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The Introvert's Way: Living a Quiet Life in a Noisy World (edition 2012)

by Sophia Dembling

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1129107,804 (3.38)5
Member:bclplyr
Title:The Introvert's Way: Living a Quiet Life in a Noisy World
Authors:Sophia Dembling
Info:Perigee Trade (2012), Paperback, 208 pages
Collections:Read but unowned
Rating:****
Tags:nonfiction, introversion, personality

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The Introvert's Way: Living a Quiet Life in a Noisy World by Sophia Dembling

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Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
Typically snotty better-than-thou-coarse-extroverts book. Offers nothing new or enlightening, just the usual "I'm an introvert and stop judging me." The writing was of fair quality, and it was presented well, hence the two stars.

http://the-toast.net/2014/11/10/sorry-murdered-everyone-im-introvert/ ( )
  bluehighlighter | Dec 8, 2014 |
A very refreshingly humorous book (if I may use that term). This book has a very light way of dealing with the issues of introversion compared to the other sombre books that I have read on the subject matter. Sophia teaches introverts to be proud of their introversion.

I especially like her humour. Some of the tidbits I really enjoyed were:

"We didn't know that you were an introvert. We simply thought you were a bitch" and how introverts can use "diarrhoea" as an excuse to leave a boring extrovertish party. I also had a good laugh and thoroughly enjoyed myself.

Sophia deals with almost all of the issues that plague introverts including the need to make friends, partying, raising introvert children, working in a "privacy sucking cubicle", exercising, etc.

She also dismisses some of the very important claims of psychologists that introverts seem to be less happy than extroverts. The problem with these kinds of claims being that extroverts are likely to choose extreme answers. This means that if an extrovert is happy, she is likely to circle 5 on a scale of 1-5 whereas if this is true of an introvert, she is likely to circle 3 or 4 NOT because she is less happy but because she is very likely to choose a balanced answer.

I also like the Irish bits of the book especially how extroverts party when they go weeeeeeeee....

Some reviewers are quick to jump and compare this book to Susan Cain's Quiet: the power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking". I feel that this is a bit unfair. I believe that we, introverts, should support each other in expressing our ideas in writing and in Susan Cain's words "support a Quiet Revolution".
( )
  prasenjeet | Dec 8, 2014 |
A quick, easy read. Lots of very short chapters written in a very breezy style. In fact they read like blog posts, which is unsurprising given that she has long maintained a blog about introversion.

I found many of the many more thoughts that she mentions to be familiar ones, but at the same time they were revealed in the book as though they are all self-evidently introverted feelings. While it was satisfying to see that someone else has knows about such feelings, I consider a number of them to be rather less than respectable and in fact I'm a pretty fucked up human being. So I'm not convinced on her say-so that all of them are indeed signals of introversion.

That said, one of the points she made was something I had not paid much attention to before, which is that in descriptions of extro and introversion, extroversion is always presented as normative and introversion as a deviation: the consequence of having poorly developed extroverted behaviors rather than a legitimate characteristic in its own right. For whatever reason that caught my attention and is something I can't not notice now. ( )
  drbubbles | Dec 1, 2014 |
I was unimpressed and bored. I began to scan, and then simply quit reading. While there were some interesting thoughts, it seemed more of a rant. The author did not seem comfortable inside her own introvert nature.
  lgaikwad | Nov 26, 2014 |
The author, a self-identified introvert, uses her own experiences and "research" as a platform for providing advice and anecdotes to introverted readers.

When I began reading this book, I read the 2 - 3 page chapters word by word, but as I progressed, I began skimming it because so much was repetitive. The information is fairly superficial, and unfortunately includes a fair amount of comparing introverts and extroverts, with introverts coming out on top. As an introvert, I am looking forward to reading a book about me, about us, that doesn't use comparison to validate being introverted, or that insists that my introverted choices are as valid as those of extroverts. I am really beyond that. I'm looking for a book that addresses introversion from a more mature and lived-in way, rather than being told consistently that I'm okay to be whom I am. I already know that. Tell me something I don't know!

Truly, I'm not down on the book, and more of these need to be written for people who are just figuring out that being introverted is normal and a healthy choice. The book's focus is to help introverts, who are questioning themselves, to accept who they truly are. Nothing wrong with that! It's just that I needed more substance.

A fair number of chapters discussed how to deal with parties: to attend without going nuts, to decline invitations, to interact with people one likes and dislikes, and so on. Phone calls and introvert etiquette, social media, drinking alcohol, travel, friends and family, and introvert fun, are all discussed in playful and interesting language. I believe this book will be useful for younger people (20s-30s) who are still finding their way through family and social expectations and obligations. The advice is reliable, kind, protective, and reasonable. If you don't know whether you're introvert or not, this may help you to figure it out, and quietly accept who you are.

This book is engaging, well written and well edited. Surprisingly, the work is indexed, which may be useful for some readers. One thing that I found lacking is that the spiritual aspect of being solitary was not discussed. This is most likely of interest to introverts who are more mature in their introversion so that their concerns are less about others and more focused on themselves. ( )
  brickhorse | Sep 22, 2014 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0399537694, Paperback)

Introversion Is a Gift.

This clever and pithy book challenges introverts to take ownership of their personalities...with quiet strength. Sophia Dembling asserts that the introvert’s lifestyle is not “wrong” or lacking, as society or extroverts would have us believe. Through a combination of personal insights and psychology, The Introvert’s Way helps and encourages introverts to embrace their nature, to respect traits they may have been ashamed of and reframe them as assets.

You’re not shy; rather, you appreciate the joys of quiet. You’re not antisocial; instead, you enjoy recharging through time alone. You’re not unfriendly, but you do find more meaning in one-on-one connections than large gatherings.

By honoring what makes them unique, this astute and inspiring book challenges introverts to “own” their introversion, igniting a quiet revolution that will change how they see themselves and how they engage with the world.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:05:50 -0400)

This clever and pithy book challenges introverts to take ownership of their personalities...with quiet strength. Sophia Dembling asserts that the introvert's lifestyle is not "wrong" or lacking, as society or extroverts would have us believe. Through a combination of personal insights and psychology, The Introvert's Way helps and encourages introverts to embrace their nature, to respect traits they may have been ashamed of and reframe them as assets. You're not shy; rather, you appreciate the joys of quiet. You're not antisocial; instead, you enjoy recharging through time alone. You're not unfriendly, but you do find more meaning in one-on-one connections than large gatherings. By honoring what makes them unique, this astute and inspiring book challenges introverts to "own" their introversion, igniting a quiet revolution that will change how they see themselves and how they engage with the world.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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