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Critique of the School for Wives / Learned…
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Critique of the School for Wives / Learned Women / Misanthrope / School…

by Molière

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I read these and thought they were stupid. Then afterwards I saw that these were real things Moliere was tackling, and so of course they seem stupid, because he is trying to expose their stupidity. So, very socially relevant then, and I believe now as well.
  funfunyay | Aug 15, 2009 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0192833413, Paperback)

This unique volume brings together four of Molière's greatest verse comedies covering the best years of his prolific writing career. Actor, director, and playwright, Molière (1622-73) was one of the finest and most influential French dramatists, adept at portraying human foibles and puncturing pomposity. The School for Wives was his first great success; Tartuffe, condemned and banned for five years, his most controversial play. The Misanthrope is his acknowledged masterpiece, and The Clever Women his last, and perhaps best-constructed, verse piece. In addition this collection includes a spirited attack on his enemies and a defense of his theater, in the form of two sparkling short plays, The School for Wives Criticized and The Impromptu at Versailles.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:18:49 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

This unique volume brings together four of Moliere's greatest verse comedies covering the best years of his prolific writing career. Actor, director, and playwright, Moliere (1622-73) was one of the finest and most influential French dramatists, adept at portraying human foibles and puncturing pomposity. The School for Wives was his first great success; Tartuffe, condemned and banned for five years, his most controversial play. The Misanthrope is his acknowledged masterpiece, and The Clever Women his last, and perhaps best-constructed, verse piece. In addition this collection includes a spirited attack on his enemies and a defense of his theater, in the form of two sparkling short plays, The School for Wives Criticized and The Impromptu at Versailles.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

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