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Rückzug: The German Retreat from…
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Rückzug: The German Retreat from France, 1944 (Foreign Military… (edition 2012)

by Joachim Ludewig, David T. Zabecki (Editor)

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195537,190 (4.3)1
Member:agingcow2345
Title:Rückzug: The German Retreat from France, 1944 (Foreign Military Studies)
Authors:Joachim Ludewig
Other authors:David T. Zabecki (Editor)
Info:The University Press of Kentucky (2012), Hardcover, 504 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
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Rückzug: The German Retreat from France, 1944 (Foreign Military Studies) by Joachim Ludewig

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Based on a thesis written in the late 1980s and submitted in 1990. Interesting information on German side, although some of the arguments and assertions regarding Allied activities are a bit wide of the mark, especially in light of the last 25 years-worth of writing.
  JonSowden | Aug 8, 2014 |
To be honest, when I found that the author had been something of a protege of Andreas Hillgruber (notorious for his attempts to bring respectability to the German war effort in WWII), I almost set this book aside. I will also allow that I'm not especially impressed with with Ludewig's efforts to criticize how Eisenhower and Montgomery practiced operational art, their lapses were also not news even at the time this book was first published in 1994. However, if you are looking for a close analysis of the German moves on the ground in the West in the Summer of '44 (under the direction of Field Marshal Model) you will find a great deal of useful information. Probably the kindest thing I can say about this work is that after being produced a generation ago it does feel a bit dated, particular since Ludewig also indulges in some of the special pleading of his mentor; save me from misplaced German victimhood. ( )
  Shrike58 | Dec 1, 2013 |
Quite possibly, the most data dense and well validated review of the critical series of strategic and tactical decisions, battles, skirmishes that comprised the German retreat from France and Belgium. Incredibly detailed and cogently written, it is one of the best WW2 histories that I have read. Excellent insights into German leadership echelons from HItler down to the battalion level. I am eagerly looking forward to the third volume in Rick Atkinson's Liberation series that should encompass this area of conflict. ( )
1 vote jamespurcell | Dec 5, 2012 |
The core thesis of this book is that while Normandy through Falaise has been extensively covered in WW2 literature, there does not exist a definitive account of the great pursuit across France that followed, especially from the German POV. This book remedies this in a most excellent fashion. The account is strategic with significant operational detail. A few engagements are handled at the tactical level but mostly this book takes the larger view, concentrating on command decisions, logistics and conflicts between levels of command. The Allied side is covered more in a sense of missed opportunities as the Allies consistently underperform relative to German expectations, especially as regards the failure to exploit the seizure of Antwerp by making the clearing of the Scheldt a priority and allowing the German army task force G to escape from southern France mostly intact. The book also shows that from the end of August into the autumn Hitler sent the bulk of his last callup of divisions west not east. Hitler regarded the Western Front as the decisive sector and allocated his resources accordingly. The book end with the return to positional warfare as the mobile phase of the campaign ended. This is an excellent addition to any WW2 library and has value besides that as a study of higher command in mobile warfare. ( )
  agingcow2345 | Nov 29, 2012 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 081314079X, Hardcover)

The Allied invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944, marked a critical turning point in the European theater of World War II. The massive landing on France's coast had been meticulously planned for three years, and the Allies anticipated a quick and decisive defeat of the German forces. Many of the planners were surprised, however, by the length of time it ultimately took to defeat the Germans.

While much has been written about D-day, very little has been written about the crucial period from August to September, immediately after the invasion. In Rückzug, Joachim Ludewig draws on military records from both sides to show that a quick defeat of the Germans was hindered by excessive caution and a lack of strategic boldness on the part of the Allies, as well as by the Germans' tactical skill and energy. This intriguing study, translated from German, not only examines a significant and often overlooked phase of the war, but also offers a valuable account of the conflict from the perspective of the German forces.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:43:00 -0400)

The Allied invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944, marked a critical turning point in the European theater of World War II. While the D-day invasion has been throughly researched and examined, the crucial period following the invasion, from August to September, has been largely ignored. Offering a valuable account of the conflict from the perspective of the German forces, 'Ruckzug' draws on both Allied and German military records to show that a quick defeat of the Germans was hindered by excessive caution and lack of strategic boldness on the part of the Allies, as well as by the Germans' tactical skill and energy.… (more)

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