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Rage against the dying by Becky Masterman
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Rage against the dying

by Becky Masterman

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2823239,987 (3.81)15
Member:Dabble58
Title:Rage against the dying
Authors:Becky Masterman
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Rating:*****
Tags:mysteries, gripping books, exciting

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Rage Against the Dying by Becky Masterman

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Showing 1-5 of 32 (next | show all)
Low score cuz it's filled with cheesy writing but I enjoyed it and enjoyed the feminist bent on the story SO MUCH. Would that it were more common. ( )
  wordlikeabell | Apr 17, 2016 |
Retired FBI agent Brigid Quinn is newly-married to a wonderfully kind man unaware of major elements of her past, such as the fact that she retired under pressure after killing an unarmed suspect. Now living in Tucson and trying to be a perfect wife, Brigid finds herself embroiled in the serial killer case she never solved. Delightful, engrossing, and poignant, Rage Against The Dying is not the average long-haul trucker/serial killer novel that it could have been. I read it all one day and one evening until I finished it, leaving it only at meal times, and was wowed by the way that Masterman transformed what is becoming a trope in serial killer tales into something unique, something that felt personal, a bonding to the agent who never tells her secrets to anyone. It's hard to believe that this was a first novel, and I've already ordered the second. Great book; I highly recommend it. ( )
  ahef1963 | Jan 21, 2016 |
Delighted to find this first-time mystery-thriller, which appeared on seven “best of” lists for 2013. At first, I thought, “Oh no, not another story about long-haul truckers and their women victims,” but the book soon took a sharp turn away from that tired track, and we discover the would-be victim is a retired FBI agent with certain skills.
The agent is Brigid Quinn, asked informally to help put to rest an old case—the murder of her young trainee by the “Route 66 killer.” A man has confessed to this string of murders and told authorities where to find the agent’s body. But the FBI agent in charge of the case doubts the confession and persuades Quinn to doubt it, too. Meanwhile, the real killer is out there . . . and no one but the two of them appears to care whether he’s caught.
The book uses its Tucson setting to advantage, and Quinn shines hard as a diamond in it. Her first-person narrative is “chilling, smart, funny, and what a voice she has,” said Gillian Flynn, author of Gone Girl. The narration was perfect. Cheers to both Masterman and Kaye. Looking forward to reading the second book in the series, out now! ( )
  Vicki_Weisfeld | Nov 3, 2015 |
Our introduction to Brigid Quinn in the prologue of Rage Against the Dying is a memorable one. When prologue flows into first chapter, we know we are embarking on a journey with an unforgettable character. Brigid Quinn is fierce, uncompromising, and unflinchingly original. She is as far from being a normal "woman of a certain age" as the Earth is from Saturn. She's seen too much, and she's done too much; but what put me firmly in her camp come what may is the fact that this intelligent, strong woman looking sixty straight in the eye is an almost complete novice at relationships with other people. Every hero should have a flaw, and Brigid's carries the potential for a lot of damage.

The man she's fallen in love with is a wonderful character, and although we see him through Brigid's eyes, we're given hints that he isn't quite the man she believes him to be. This fledgling relationship adds so much to the story!

Speaking of the story-- it's completely engrossing. Once I started reading, I didn't come up for air until I'd turned the last page. The hunt for the killer and the killer's final reveal? Fabulous. When I was finished reading, I sat for a few minutes with my eyes closed, simply holding the book and savoring what I'd just experienced. What fuels me as a reader are characters and stories. Becky Masterman has delivered both in superb style. Now I'm an addict and getting my hands on the next Brigid Quinn book has become a necessity! ( )
  cathyskye | Jul 16, 2015 |
In the opening of Rage Against the Dying, an older woman is attacked by a serial killer who has a ‘thing’ for granny types. Thing is though this older woman isn’t your usual middle-aged victim – she’s 59-year-old Brigid Quinn, retired FBI agent, who is more than a match for any predator despite her gray hair. When the proverbial fan gets hit, Quinn is left with a dead guy and, although it was a clear case of self-defense, she is afraid that if she explains what happened to her new husband and ex-priest he couldn’t handle it. So she walks away hoping that somehow her role won’t be discovered – of course, this will come back to bite her.

