HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Bolero (A Nick Sayler Novel) by Joanie…
Loading...

Bolero (A Nick Sayler Novel) (edition 2013)

by Joanie McDonell

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
205515,329 (3.44)None
Member:Darcia
Title:Bolero (A Nick Sayler Novel)
Authors:Joanie McDonell
Info:Thomas & Mercer (2013), Paperback, 374 pages
Collections:Early Reviews and Giveaways, Mystery/Supense/Thriller, Fiction
Rating:*****
Tags:None

Work details

Bolero (A Nick Sayler Novel) by Joanie McDonell

None

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 5 of 5
Nick Sayler is a private investigator who takes on the case of a Jane Doe, a beautiful woman who has lost her memory and is about to be committed to a notorious psychiatric facility. Nick takes her to his home on a barge on the Jersey side of the Hudson River. That night an intruder breaks into the barge and confronts one of the Nick’s closest friends. From there the action builds as Nick, his friends and the police struggle to identify both the woman and her attackers.

I found this to be a well-crafted story with believable characters, including his friends, the savant Albert Meriwether, the wealthy former doctor Edward Sloane, and Nick’s absent girlfriend, Rue, whose promised return keeps him from straying with his beautiful client. Then there are the usual hard-nosed NYPD detectives, Tom Fallon and Linda Goode, who initially try to bring Nick and his client in for questioning but eventually provide cover and assistance.

From my perspective, there were a few minor imperfections, e.g. the British Royal family have corgis not spaniels and “loo” is common in the English speaking world outside North America. Also as the Khyber Pass is between Pakistan and Afghanistan, I find it a little strange that Indians would frequent a restaurant with such a name, especially as the real Khyber Pass restaurant in New York appears to be an Afghan restaurant. I thought it a little unusual to almost completely hide the identity of the perpetrators and their motives until the very end, but this did not detract from my enjoyment of the story. In fact, I was so attracted to this story that I finished this book in 3 sittings. This is a great start to a promising new series and career. I highly recommend this book to lovers of both crime/mystery and thrillers. ( )
  Bruce_McNair | Feb 25, 2014 |
I wanted to like it. I tried to like it. I just couldn't get into it. Good story and premise and the writing is not bad I just couldn't connect with the characters. It happens. ( )
  groundedforlife | Oct 9, 2013 |
Snappy, efficient, made-for-TV cops'n'robbers caper which did manage to keep me reading until the end. Unfortunately, the plot relies too heavily on a simply unbelievable case of total amnesia. And the secondary characters are borrowed from those two impeccable sources of realism, Artemis Fowl and Magnum PI.

Unconvincing, but readable tosh. ( )
  jtck121166 | Aug 27, 2013 |
I acquired "Bolero" as the result of an ad on my Kindle, and I didn't research it properly; that won't happen again. Then I got to a point in the book where I just wanted it to end yet I kept plodding through, instead of quitting and saving my time; that won't happen again. As for the story, Nick Saylor is a PI who lives on a converted barge on the Hudson River near Weehawken. He answers a phone call and commits to helping an amnesia victim who has been brutally attacked, apparently the intended third victim of a serial killer. And we have our first cliche, the amnesia victim who forgets everything, conveniently. There are several other cliches, including a hero who has a damaged leg and seems to drink too much. By the way every time he talks about getting a drink, he just doesn't refer to it as a "drink" we have to hear the brand name, Jameson (my Kindle says it was mentioned 17 times - I wonder if books have product placement fees like movies). Another cliche - Nick is pining for Julia, his one true love, dead the past ten years (note to author - guys don't pine for dead lovers for 10 years). And the amnesia victim looks like....guess who. And did I mention that Nick spent a lot of time during his troubled youth period getting straightened out by an order of nuns (and I just finished "The Other Typist" which deploys the nun cliche also). I did have a few other problems with the book. Too many characters seemed to be the world's best __________ (fill in the blank as appropriate). They were described as just about perfect in their chosen fields, few detectable flaws if any). Not sure what they were, but they weren't interesting, they weren't characters. Secondly, the cops-PI relationship didn't seem real - it was too friendly, too confiding. Much of the dialogue flowed well, but there were scenes where it felt stilted, especially between Nick and Julia where their exchanges seemed to morph into something from a romance novel. The climax was fine and there were some interesting factoids here and there but I still can't recommend "Bolero" and I will not read the next in this series. ( )
  maneekuhi | Aug 7, 2013 |
Bolero is a fascinating story. Unlike many suspense and thriller novels that explore the gruesome details of the murders and the pursuit of the killer, this one delves more into the psychological and emotional journey of P.I. Nick Sayler. Written in first person, we are in Nick's head with an up close and personal view of his world. We feel the conflict pulling at him and the emotional turmoil he experiences along the way. Nick is a complicated guy with a complicated past. Like most of us, he drags a lot of baggage. This is often the story's focus, and it works well. I felt a connection with Nick, whose character is slightly damaged and very likable. ( )
  Darcia | Dec 7, 2012 |
Showing 5 of 5
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

Despite his bronze star, Nick Sayler was once a thief, junkie, and prime suspect in a murder case. Now he's a private investigator with a long list of rich clients and a good life... but there's not enough whiskey in the world to wash away acid-etched memories of Julia Carteret, the beautiful woman who took a bullet meant for him. When a dancer with no money, no memory, and nothing in her pocket except Sayler's card-- and the number 44 carved across her back-- shows up in the ER, Sayler thinks keeping her safe could put him back on the road to redemption.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

LibraryThing Author

Joanie McDonell is a LibraryThing Author, an author who lists their personal library on LibraryThing.

profile page | author page

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
2 pay3 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.44)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2 1
2.5
3 2
3.5 1
4 2
4.5
5 2

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 94,011,891 books! | Top bar: Always visible