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Edwardo: The Horriblest Boy in the Whole…
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Edwardo: The Horriblest Boy in the Whole Wide World

by John Burningham

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Edwardo, your typical rambunctious boy, is declared the "horriblest boy in the world" that is until he does something to change the views of the adults. Who then think, maybe Edwardo isn't so bad.
  alcrumpler | Jul 21, 2014 |
A very interesting of a typical naughty boy who discovers his lovely side in the end.

Age: 4-6
Source Pierce College Library ( )
  Gelettie | Mar 22, 2014 |
Edwardo is a mean, dirty boy. Everyone tells him. The more they tell him how awful he is the worse he becomes. Then during a serious of accidents, things get better. People start telling Edwardo he is a good boy. As they do this he becomes better and better. So now he may still be mean, dirty and cruel, but he is also a good boy. I loved this book!
Ages: 3-7
Source: Pierce College Library ( )
  RachelHollingsworth | Feb 6, 2014 |
This book caught my eye because of the title; I wondered how could a boy so horrible that he would be deemed ‘the Horriblest Boy in the Whole Wide World?’ It turns out that Edwardo throughout the story is just acting like a typical child and all children get into trouble sometimes. For example, Edwardo is mean to little children or he chases the cat around the house. Well in my opinion no child is perfect and every once in a while children will do, as the book states: mean clumsy, cruel, noisy, messy, dirty, nasty, rough and rude things from time to time. However; in this story we see that every time Edwardo does something bad he is yelled at and he is told that he is extremely rude, rough or clumsy all leading up to him being ‘the Horriblest Boy in the Whole Wide World’. This was until a man mentioned that his bad deed of kicking a flower pot to break it was probably just Edwardo’s attempts to build a garden. The adults have a strong impact on how Edwardo looks at life and himself. Just like I do as future teacher, if you label a student as the roughest student you have ever seen they will form to that label. This story teaches to look at things in a positive way, not to focus on the negative behavior and not to label children. As a teacher I can take away from this story that it is my responsibility as the adult to build my students up rather than push them down with the language I chose. ( )
  Kbenis1 | Oct 4, 2013 |
"Edwardo is an ordinary boy who does his best to live up to grown-ups' expectations. So when they rant at him for being the clumsiest, noisiest, nastiest, cruelest, messiest, and dirtiest boy in the whole wide world, he becomes all those things with a vengence, thus earning the title of the horriblest boy in the whole wide world. How Edwardo becomes the nicest boy in the whole wide world will be appreciated by ordinary little boys everywhere. John Burningham's amusing illustrations bring a lighthearted touch to the power of positive reinforcement."
Pierce College Library
Ages:3-7
  Marie89 | May 7, 2013 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0375840532, Hardcover)

Edwardo is an ordinary boy who does his best to live up to grown-ups' expectations. So when they rant at him for being the clumsiest, noisiest, nastiest, cruelest, messiest, and dirtiest boy in the whole wide world, he becomes all those things with a vengence, thus earning the title of the horriblest boy in the whole wide world. How Edwardo becomes the nicest boy in the whole wide world will be appreciated by ordinary little boys everywhere. John Burningham's amusing illustrations bring a lighthearted touch to the power of positive reinforcement.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:40:28 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

Each time he does something a little bit bad, Edwardo is told that he is very bad and soon his behavior is awful, but when he accidentally does good things and is complimented, he becomes much, much nicer.

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