HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Vampire in Lore and Legend (Dover…
Loading...

The Vampire in Lore and Legend (Dover Occult) (original 1929; edition 2001)

by Montague Summers (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
276271,648 (3.5)None
"Throughout the whole vast shadowy world of ghosts and demons there is no figure so terrible, no figure so dreaded and abhorred, yet [looked upon] with such fearful fascination, as the vampire, who is himself neither ghost nor demon, but yet who partakes the dark natures and possesses the mysterious and terrible qualities of both." So begins this riveting study by one of the foremost authorities on witchcraft and occult phenomena. An indefatigable researcher, Summers explores the presence of vampires in Greek and Roman lore, in England and Ireland during Anglo-Saxon times, in Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Russia, Romania, and Bulgaria, even in modern Greece. More than just a collection of library lore, however, this detailed examination of the history of vampirism in Europe also includes anecdotes and firsthand accounts gathered by the author from peasants in places where belief in vampires was still common. A fascinating, sometimes terrifying book, The Vampire in Lore and Legend is a "mine of out-of-the-way information full of unspeakable tales," writes The New York Times; and according to Outlook, "a fascinating inquiry into the vampire legend . . . a storehouse of curious and interesting lore." Of great interest to any enthusiast of the supernatural and the occult, this book will appeal as well to the legions of general readers captivated by this ancient myth.… (more)
Member:OJSB
Title:The Vampire in Lore and Legend (Dover Occult)
Authors:Montague Summers (Author)
Info:Dover Publications (2001), 352 pages
Collections:Read but unowned
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

The Vampire in Europe by Montague Summers (1929)

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 2 of 2
The Vampire in Lore and Legend is a reprint of Montague Summers's 1929 book The Vampire in Europe, a follow-up to The Vampire: His Kith and Kin. While the latter work has a broad range of subjects-including what vampires are, how to kill them, and an extensive history of vampire fiction-The Vampire in Europe concentrates on vampire legends in ancient Greece and Rome, England and Ireland, modern Greece, and Eastern Europe.

It is important to realize, before reading his works, that Summers is not merely interested in the vampire as a legend. "That a large number of cases of vampirism must be accounted certain only the most prejudiced will deny," he writes in his introduction. He was ordained a deacon in the Church of England and shortly thereafter converted to Catholicism and began writing about the occult from a Catholic (if unorthodox) perspective. In addition to The Vampire: His Kith and Kin and The Vampire in Europe, he published two books on witchcraft, as well as the first English translation of the Malleus Maleficarum (1928), and The Werewolf (1933, republished by Dover as The Werewolf in Lore and Legend). He believed that such creatures were the work of the devil and strongly advocated the reinstatement of the death penalty for witches.

The Vampire in Europe is meticulously researched, including hundreds of footnotes and quoted passages (most given without English translations, which is downright frustrating for a reader not familiar with Latin, German, Italian, and several versions of Greek). Despite this fact (or perhaps because of it), the book often reads like the ravings of a mad professor. Summers includes unsubstantiated anecdotes, long passages of translation, and even an entire chapter of Varney the Vampire, whenever it seems to occur to him and not in any sort of organized fashion. He rambles from one example to another until the reader loses track of the subject, with some material so off-topic that it seems suited for entirely different chapters, and ends abruptly without much of an attempt to die the disparate legends together.

Still, if one can manage to plod through the more awkward parts of Summers's writing style, The Vampire in Europe is an abundant resource for those interested in the Occult, European folklore, or the history of vampire legends. Lovers of vampire fiction should read this book, as well as The Vampire: His Kith and Kin (especially the last chapter, "The Vampire in Literature"), to learn about the vampire legend before he became the star of the paranormal romances flooding the market today-and writers, to pick up ideas for how to make your vampires stand out from the crowd. (Did you know, for example, that according to some Eastern European legends a human can protect themselves by tossing a hawthorn branch or spilling grain, which the vampire will be compelled to pick up and thus forget his prey?) One need not believe it all true, as did Montague Summers, in order to find The Vampire in Europe a fascinating study of folklore.

http://www.helium.com/items/1483879-montague-summers-the-vampire-in-europe ( )
2 vote siroc | Aug 5, 2010 |
896 The Vampire in Europe, by Montague Summers (read 2 Apr 1967) While this book is just a mishmash of stories and references to vampires, it is said that some of Montague Summers' stuff is better. He was born in 1880 and died 10 Aug 1948. He may have actually been ordained a priest. He was an authority on the Gothic novel. His 1938 book, The Gothic Quest, reportedly is the best book on the Gothic novel. He edited new editions of Walpole's The Castle of Otranto, Charlotte Dacre's Zofloyo, or The Moor, Flamenberg's The Necromancer, and the Marquis of Grosse's Horrid Mysteries. I would like to locate his book The Gothic Quest. [This was written when I had a great interest in the classic Gothic novels--that interest waned after I waded through The Mysteries of Udolpho in April of 1969.] ( )
  Schmerguls | Nov 16, 2009 |
Showing 2 of 2
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Information from the Russian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Please do not combine this work with "The Vampire" also known as "The Vampire: His Kith and Kin" or "Vampires and Vampirism", it is a different work.

"The Vampire in Europe" has also been published under the title: "The Vampire in Lore and Legend".
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (4)

"Throughout the whole vast shadowy world of ghosts and demons there is no figure so terrible, no figure so dreaded and abhorred, yet [looked upon] with such fearful fascination, as the vampire, who is himself neither ghost nor demon, but yet who partakes the dark natures and possesses the mysterious and terrible qualities of both." So begins this riveting study by one of the foremost authorities on witchcraft and occult phenomena. An indefatigable researcher, Summers explores the presence of vampires in Greek and Roman lore, in England and Ireland during Anglo-Saxon times, in Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Russia, Romania, and Bulgaria, even in modern Greece. More than just a collection of library lore, however, this detailed examination of the history of vampirism in Europe also includes anecdotes and firsthand accounts gathered by the author from peasants in places where belief in vampires was still common. A fascinating, sometimes terrifying book, The Vampire in Lore and Legend is a "mine of out-of-the-way information full of unspeakable tales," writes The New York Times; and according to Outlook, "a fascinating inquiry into the vampire legend . . . a storehouse of curious and interesting lore." Of great interest to any enthusiast of the supernatural and the occult, this book will appeal as well to the legions of general readers captivated by this ancient myth.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
In all the darkest pages of the malign supernatural there is no more terrible tradition than that of the vampire; a pariah even among demons. Foul are his ravages; gruesome and seemingly barbaric are the ancient and approved methods by which folk must rid themselves of this hideous pest.

So wrote Montague Summers, the greatest vampirologist of them all. In this book Summers, with scholarly thoroughness, uncovers the roots of a legend that continues to lay hold of the imagination.

Behind the awesome and resonant figure of Count Dracula lies a long and terrible tradition of the returning dead and here, in chilling detail, the origins and development of the vampire legend are traced through a thousand years of European civilization.
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.5)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2 2
2.5
3 7
3.5 3
4 11
4.5
5 2

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 155,892,933 books! | Top bar: Always visible