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The Borgias: The Hidden History by G. J.…
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The Borgias: The Hidden History (2013)

by G. J. Meyer

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Showing 1-5 of 54 (next | show all)
Intriguing retelling of the Borgia history. I enjoyed the book, and would recommend it to anyone with a thing for Italian/papal history, but there was something that really bugged me about the author's voice. I still haven't put my finger on it... ( )
  gossamerchild88 | Mar 30, 2018 |
An excellent, detailed account of the Borgia family its beginnings to the very end challenging deep-rooted preconceptions about the family. ( )
  EroticsOfThought | Feb 27, 2018 |
A very interesting and thought-provoking book that takes the thesis that the Borgias get a "bum rap" from history. The big winner in this is Lucrezia Borgia, whose reputation, based on the available evidence, is almost completely overblown; there are, in fact, no real incidents of evil that can be ascribed to her, according to the author. The author also argues that Pope Alexander VI and Cesare Borgia did not have reputations that were outlandish by the standards of the time, low as they were. The only thing that can weary you is the enormous complexity of the squabbles over territory, and the endless crossing, double-crossing and triple-crossing that goes on. ( )
  EricCostello | Jan 8, 2018 |
Interesting book and I learned a lot about the period but there was too much about other popes too little about the Borgias. ( )
  Elysianfield | Nov 16, 2016 |
According to the author; the Borgias have received a bum rap from historians. Usually thought of as a family of poisoners, thieves, murders, and libidinous Popes; the history of the Borgias is based primarily on recounts of enemies and hearsay. The author has based his decision on as much archival evidence he could find in repositories all over the world. The book is not an easy read for the author presents the case against the authors of the slanderous material and then a clarification of what really happened. You have to be very interested in the Borgias to make your way through all the evidence. ( )
  ShelleyAlberta | Jun 4, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 54 (next | show all)
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For Eric, Ellen and Sarah Who have always made everything meaningful and worthwhile
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It is the third of April, and springtime is in full force. We are in Rome, wich in this year of 1455 is neither the gloriousw world capital it had been under the emperors of old, nor the great city it will become once again in a few generations. Instead it is a dilapidated backwater of thirty or perhaps forty thousand souls.
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Book description
The startling truth behind one of the most notorious dynasties in history is revealed in a remarkable new account by the acclaimed author of The Tudors and A World Undone. Sweeping aside the gossip, slander, and distortion that have shrouded the Borgias for centuries, G. J. Meyer offers an unprecedented portrait of the infamous Renaissance family and their storied milieu.

They burst out of obscurity in Spain not only to capture the great prize of the papacy, but to do so twice. Throughout a tumultuous half-century—as popes, statesmen, warriors, lovers, and breathtakingly ambitious political adventurers—they held center stage in the glorious and blood-drenched pageant known to us as the Italian Renaissance, standing at the epicenter of the power games in which Europe’s kings and Italy’s warlords gambled for life-and-death stakes.

Five centuries after their fall—a fall even more sudden than their rise to the heights of power—they remain immutable symbols of the depths to which humanity can descend: Rodrigo Borgia, who bought the papal crown and prostituted the Roman Church; Cesare Borgia, who became first a teenage cardinal and then the most treacherous cutthroat of a violent time; Lucrezia Borgia, who was as shockingly immoral as she was beautiful. These have long been stock figures in the dark chronicle of European villainy, their name synonymous with unspeakable evil.

But did these Borgias of legend actually exist? Grounding his narrative in exhaustive research and drawing from rarely examined key sources, Meyer brings fascinating new insight to the real people within the age-encrusted myth. Equally illuminating is the light he shines on the brilliant circles in which the Borgias moved and the thrilling era they helped to shape, a time of wars and political convulsions that reverberate to the present day, when Western civilization simultaneously wallowed in appalling brutality and soared to extraordinary heights.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0345526910, Hardcover)

The startling truth behind one of the most notorious dynasties in history is revealed in a remarkable new account by the acclaimed author of The Tudors and A World Undone. Sweeping aside the gossip, slander, and distortion that have shrouded the Borgias for centuries, G. J. Meyer offers an unprecedented portrait of the infamous Renaissance family and their storied milieu.
 
THE BORGIAS
 
They burst out of obscurity in Spain not only to capture the great prize of the papacy, but to do so twice. Throughout a tumultuous half-century—as popes, statesmen, warriors, lovers, and breathtakingly ambitious political adventurers—they held center stage in the glorious and blood-drenched pageant known to us as the Italian Renaissance, standing at the epicenter of the power games in which Europe’s kings and Italy’s warlords gambled for life-and-death stakes.
 
Five centuries after their fall—a fall even more sudden than their rise to the heights of power—they remain immutable symbols of the depths to which humanity can descend: Rodrigo, the Borgia who bought the papal crown and prostituted the Roman Church; Cesare, the Borgia who became first a teenage cardinal and then the most treacherous cutthroat of a violent time; Lucrezia, the Borgia as shockingly immoral as she was beautiful. These have long been stock figures in the dark chronicle of European villainy, their name synonymous with unspeakable evil.
 
But did these Borgias of legend actually exist? Grounding his narrative in exhaustive research and drawing from rarely examined key sources, Meyer brings fascinating new insight to the real people within the age-encrusted myth. Equally illuminating is the light he shines on the brilliant circles in which the Borgias moved and the thrilling era they helped to shape, a time of wars and political convulsions that reverberate to the present day, when Western civilization simultaneously wallowed in appalling brutality and soared to extraordinary heights. Stunning in scope, rich in telling detail, G. J. Meyer’s The Borgias is an indelible work sure to become the new standard on a family and a world that continue to enthrall.
 
Praise for G. J. Meyer’s The Tudors
 
“Energetic and comprehensive . . . [a] sweeping history of the gloriously infamous Tudor era . . . Unlike the somewhat ponderous British biographies of the Henrys, Elizabeths and Boleyns that seem to pop up perennially, Meyer displays some flashy, fresh irreverence [and cuts] to the quick of the action.”—Kirkus Reviews
 
“[A] cheeky, nuanced, and authoritative perspective . . . brims with enriching background discussions.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review)
 
“Both serious students of sixteenth-century England and those with a passing interest in the period will find The Tudors by G. J. Meyer a comprehensive look at that momentous span of history. . . . The book is also a refreshing reality-check grounded in fact after the entertaining fictions of the recent past.”—Seattle Post-Intelligencer

“A thoroughly readable and often compelling narrative.”—Associated Press
 
“A rich and vibrant tapestry.”—The Star-Ledger

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:01 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Sweeping aside the gossip, slander, and distortion that have shrouded the Borgias for centuries, G. J. Meyer offers an unprecedented portrait of the infamous Renaissance family and their storied milieu. They burst out of obscurity in Spain to capture the great prize of the papacy, not once but twice. Throughout a tumultuous half-century--as popes, statesmen, warriors, lovers, and breathtakingly ambitious political adventurers--they held center stage in the glorious and blood-drenched pageant known to us as the Italian Renaissance. Five centuries after their fall--a fall even more sudden than their rise to the heights of power--they remain symbols of the depths to which humanity can descend: Rodrigo, who bought the papal crown and prostituted the Roman Church; Cesare, who became the most treacherous cutthroat of a violent time; Lucrezia, as immoral as she was beautiful. But did these Borgias of legend actually exist? Grounding his narrative in exhaustive research and drawing from rarely examined key sources, Meyer brings fascinating new insight to the real people within the age-encrusted myth. Equally illuminating is the light he shines on the brilliant circles in which the Borgias moved and the thrilling era they helped to shape.--From publisher description.… (more)

» see all 4 descriptions

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