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Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
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Steve Jobs (original 2011; edition 2011)

by Walter Isaacson

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6,503232971 (4.14)76
Based on more than forty interviews with Jobs conducted over two years, as well as interviews with more than a hundred family members, friends, adversaries, competitors, and colleagues, the author has written a riveting story of the roller-coaster life and searingly intense personality of a creative entrepreneur whose passion for perfection and ferocious drive revolutionized six industries: personal computers, animated movies, music, phones, tablet computing, and digital publishing. At a time when America is seeking ways to sustain its innovative edge, and when societies around the world are trying to build digital-age economies, Jobs stands as the ultimate icon of inventiveness and applied imagination. He knew that the best way to create value in the twenty-first century was to connect creativity with technology. He built a company where leaps of the imagination were combined with remarkable feats of engineering. Although Jobs cooperated with this book, he asked for no control over what was written nor even the right to read it before it was published. He put nothing off-limits. He encouraged the people he knew to speak honestly. And Jobs speaks candidly, sometimes brutally so, about the people he worked with and competed against. His friends, foes, and colleagues provide an unvarnished view of the passions, perfectionism, obsessions, artistry, devilry, and compulsion for control that shaped his approach to business and the innovative products that resulted. Driven by demons, Jobs could drive those around him to fury and despair. But his personality and products were interrelated, just as Apple's hardware and software tended to be, as if part of an integrated system. His tale is instructive and cautionary, filled with lessons about innovation, character, leadership, and values. -- From publisher.… (more)
Member:ThinkingGuy
Title:Steve Jobs
Authors:Walter Isaacson
Info:New York : Simon & Schuster, 2011.
Collections:Your library
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Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson (2011)

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Showing 1-5 of 217 (next | show all)
A very detailed and unbiased look at Steve Jobs, his life before Apple, and then his time at and away from the company he co-founded. Isaacson does a good job of showing Jobs at his best, but also at his worst. While a visionary, Jobs was also pretty much a man who ignored truths when it suited him and berated and attacked subordinates and contemporaries. I wonder how far he would have gotten if the awareness and cultural sensitivities of today had been in place in the 1970's and 80's, because CEOs today using many of the same 'techniques' that Jobs used are being fired and removed from companies they have founded. If you want to know the man behind the myth then I recommend this book. ( )
  GeoffHabiger | Dec 15, 2019 |
I was around for most of this history but didn't pay that close of attention. I knew of Steve on the surface and went through my cycle of "iPods are pretty cool", "I'll buy a Mac because of OSX", to "Steve's an asshole" and "I hate Apple".

I'm a geek at heart, so the decisions to make closed products offended me. However, after reading this, I now UNDERSTAND, which is the piece I was missing. I "get" Steve now. I don't necessarily agree with who he was, but I understand when he told people suggesting a change that "that's who I am".

I can only hope that others who care as deeply about what they are doing get a chance to "change the world" as Steve did.
( )
  CraigTreptow | Dec 9, 2019 |
I found the first 2/3rds of the books very interesting. I think the last third is less compelling because it covers recent history which is well known, because there were fewer insights into why Jobs was how he was, and perhaps because it was rushed(?).

Besides his personality and vision, which have been well documented, I found the most interesting point to be Jobs' interest in building an enduring company and culture. Businessmen are often derided as pencil pushes, but this side of Jobs' shows the creative energy needed to build a company. He approached Apple as he would a product, constantly pruning fluff (both product lines and people), and laying out a vision and expecting the company to meet it. Companies are difficult to build, it took Jos many tries before he got the balance right. ( )
  spencerjogden | Dec 3, 2019 |
This is a detailed account of Steve Jobs life. I listened to 20 CDs on this book. I found the information interesting and informative. I learned a lot about his life and although I don’t think I would like him, I appreciate his genius and intensity. I wish that he had been a nicer person but he was who he was. ( )
  GlennBell | Nov 13, 2019 |
Great snapshot of this man. Especially intriguing to tech folks, I would imagine, since you can appreciate the technical progress that he made. ( )
  ahamel | Sep 25, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 217 (next | show all)
Steve Jobs dreamed of a legacy that awed people. He wanted to be in the pantheon of great product innovators, indeed surpassing Edwin Land and even his early icons William Hewitt and David Packard. But, Jobs created more than great products. Just as significant was his ability to create great companies with valuable brands. And, he created two of the best of his era: Apple and Pixar.
 
