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Penny and Her Marble (I Can Read Level 1) by…
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Penny and Her Marble (I Can Read Level 1) (edition 2013)

by Kevin Henkes (Author)

Series: Penny and her . . . (3), I Can Read Books (Level 1)

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6342526,194 (4.11)None
Penny feels guilty after taking a beautiful blue marble that she sees in Mrs. Goodwin's grass, but gets a pleasant surprise when she goes to return it the next day.
Member:lj_library
Title:Penny and Her Marble (I Can Read Level 1)
Authors:Kevin Henkes (Author)
Info:Greenwillow Books (2013), 48 pages
Collections:Your library
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Penny and Her Marble I Can Read by Kevin Henkes

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Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
In this book, Henkes shows how children use their imagination to take them to other places. He illustrates Penny's imagination taking over reality as she strolls her doll down the sidewalk. I like this book because I think that it is important that children use their imagination. I also like how Henkes teaches the lesson of not taking something that isn't yours in a very light and innocent way. ( )
  BMayeux | Mar 26, 2019 |
Penny is out walking her doll Rose when she finds a shiny, bright blue marble in Mrs. Goodwin's front yard. She picks it up and takes it home, but is then consumed by guilt and returns it - only to have Mrs. Goodwin encourage her to keep it. ( )
  JennyArch | Oct 15, 2018 |
Penny finds a marble in her neighbor's yard. She knows that she shouldn't take it without asking, She deals with the hard decision of coming clean to her neighbor even though she may have never even noticed it was gone.
  mmoga | Aug 15, 2018 |
In preparation for a Mock-Geisel workshop (in which a clatter of librarians will read, fiercely compare and judge books for early readers), I read this (among various other early reader titles) to my K-1s, the intended audience. Readaloud is not likely the intended means of delivery, but this title stood out to both me and the Primaries.

Penny is taking her doll, Rose, out for a stroll & comes upon a shiny blue marble at the edge of her elderly neighbor's lawn. Penny purloins said treasure and experiences the exact guilt and anxiety that I saw expressed on the 20 faces I read to today. Penny adores the marble; it is the exact color of the beautiful blue sky. The children empathized entirely with Penny's anxiety over her taking, keeping, and ultimately returning the marble.

For an adult reader, there are no surprises here. For a first-grader, though, this title hits the mark. Every child could envision him- or herself in Penny's conflicted position. Every easy-to-read, cadenced word rang true for the intended audience. Every page turn, chapter break and nuance (and there is nuance!) rang true. This easy reader--short, leveled, and potent--has chops. ( )
  msmilton | Jul 18, 2018 |
In preparation for a Mock-Geisel workshop (in which a clatter of librarians will read, fiercely compare and judge books for early readers), I read this (among various other early reader titles) to my K-1s, the intended audience. Readaloud is not likely the intended means of delivery, but this title stood out to both me and the Primaries.

Penny is taking her doll, Rose, out for a stroll & comes upon a shiny blue marble at the edge of her elderly neighbor's lawn. Penny purloins said treasure and experiences the exact guilt and anxiety that I saw expressed on the 20 faces I read to today. Penny adores the marble; it is the exact color of the beautiful blue sky. The children empathized entirely with Penny's anxiety over her taking, keeping, and ultimately returning the marble.

For an adult reader, there are no surprises here. For a first-grader, though, this title hits the mark. Every child could envision him- or herself in Penny's conflicted position. Every easy-to-read, cadenced word rang true for the intended audience. Every page turn, chapter break and nuance (and there is nuance!) rang true. This easy reader--short, leveled, and potent--has chops. ( )
  msmilton | Jul 18, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
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Penny feels guilty after taking a beautiful blue marble that she sees in Mrs. Goodwin's grass, but gets a pleasant surprise when she goes to return it the next day.

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