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Learning About Friendship: Stories to…
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Learning About Friendship: Stories to Support Social Skills Training in… (edition 2010)

by K. I. Al-ghani, Haitham Al-ghani (Illustrator)

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Member:ACCTSheffield
Title:Learning About Friendship: Stories to Support Social Skills Training in Children With Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism
Authors:K. I. Al-ghani
Other authors:Haitham Al-ghani (Illustrator)
Info:Jessica Kingsley Pub (2010), Edition: 1, Paperback, 144 pages
Collections:Your library
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Tags:Social Stories, Friendships, Asperger's Syndrome, High Functioning Autism

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Learning About Friendship: Stories to Support Social Skills Training in Children With Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism by K. I. Al-Ghani

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Amazon.co.uk - "Making friends can be a challenge for all children, but those with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) can struggle more than most. This collection of ten fully illustrated stories explores friendship issues encountered by children with ASD aged four to eight and looks at how they can be overcome successfully. Key problem areas are addressed, including sharing, taking turns, being a tattletale, obsessions, winning and losing, jealousy, personal space, tact and diplomacy, and defining friendship. The lively and entertaining stories depersonalise issues, allowing children to see situations from the perspective of others and enabling them to recognise themselves in the characters. This opens the door to discussion, which in turn leads to useful insight and strategies they can practise and implement in the future. Each story has a separate introduction for adults which explains the main strategies within it. This book will be a valuable resource for all parents and teachers of children with ASD, along with their friends and families, and anybody else looking to help children on the spectrum to understand, make and maintain friendships."
  ACCTSheffield | Dec 15, 2012 |
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FICTION DEALING WITH SPECIFIC ISSUES. Making friends can be a challenge for all children, but those with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) can struggle more than most. This collection of ten fully illustrated stories explores friendship issues encountered by children with ASD aged 4 to 8 and looks at how they can be overcome successfully. Key problem areas are tackled, including sharing, taking turns, being a tattletale, obsessions, winning and losing, being taken advantage of, jealousy, personal space, personal hygiene, tact and diplomacy, and defining friendship. The friendly story format depersonalises issues, allowing children to see situations from the perspective of others and enabling them to recognise themselves in the characters. This opens the door to discussion, which in turn leads to useful insight and strategies they can practise and implement in the future. Ages 4+.… (more)

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