while reading about Ove. I giggled, laughed out loud, smiled, felt frustration and cried. Growing up with a strong European background, I was able to identify with the characters and the community. I didn't want the book to end. ( )
  jnechiporenio | May 17, 2017 |
If it was easier to post photos here, I would have added one of my book club tonight posed around my Saab convertible (2002) that I drove for the first time today. So as usual, my review is about how the book impacted me, not a summary, as I have said many times before, other people do a much better job at that. He drives a Saab (second line of the book). That's all he ever drove. A Saab is not always my primary vehicle, but I have owned one or another for the better part of a quarter century now. He was dismayed and upset with GM's acquisition of Saab. Oh hell yes. He went to the Saab 50th anniversary convention back in '97. Oops, sorry, no that was me, LOL. Now I will have you know that I am not one dimensional, Sonja's cat was called Ernest Hemingway, my favorite author. And what about the version of Cat on the cover of the book? That Cat has two ears, an entire tail, and no bald patches. NOT the book Cat clearly, but something marketers thought would be more appealing I suppose. And more like my cat, than actual Cat. My cat is intact, and just came close to deleting this! I struggled with how high a rating I could give this...in the end, it was a great feel good book, with plenty of sadness, but not the annoying sort, more the poignant kind. But not a literary masterpiece. The strange part was our book club discussion, maybe it had something to do with it being the first spring-like day in nearly two weeks, but we talked and talked, and not so much about the book directly, but abut how it was reflected in our lives...the best kind of discussion! Love my book club gals! Looking forward to reading his other books.

Update, 24 hours later....MY Saab is billowing steam in the parking lot at Lowe's. In a minor miracle, I figure out how to open the hood. It turns out that even a car idiot can identify a leaking radiator hose. So I call the hubs and he arrives with FOUR boxes of various radiator hoses. He finds one that is in the ballpark, slaps it on and I head on down the highway to home at 65 mph, with the temperature gauge steady as a rock. So yeah, I married Ove. ( )
  MaureenCean | May 13, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 224 (next | show all)
Den svenske suksessbloggeren Fredrik Backman drar oss gjennom en forutsigbar fortelling som trykker på alle de rette knappene inntil vi er trygt plassert innenfor vår egen komfortsone.
added by annek49 | editNRK, Knut Hoem (May 9, 2013)
 
Livet är obegripligt, världen är läskig och det går inte att skydda sig mot den. Fredrik Backman berättar underhållande om botemedlet i sin debutroman.
added by annek49 | editDN, Lotta Olsson (Jan 14, 2013)
 
Genom humorns prisma belyser ”En man som heter Ove” teman som åldrande, vänskap, sorg, livslust och den föränderliga mansrollen. Boken är varken behärskad eller finputsad – delar är återvunna från Café-bloggen och har skarvats in lite slarvigt – men den är en skruvad och gripande romandebut som mycket väl kan vara början på ett stort humoristiskt författarskap.
 
This word-of-mouth bestseller has sold more than 650,000 copies in Sweden and has been a hit across Europe. It deserves to do at least as well here. I loved A Man Called Ove so much that I started to ration how much I read to prolong my time with this cantankerous, low-key, misunderstood man. If you enjoyed Rachel Joyce’s marvellous bestseller, The Unlikely Pilgrimage Of Harold Fry, you will love this book.

Each short chapter of A Man Called Ove could stand alone as a beautifully crafted short story. Bring the chapters together and you have the most uplifting, life-affirming and often comic tale of how kindness, love and happiness can be found in the most unlikely places
 
Backman's tale of 59-yea-old curmudgeon, Ove, not only captured the hearts of Backman's fellow Swedes, but has also swept across Europe as a word-of-mouth best-seller; a domino effect that suggests community spirit and social responsibility isn't quite so lacking as we're often told it is....On occasion the slightly repetitive tone becomes cloying, but Backman can tickle the funny bone and tug on the heart strings when he needs to, and is a clever enough storyteller to not overindulge in either.

For those of you who don't want your fiction to make you feel warm and fuzzy inside, A Man Called Ove isn't for you. Yet it's surprisingly cheering to think how many people have embraced this simple but heartwarming novel.
 

» Add other authors (12 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Backman, Fredrikprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Due, Nina M.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Koch, HenningTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mennerich, LaurenceTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Newbern, GeorgeNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ravnild, Louise ArdenfeltTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sybesma, EdithTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
Dear Neda. It's always meant to make you laugh. Always.
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Ove is fifty-nine.
Quotations
Death is a strange thing. People live their whole lives as if it does not exist, and yet it's often one of the great motivations for living. Some of us, in time, become so conscious of it that we live harder, more obstinately, with more fury. Some need its constant presence to even be aware of its antithesis. Others become so preoccupied with it that they go into the waiting room long before it has announced its arrival. We fear it, yet most of us fear more than anything that it may take someone other than ourselves. For the greatest fear of death is always that it will pass us by. And leave us there alone.
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Book description
Meet Ove. He’s a curmudgeon—the kind of man who points at people he dislikes as if they were burglars caught outside his bedroom window. He has staunch principles, strict routines, and a short fuse. People call him “the bitter neighbor from hell.” But must Ove be bitter just because he doesn’t walk around with a smile plastered to his face all the time?

Behind the cranky exterior there is a story and a sadness. So when one November morning a chatty young couple with two chatty young daughters move in next door and accidentally flatten Ove’s mailbox, it is the lead-in to a comical and heartwarming tale of unkempt cats, unexpected friendship, and the ancient art of backing up a U-Haul. All of which will change one cranky old man and a local residents’ association to their very foundations.
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