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The phoenix project : a novel about IT,…
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The phoenix project : a novel about IT, DevOps, and helping your business… (edition 2013)

by Gene Kim, Kevin Behr, George Spafford

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6801924,841 (3.97)2
Bill is an IT manager at Parts Unlimited. It's Tuesday morning and on his drive into the office, Bill gets a call from the CEO. The company's new IT initiative, code named Phoenix Project, is critical to the future of Parts Unlimited, but the project is massively over budget and very late. The CEO wants Bill to report directly to him and fix the mess in ninety days or else Bill's entire department will be outsourced. With the help of a prospective board member and his mysterious philosophy of The Three Ways, Bill starts to see that IT work has more in common with manufacturing plant work than he ever imagined. With the clock ticking, Bill must organize work flow streamline interdepartmental communications, and effectively serve the other business functions at Parts Unlimited. In a fast-paced and entertaining style, three luminaries of the DevOps movement deliver a story that anyone who works in IT will recognize. Readers will not only learn how to improve their own IT organizations, they'll never view IT the same way again.… (more)
Member:lambchop_i
Title:The phoenix project : a novel about IT, DevOps, and helping your business win
Authors:Gene Kim
Other authors:Kevin Behr, George Spafford
Info:Portland, Or. : IT Revolution Press, c2013.
Collections:Your library
Rating:
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The Phoenix Project: A Novel about IT, DevOps, and Helping Your Business Win by Gene Kim

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» See also 2 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 19 (next | show all)
Read for work, it was okay. ( )
  bhiggs | Jan 25, 2021 |
Meant as a morality play for managers ends up being a wish fulfilment power fantasy with mary-sue characters. I know it's America but I had no idea half the men in there did military service. Great work on keeping that 20 million strong army a secret. I was expecting Erik to turn out to be the protagonists hallucination or the DevOps fairy. Was disappointed. It's also pretty lame as a regular book. ( )
  TeaTimeCoder | Dec 23, 2020 |
Reading this book a second time, having done this book for a book club at work for the second time.

I enjoyed it more the second time, since I had the opportunity to ponder the teachings moreso than the tale this time.

I think this book is essential reading currently as it pertains to the state of growing software companies to scale. It's a book more for decision makers than individuals, but there are plenty of insights to arm individual contributors with ideas of how to grow success in their own limited spheres as well.

As a novel, it's clear the author is well-written but not a fiction writer by trade. I have some qualms about certain characterizations needed to make characters noble or villainous, and the over-reliance on deference to the military. There are reasons these are involved to keep the book moving, but for a book that's a parable it allows too much reading into these aspects than were intended.

The basic teachings of the book, the idea of "The Four Ways" of work and how one should be thinking about workflow, are things I'm now starting to notice both in my personal life and in my professional life and I'm starting to see rewarding effects to consciously engaging with them. In some ways I wish I had read the companion "DevOps Handbook" first so that I could have gotten straight to the meat of the book, but fiction stories are good ways for people to get into these kinds of topics without it feeling too textbook and dry. ( )
  NaleagDeco | Dec 13, 2020 |
I lost count of the number of times my eyes almost rolled out of my head while reading this. Business-as-parable is a painful genre anyway, and this one is literally ten times longer than it needed to be.

(BTW, did you know Bill was in the Marines? I DO BECAUSE IT WAS MENTIONED EVERY CHAPTER.)

I did enjoy the part where he quit, though. Save yourself a few hours and just read the bit at the end. ( )
  RJ_Stevenson | Aug 19, 2020 |
I’m reading this book to be prepared for a software launch that might happen in the next few months. I read a book like this to ensure that I am on top of my IT game when it comes to responding to life forces. Stories like this tell how powerful information technology can be at transforming organizations when coupled with a simple desire to learn from each other.

Too often, those in IT keeps their ears closed to their fellow co-workers; not surprisingly, those outside of IT do not keep up with software developments either. This book illustrates how to overcome those silos with mere curiosity.

Most organizations – even those outside of traditional tech-sector jobs – can die without effective information management. Through an interesting (and all too typical) narrative, this book illustrates how to make information technology, to buy a metaphor from anatomy, the nervous system of your organizations.

Like all great literature, this story plays upon universal human themes like coming together, listening to each other, and solving huge problems in unconventional ways. It conveys these truths in a way that computer programmers like me can relate to their jobs. I’ve heard and seen most of the bad practices in this book; I’ve also seen many of the suggested solutions in practice in my colleagues. I leave this book ready to encounter the new challenges at my work on Monday morning.

Now, here’s to hoping that I can take the inspiration gathered in this book and apply it to my software launch!

( )
  scottjpearson | Jan 25, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 19 (next | show all)
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Bill is an IT manager at Parts Unlimited. It's Tuesday morning and on his drive into the office, Bill gets a call from the CEO. The company's new IT initiative, code named Phoenix Project, is critical to the future of Parts Unlimited, but the project is massively over budget and very late. The CEO wants Bill to report directly to him and fix the mess in ninety days or else Bill's entire department will be outsourced. With the help of a prospective board member and his mysterious philosophy of The Three Ways, Bill starts to see that IT work has more in common with manufacturing plant work than he ever imagined. With the clock ticking, Bill must organize work flow streamline interdepartmental communications, and effectively serve the other business functions at Parts Unlimited. In a fast-paced and entertaining style, three luminaries of the DevOps movement deliver a story that anyone who works in IT will recognize. Readers will not only learn how to improve their own IT organizations, they'll never view IT the same way again.

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