Isaacson’s book is long, dull, often flat-footed, and humorless. It hammers on one nail, incessantly: that Steve Jobs was an awful man, but awful in the service of products people really liked (and eventually bought lots of) and so in the end his awfulness was probably OK. It is not Isaacson’s fault that Jobs from early on had a “admixture of sensitivity and insensitivity, bristliness and detachment,” as Isaacson describes it, or that Jobs abandoned friends, thought almost everyone else was a shithead, showed little interest in his daughters, and made life generally miserable for anyone who had to provide a good or service to him. But it is Isaacson’s fault that the biography is so narrowly focused on one moral theme. The reader is left to judge, with plenty of evidence both ways—and a clear idea of where Isaacson’s sympathies lie—whether Jobs deserves the Artist’s Exemption.
added by Shortride | editn+1, Gary Sernovitz (Dec 20, 2011)
 
As Walter Isaacson says in this incisive biography, Jobs behaved like a Nietzschean superman, using his will – transmitted through an unblinking stare – as a remote-control device that compelled others to do his bidding.
added by SqueakyChu | editThe Guardian, Peter Conrad (Oct 30, 2011)
 
While Jobs was a vigorous competitor, he also came to view himself as an elder statesman with a responsibility for giving advice to Google’s Page, Facebook Inc. CEO Mark Zuckerberg and other emerging technology executives, according to “Steve Jobs,” an authorized biography by Walter Isaacson and published by CBS Corp. (CBS)’s Simon & Schuster. It goes on sale Oct. 24.
added by Serviette | editBloomberg, Adam Satariano (Oct 22, 2011)
 
Mr. Isaacson treats “Steve Jobs” as the biography of record, which means that it is a strange book to read so soon after its subject’s death. Some of it is an essential Silicon Valley chronicle, compiling stories well known to tech aficionados but interesting to a broad audience. Some of it is already quaint. Mr. Jobs’s first job was at Atari, and it involved the game Pong. (“If you’re under 30, ask your parents,” Mr. Isaacson writes.) Some, like an account of the release of the iPad 2, is so recent that it is hard to appreciate yet, even if Mr. Isaacson says the device comes to life “like the face of a tickled baby.”
added by LiteraryFiction | editNew York Times, Janet Maslin (pay site) (Oct 21, 2011)
 

» Add other authors (84 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Walter Isaacsonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Gittinger, AntoinetteÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Grasmück, OliverÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mallett, DagmarÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Martin, ElfiÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stumpf, AndreaÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Werbeck, GabrieleÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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The people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world are the ones who do. -- Apple's "Think Different" commercial, 1997
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(Introduction - How This Book Came to Be) In the early summer of 2004, I got a phone call from Steve Jobs.
When Paul Jobs was mustered out of the Coast Guard after World War II, he made a wager with his crewmates.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
À partir d'une quarantaine d'interviews exclusives et de multiples rencontres avec sa famille , ses proches , ses collaborateurs , ses amis comme ses adversaires , l'auteur a constitué d'une façon magistrale et passionnée la vie , l'œuvre et la pensée d'un des plus grands innovateurs et visionnaires de notre époque .

Based on more than forty interviews with Jobs conducted over two years—as well as interviews with more than a hundred family members, friends, adversaries, competitors, and colleagues—Walter Isaacson has written a riveting story of the roller-coaster life and searingly intense personality of a creative entrepreneur whose passion for perfection and ferocious drive revolutionized six industries: personal computers, animated movies, music, phones, tablet computing, and digital publishing.

At a time when America is seeking ways to sustain its innovative edge, and when societies around the world are trying to build digital-age economies, Jobs stands as the ultimate icon of inventiveness and applied imagination. He knew that the best way to create value in the twenty-first century was to connect creativity with technology. He built a company where leaps of the imagination were combined with remarkable feats of engineering.

Although Jobs cooperated with this book, he asked for no control over what was written nor even the right to read it before it was published. He put nothing off-limits. He encouraged the people he knew to speak honestly. And Jobs speaks candidly, sometimes brutally so, about the people he worked with and competed against. His friends, foes, and colleagues provide an unvarnished view of the passions, perfectionism, obsessions, artistry, devilry, and compulsion for control that shaped his approach to business and the innovative products that resulted.

Driven by demons, Jobs could drive those around him to fury and despair. But his personality and products were interrelated, just as Apple’s hardware and software tended to be, as if part of an integrated system. His tale is instructive and cautionary, filled with lessons about innovation, character, leadership, and values.
Haiku summary
Steven P. Jobs/Innovative, genius mind/Rough around the edge(njvroom)

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