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Martin's Dream: My Journey and the…
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Martin's Dream: My Journey and the Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.

by Clayborne Carson

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This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
In Martin's Dream, Clayborne Carson has written about his journey from the 1963 March on Washington, where Martin Luther King, Jr. gave his famous "I have a dream" speech, student activist with the civil rights movement through his involvement with SNCC (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee) and finally to his years as a scholar and editor of the King papers. This is really Carson's dream and King thought his eyes. But be aware that there is no bibliography or footnotes to fact check the material.

The most disturbing parts of the book were when Carson and his team discovered that King had not cited some of his sources properly, especially in his doctoral dissertation. The fallout and final resolution are discussed, including the dissatisfaction of Mrs. King and the rest of the family. There were also territorial issues over who had rights to the King papers, described in great detail.

I was fascinated by Carson's descriptions his play about King being produced in China and in Palestine as well as a chapter about Obama.

For those who want the life of MLK, Carson has edited his autobiography and there are many other works that can be read. But for a look at the life of an author and editor, this book is an excellent read. ( )
  fdholt | Jan 15, 2019 |
This true recalling of Martin Luther King's life journeys is a powerful story that can relate to 5th or 6th grade. Many interesting grand conversations can arise from the deep issues and concerns this story brings to surface. ( )
  Kdd026 | Apr 29, 2015 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I received this through the Library Thing Early Reviewers. I knew it wasn't necessarily about Martin Luther King, Jr directly, but I enjoyed the glimpses in his life the Clayborne Carson gained through is work on the King papers Project.

Before reading this, I knew only a broad overview of the Civil Rights Movement. I recognized some of the names and organizations discussed however I was more interested in Clayton's journey from an innocent 19 year old who personally witnessed the "I Have a Dream Speech" to an established historian and writer.

Seeing the journey through Clayton's eyes and reading this at a time when there is still inequality in the judicial system, it made me realize that there's still a long way to go for equality. ( )
  oraclejenn | Jan 29, 2015 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Like the reviewer below me as I type this, MARTIN'S DREAM was not what I expected -- for the same reason. I didn't pay close attention to the book's sub-title. Once I realized I wouldn't be learning much about Martin Luther King, Jr, I tried to focus what the book really was -- the author's journey from hitchhiking to to the "I Have Dream Speech" in Washington to becoming the curator of the King Papers Project to the place the author has reached as of today. Dr. Carson chronicles his journey from being torn about whether or not he wanted to get arrested during the Civil Rights protests to becoming a Stanford professor to his mixed relationship with the King Family as he attempted to navigate the tricky path to publishing the King Papers, to the dedication of the King Memorial on The Mall in Washington, DC. Throughout his journey, he has grown to appreciate the progress made (and the great distance yet to go) toward achieving Dr. King's dream. I believe he's been true to the spirit of preserving Dr. King's legacy through publishing his papers. It's hard to imagine what a daunting process that must be. ( )
  PolarBear | Sep 17, 2014 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
MARTIN’S DREAM was not what I expected, and proved to be a good reminder to pay attention to a book’s subtitle. This is, after all, a memoir; and true to its subtitle, it is about Clayborne Carson’s journey. it is not about Martin Luther King, Jr.

There is barely a mention of Dr. King until nearly a hundred pages into the book. Until then and throughout, it is a studied, accurate compilation of the author’s and the country’s activities leading up to and through the Civil Rights Movement, as well as, the coming into being of the King Papers Project. As such, it is a trustworthy if uninspiring reference of an important part of U.S. History. Far more compelling books have been written about the Civil Rights Movement, but the second half of the book that covers the development of the King Papers Project is not as well known. All of this was a bit overly careful and dry, although the book is well written. I'm sorry I didn't like it better. ( )
  scenik1 | Sep 7, 2014 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0230621694, Hardcover)

On August 28, 1963 hundreds of thousands of demonstrators flocked to the nation’s capital for the  March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech. It was Clayborne Carson’s first demonstration. A nineteen year old black student from a working-class family in New Mexico, Carson hitched a ride to Washington. Unsure how he would return home, he was nonetheless certain that he wanted to connect with the youthful protesters and community organizers who spearheaded the freedom struggle. Decades later, Coretta Scott King selected Dr. Carson—then a history professor at Stanford University-- to edit the papers of her late husband.

In this candid and engrossing memoir, he traces his evolution from political activist to activist scholar. He vividly recalls his involvement in the movement’s heyday and in the subsequent turbulent period when King’s visionary Dream became real for some and remained unfulfilled for others. He recounts his conversations with key African Americans of the past half century, including Black Power firebrand Stokely Carmichael and dedicated organizers such as Ella Baker and Bob Moses. His description of his long-term relationship with Coretta Scott King sheds new light on her crucial role in preserving and protecting her late husband’s legacy.

Written from the unique perspective of a renowned scholar, this highly readable account gives readers valuable new insights about the global significance of King’s inspiring ideas and his still unfolding legacy

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:06 -0400)

On August 28, 1963 hundreds of thousands of demonstrators flocked to the nation's capital for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his famous "I Have a Dream" speech. It was Clayborne Carson's first demonstration. A nineteen year old black student from a working-class family in New Mexico, Carson hitched a ride to Washington. Unsure how he would return home, he was nonetheless certain that he wanted to connect with the youthful protesters and community organizers who spearheaded the freedom struggle. Decades later, Coretta Scott King selected Dr. Carson--then a history professor at Stanford University-- to edit the papers of her late husband. In this candid and engrossing memoir, he traces his evolution from political activist to activist scholar. He vividly recalls his involvement in the movement's heyday and in the subsequent turbulent period when King's visionary Dream became real for some and remained unfulfilled for others. He recounts his conversations with key African Americans of the past half century, including Black Power firebrand Stokely Carmichael and dedicated organizers such as Ella Baker and Bob Moses. His description of his long-term relationship with Coretta Scott King sheds new light on her crucial role in preserving and protecting her late husband's legacy. Written from the unique perspective of a renowned scholar, this highly readable account gives readers valuable new insights about the global significance of King's inspiring ideas and his still unfolding legacy.… (more)

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