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The Queen's Soprano by Carol Dines
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The Queen's Soprano

by Carol Dines

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I read this book out of boredom. My friend had this and I just asked if I can borrow it because I have nothing to do. And then it surprised me. It was good! The setting, the characters.

I can somewhat relate to the protagonist because my parents are a strict and traditional too. But it definitely is not at that level. I just know the feeling of not being able to do something you really want.

So it really had a personal effect on me. I love how she pursued her dreams, and succeed. But it also tells us that nothing happens perfectly. Her success cost her her relationship to her family and love.

It does not only tell a story but it also depicts reality.
  rei_rei_go_away | Mar 13, 2013 |
Reviewed by coollibrarianchick for TeensReadToo.com

It was the cover of the book that first got my attention. The girl on the cover of THE QUEEN'S SOPRANO was wearing a beautiful gown fit for royalty. Little did I know at the time that this book was a fictionalized account of Angelica Voglia, who became Queen Christina's soprano during the time of Pope Innocent XI.

All Angelica wants to do is sing, but the pope has forbidden women to sing in public. Angelica has a voice that was able to bring people to their knees weeping. People come from all over Rome to stand beneath her window to hear her sing. She had many suiters, all arranged by her mother, but the one she was interested in was a poor but talented French artist, Jean Theodon. Jean courts her in secrecy, exchanging messages and drawings with her via the servant girl that works for her family.

Her mother, though, has other ideas. She plans on giving Angelica up to the highest bidder on the hopes that the family's status will be elevated. Angelica's determined to sing and realizes that the only way to do that before an audience and escape a forced marriage arranged by her controlling mother is to flee to Queen Christina's court, where she will become the queen's soprano.

Dines tells Angelica's story beautifully. The characters are all richly developed. I was really able to feel Angelica's determination to accomplish her goals despite the odds stacked against her. Of course there is more to the story, but you will have to read the book to find out what else happens.

I will tell you, though, that the rest of the story is filled with romance, betrayal, death, intrigue, and action. The book will keep your attention until the very end. If you are a historical fiction fan then this is a book that you should place on your list of must-reads. Definitely recommended!! ( )
  GeniusJen | Oct 12, 2009 |
Kearsten says: I liked the view of a woman’s life. Angelica is really at everyone’s else’s mercy, and has a very small window of opportunity to choose a life of her own, but even that is dependent upon other people – Queen Christina, for example. Even Christina, for all that she’s a queen, has her hands tied for the fact that she’s a woman. I also was intrigued by the way that Angelica is blamed for the ‘effect’ her voice has on others. Because a cardinal ‘neglects’ his duties to go listen to her sing, her voice is said to be the devil’s breath. And for the most part, very few people want to celebrate her gift – her mother tries to use it to buy herself a better life, and men want to possess it and Angelica – but not necessarily marry her… ( )
  59Square | Feb 17, 2009 |
I liked the view of a woman’s life. Angelica is really at everyone’s else’s mercy, and has a very small window of opportunity to choose a life of her own, but even that is dependent upon other people – Queen Christina, for example. Even Christina, for all that she’s a queen, has her hands tied for the fact that she’s a woman. I also was intrigued by the way that Angelica is blamed for the ‘effect’ her voice has on others. Because a cardinal ‘neglects’ his duties to go listen to her sing, her voice is said to be the devil’s breath. And for the most part, very few people want to celebrate her gift – her mother tries to use it to buy herself a better life, and men want to possess it and Angelica – but not necessarily marry her… ( )
  kayceel | Feb 11, 2009 |
Christina has been blessed with a beautiful pure soprano. Unfortuntely, the current Pope believes that women should only sing from the sanctity of a convent. Christian runs away to become the Queen's Soprano, but life is not as cheery as it seems from the outside. Love is won and lost.
  freakyjesuschick | Aug 10, 2007 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0152061029, Paperback)

Seventeen-year-old Angelica Voglia loves to sing. But she lives in seventeenth-century Rome, and the pope has forbidden women to sing in public. To make matters worse, her controlling mother is determined to marry her off to a wealthy nobleman, even though Angelica is in love with a poor French artist. Angelica's only hope to sing before an audience--and escape a forced marriage--is to flee to Queen Christina's court, where she will become the queen's soprano. But she soon discovers that the palace walls are not completely secure . . . and her freedom will require an even greater sacrifice than she imagined.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:43:11 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Seventeen year-old Angelica Voglia lives in seventeenth-century Rome and has the voice of an angel, but because the pope forbids women to sing in public, she must escape to Queen Christina's palace to become a court singer.

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