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Proof of Heaven: A Neurosurgeon's Journey…
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Proof of Heaven: A Neurosurgeon's Journey into the Afterlife

by Eben Alexander, III

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1,377698,483 (3.46)30
  1. 01
    On Life After Death by Elizabeth Kubler-Ross (SqueakyChu)
    SqueakyChu: This book is by a doctor whose views about life after death have had remarkable effects on the nursing care of dying patients. A very worthwhile read.
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English (66)  Dutch (2)  French (1)  All languages (69)
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Regardless of how detailed this person's experience was, and how unusual his physical condition was, it is still a subjective case of ONE person's Near Death Experience. It isn't "proof" of anything. The fact that his brain wasn't supporting consciousness in the way that is currently understood doesn't mean that his consciousness was separate from the brain Maybe it was, but this isn't proof - not in the way that proof is defined scientifically. It would be more compelling if there were other cases like his that had similar experiences. I understand that the rare nature of his disease/condition makes that difficult. BUT - it was very interesting, especially the level of detail he experienced. I would dearly like it to be true. ( )
  LisaBurns1066 | Jun 9, 2019 |
I had a discussion with a co-worker about what happens when we die. My position has always been, no one knows for sure or course until they get there. My initial thinking is nothing. Just nothing. He was taken aback by that. Well there has to be something, he said. And I responded, why? He suggested this book as a way to address that and I was intrigued so I read it.

After reading it I was left with pretty much the same opinion. I was disappointed there was not more here I could latch on to. In looking at some of the reviews here I was one of those disappointed by the poor presentation. Then looking a bit into Dr. Alexander I was even more disappointed. I could not separate the money and fame aspect of leaving the medical field to evangelize his experience. Maybe I am just a hard core skeptic. The encounters he had on the other side were briefly sketched and vague in nature. Most of the book was focused on his illness and the drama surrounding his recovery and the vigil of his loved ones. Along with this we get much on his upbringing and how that greatly affected him.

On the other take if this truly is what happens to us then we certainly have a joyous future in store. The message that everyone would want to hear. But then again I wondered about what happens to the truly evil people who depart. Are they also offered this reunion to the love and nurturing or is their afterlife not so rosy. And how about all the in between types? Many unanswered questions that you won't find answers to here. Along with the purpose of, if any, in why we are here to begin with. ( )
  knightlight777 | Mar 12, 2019 |
This was familiar territory for me as I have had a near-death experience. ( )
  Beaujolais | Aug 27, 2018 |
Nice thought. He's convinced, I'm not, alas. ( )
  Siubhan | Feb 28, 2018 |
"A SCIENTIST'S CASE FOR THE AFTERLIFE Near-death experiences, or NDEs, are controversial. Thousands of people have had them, but many in the scientific community have argued that they are impossible. Dr. Eben Alexander was one of those people. A highly trained neurosurgeon who had operated on thousands of brains in the course of his career, Alexander knew that what people of faith call the "soul" is really a product of brain chemistry. NDEs, he would have been the first to explain, might feel real to the people having them, but in truth they are simply fantasies produced by brains under extreme stress. Then came the day when Dr. Alexander's own brain was attacked by an extremely rare illness. The part of the brain that controls thought and emotion--and in essence makes us human-- shut down completely. For seven days Alexander lay in a hospital bed in a deep coma. Then, as his doctors weighed the possibility of stopping treatment, Alexander's eyes popped open. He had come back. Alexander's recovery is by all accounts a medical miracle. But the real miracle of his story lies elsewhere. While his body lay in coma, Alexander journeyed beyond this world and encountered an angelic being who guided him into the deepest realms of super-physical existence. There he met, and spoke with, the Divine source of the universe itself. This story sounds like the wild and wonderful imaginings of a skilled fantasy writer. But it is not fantasy. Before Alexander underwent his journey, he could not reconcile his knowledge of neuroscience with any belief in heaven, God, or the soul. That difficulty with belief created an empty space that no professional triumph could erase. Today he is a doctor who believes that true health can be achieved only when we realize that God and the soul are real and that death is not the end of personal existence but only a transition. This story would be remarkable no matter who it happened to. That it happened to Dr. Alexander makes it revolutionary. No scientist or person of faith will be able to ignore it. Reading it will change your life"-- Provided by publisher.
"Near-death experiences are controversial. Thousands of people have had them, but many in the scientific community have argued that they are impossible. Dr. Eben Alexander was one of those people. A highly trained neurosurgeon, Alexander knew that what people of faith call the "soul" is really a product of brain chemistry. NDEs, he would have been the first to explain, might feel real, but they are fantasies produced by brains under extreme stress. Then came the day when Dr. Alexander's own brain was attacked by a rare illness. The part of the brain that controls thought and emotion--and in essence makes us human--shut down completely. For seven days Alexander lay in a hospital bed in a deep coma. Then, as his doctors weighed the possibility of stopping treatment, Alexander's eyes popped open. He had come back. Alexander's recovery is a medical miracle. But the real miracle of his story lies elsewhere. While his body lay in coma, Alexander journeyed beyond this world and encountered an angelic being who guided him into the deepest realms of super-physical existence. There he met, and spoke with, the Divine source of the universe itself. This story sounds like the wild imaginings of a skilled fantasy writer. But it is not fantasy. Before Alexander underwent his journey, he could not reconcile his knowledge of neuroscience with any belief in heaven, God, or the soul. That difficulty with belief created an empty space that no professional triumph could erase. Today he is a doctor who believes that true health can be achieved only when we realize that God and the soul are real and that death is not the end of personal existence but only a transition. This story would be remarkable no matter who it happened to. That it happened to Dr. Alexander makes it revolutionary"-- Provided by publisher.
  tony_sturges | Oct 10, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 66 (next | show all)
We talk about his past life and his present one, and about the strange voyage that divided the two. We talk about some of the stories he tells in Proof of Heaven, which has sold nearly two million copies and remains near the top of the New York Times best-seller list nearly a year after its release. We also talk about some of the stories you won't find in the book, stories I've heard from current and former friends and colleagues, and stories I've pulled from court documents and medical-board complaints, stories that in some cases give an entirely new context to the stories in the book, and in other cases simply contradict them.
 
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This book is dedicated to all of my loving family, with boundless gratitude.
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When I was a kid, I would often dream of flying.  (Prologue)
My eyes popped open.
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The message had three parts, and if I had to translate them into earthly language, I'd say that they ran something like this:
"You are loved and cherished, dearly, forever."
"You have nothing to fear."
"There is nothing you can do wrong."
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As he lay in a coma, neurosurgeon Eben Alexander explains that he "journeyed beyond this world and encountered an angelic being who guided him into the deepest realms of super-physical existence [where] he met and spoke with the Divine source of the universe itself"--P. [4] of cover.… (more)

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Beyond Words Publishing

4 editions of this book were published by Beyond Words Publishing.

Editions: 1442359315, 1451695187, 1451695195, 1476753024

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