Then she receives a call from agent Laura Coleman about another crime, the Route 66 killer, ‘the one that got away’ in Quinn’s long career and who has haunted her ever since. A suspect has been apprehended who seems to have real knowledge about the murders, stuff that was never released to the public. However, Coleman doesn’t think he did it and, after meeting him, Quinn also has doubts. Now, Coleman is missing and Quinn is convinced that she is another victim of Route 66 but she can’t convince anyone of the fact. Worse, she is now a suspect in the murder of the man she killed and, since she not only didn’t report the incident, she has lied about her role, it’s going to be damn near impossible to claim self-defense. She is forced to go on the run from both the FBI and a serial killer stalker hoping she can solve the case before one or the other catches up with her.

Rage Against the Dying by author Becky Masterson makes for some very fun reading mainly down to Quinn who makes it clear that older women can be just as interesting and feisty, not to mention hot, as the usual young heroines of thrillers – she is, by her own definition, a kick-ass-take-names kind of woman and she lives up to the hype. My one criticism - I admit I found the part about her doomed efforts to keep her encounter with the serial killer from her husband somewhat problematic – one would think that someone who is married to an FBI agent, even a retired one, would have some idea of what they do for a living. But that aside, Rage Against the Dying is a real roller coaster of a ride. Overall, a pretty decent read.

3.5 ( )
  lostinalibrary | Jun 5, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 32 (next | show all)
Ms. Masterman is oddly but well qualified to write such a story. She’s an editor of medical textbooks for forensic examiners and law enforcement, but that expertise does not make “Rage Against the Dying” ghoulish. Or not too ghoulish, and not pornographic about death. It’s just that bodies abandoned in desert heat tend to mummify. And the creep Brigid winds up pursuing has a necrophiliac yen for women who are dry, leathery and long dead.
added by ozzer | editNew York Times, Janet Maslin (Mar 7, 2013)
 

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Becky Mastermanprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Orlic, OlgaCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For Frederick J. Masterman, my husband and writing partner, finally
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312622945, Hardcover)

You have never met an (ex) FBI agent like Brigid Quinn

“Keeping secrets, telling lies, they require the same skill. Both become a habit, almost an addiction, that’s hard to break even with the people closest to you, out of the business. For example, they say never trust a woman who tells you her age; if she can’t keep that secret, she can’t keep yours. I’m fifty-nine.”

Brigid Quinn's experiences in hunting sexual predators for the FBI have left her with memories she wishes she didn’t have and lethal skills she hopes never to need again. Having been pushed into early retirement by events she thinks she's put firmly behind her, Brigid keeps telling herself she is settling down nicely in Tucson with a wonderful new husband, Carlo, and their dogs.

But the past intervenes when a man named Floyd Lynch confesses to the worst unsolved case of Brigid’s career—the disappearance and presumed murder of her young protégée, Jessica. Floyd knows things about that terrible night that were never made public, and offers to lead the cops to Jessica's body in return for a plea bargain.

It should finally be the end of a dark chapter in Brigid’s life. Except…the new FBI agent on the case, Laura Coleman, thinks the confession is fake, and Brigid finds she cannot walk away from violence and retribution after all, no matter what the cost.

With a fiercely original and compelling voice, Becky Masterman's Rage Against the Dying marks the heart-stopping debut of a brilliant new thriller writer.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:37 -0400)

"Keeping secrets, telling lies, they require the same skill. Both become a habit, almost an addiction, that's hard to break even with the people closest to you, out of the business. For example, they say never trust a woman who tells you her age; if she can't keep that secret, she can't keep yours. I'm fifty-nine." Brigid Quinn's experiences in hunting sexual predators for the FBI have left her with memories she wishes she didn't have and lethal skills she hopes never to need again. Having been pushed into early retirement by events she thinks she's put firmly behind her, Brigid keeps telling herself she is settling down nicely in Tucson with a wonderful new husband, Carlo, and their dogs. But the past intervenes when a man named Floyd Lynch confesses to the worst unsolved case of Brigid's career--the disappearance and presumed murder of her young protegee, Jessica. Floyd knows things about that terrible night that were never made public, and offers to lead the cops to Jessica's body in return for a plea bargain. It should finally be the end of a dark chapter in Brigid's life. Except...the new FBI agent on the case, Laura Coleman, thinks the confession is fake, and Brigid finds she cannot walk away from violence and retribution after all, no matter what the cost. With a fiercely original and compelling voice, Becky Masterman's Rage Against the Dying marks the heart-stopping debut of a brilliant new thriller writer"--… (more)

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