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Tuf Voyaging by George R. R. Martin
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Tuf Voyaging (1986)

by George R. R. Martin

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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English (24)  Danish (1)  All languages (25)
Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
El estilo de Martin escribiendo es realmente bueno, haciéndonos creíbles mundos incluso extravagantes. Pero es que además desborda imaginación y originalidad, como es el caso de este "Los viajes de Tuf".

Tras terminar de leerlo, no pude sino sentir una honda admiración por semejante obra.

Absolutamente imprescindible si te gusta la ciencia-ficción, y la literatura fantástica en general.
De diez.

Mi reseña completa aquí.
( )
  LuisBermer | Sep 2, 2018 |
“I will sit here in the coolness and talk my thoughts to this crystal and I will drink my wine and watch the flyers, the few who still live, as they dance and soar against the night. Far off, they look so like shadowgulls above my living sea. I will drink my wine and remember how that sea sounded when I was but a Budakhar boy who dreamed of stars, and when the wine is gone I will use the flamer.
(Long silence)
I can think of no more words to say. Janeel knew many words and many names, but I buried her this morning.
(Long silence)
If my voice is ever found . . .
(Short pause)
If this is found after the plague star has waned, as the night-hunters say it will, do not be deceived. This is no fair world, no world for life. Here is death, and plagues beyond numbering. The plague star will shine again.
(Long silence)
My wine is gone.
(End of recording)”

In “Tuf Voyaging” by George R. R. Martin

I sometimes need to learn to relax a bit and don't think of reading as always something that always has to be deep and meaningful. I try to think of genres in the same way one may think of food. One day I might go to the trouble or expense of a chateaubriand, and the next day I really, really fancy cheese on toast. Some days I want to be moved, the next have my head twisted inside out only to follow that with a bit of Jeeves. My advice: (1) don’t get your knickers in a twist about it. The authors all have different intentions and audiences, or maybe that should be audiences in a particular mood and frame of mind that day. For me, SF is my escape from the feeling I really should appreciate, analyse and be critical, and instead just float along happily in a haze of sun, sea and alcohol, or cold medicine, whatever the case may be. Like a secret stash of chocolates to relax with on my own; (2) Don't make reading into a chore. You don't always have to learn something. Sometimes it's just pure fun and recreation. SF allows you to make your own rules and set them in your own invented history. You can place it all in a universe where up is down if you wish and certainly on a world where they have a pink sky and two cooperating suns at one time. The author is truly omnipotent. But the prose doesn't need to be creaky. There are master craftsmen writing in this genre, for instance the-George-R-R-Martin-that-also-wrote-stuff-other-than-the-famigerated-GoT. I'm thinking about this particular little gem called "Tuf Voyaging". Who would have thought Martin had it in him to write stuff like this? As for all this stuff re genres and validity at literature, all genres have dross and have gems. Not seeing that also applies to SF is as dumb as not seeing in this in historical novels or biographies. I accept that for some genre of SF may not be their cup of tea, though maybe this often because they have not been exposed to gems from the genre and have seen some prejudice affirmed from what they have read. Which is a shame, for them. Creaky prose, preposterous characterisation, racist attitudes and all? In fact, if the dilemmas of impoverished middle-class young women in Regency England, or idealistic bootleggers in 1920s New York or ambitious young Irish politicians in late nineteenth century England are not necessarily escapist now, then nor are those of noblemen in an island torn by civil war with the prospect of others crossing the Wall and rumours of dragons overseas. This is as fine a set of science fiction stories as I have ever read, dealing with the problems and relationships of humanity and their technology, bound up with fascinating characters and plots. It also deals in a cautionary way with the problems of unrestrained population growth. Finally, it explores the consequences that result when a single human being gains the ultimate power of life and death. This George-R-R-Martin-that-also-wrote-stuff-other-than-the-famigerated-GoT is as fine a set of SF stories as I have ever read, dealing with the problems and relationships of humanity and their technology, bound up with fascinating characters and plots. It also deals in a cautionary way with the problems of unrestrained population growth. Finally, it explores the consequences that result when a single human being gains the ultimate power of life and death. Go and read “Tuf Voyaging”. It’s that good.

SF = Speculative Fiction.

NB: Peter Tillman brought this book to my attention. I'm glad he did. ( )
1 vote antao | Jul 29, 2018 |
I recently responded to a fellow LT member's review of George R.R. Martin's 'Nightflyers'. I said: It's been a while since I read that, or any of his other short stories, given that he's devoted a lot of time to the sort of fantasy that I generally don't read; but I certainly recollect that his one science fiction novel, 'Dying of the Light', was not well received because of its generally gloomy setting and downbeat resolution. And others of his short stories - 'Sandkings' springs to mind - are equally devoid of happy endings.

The one collection of short stories I would suggest may be worth trying - and I think it's been reprinted recently in a 'Game of Thrones' tie-in edition - is "Tuf Voyaging". It's a series of linked stories about one Havilland Tuf, who comes into possession of an Imperial seed-ship from the Old Empire. He then travels the galaxy, dispensing ecological fixes to a range of different environmentally-challenged planets (for an appropriate fee, of course). It's a lot lighter than a lot of his other work, even though the named character does dispense what you might call "Tuf justice" (sorry about that) to clients whose demands don't appear on Tuf's moral compass. On the other hand, Havilland Tuf does like cats.... ( )
  RobertDay | Jun 2, 2018 |
A collection of short stories about the space adventures of Tuf and his attempts to solve planets' problems. While they are all short stories written at different times, they are very connected and reference each other, with the later stories expanding on the older ones. Tuf is a great character that reminded me a lot of Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole. It is written well and enjoyable throughout the book. Since they are short stories, it is hard to get fully invested though. Great, quick read for easy entertainment. ( )
  renbedell | May 24, 2018 |
An excellent trip into space by an author who is so well-known for his other works that sadly this one can get overlooked. Take some time to delve into the universe with Haviland Tuf, a simple but smart merchant just trying to get by and do right in the cosmos. ( )
  Meghanista | May 23, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
Witty and satirical, Tuf Voyaging is an entertaining sidestep from Martin's more serious work.
 

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
George R. R. Martinprimary authorall editionscalculated
Aulisio, JanetIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chichoni, OscarCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Komarck, MichaelCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Murphy, KevinCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pagel, StephenEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Robert, AlainTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Soler, AlbertoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wilson, DavidCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0671656244, Paperback)

From the multiple award-winning, best-selling author of The Song of Ice and Fire series: Haviland Tuf is an honest space-trader who likes cats. So how is it that, in competition with the worst villains the universe has to offer, he's become the proud owner of the last seedship of Earth's legendary Ecological Engineering Corps? Never mind, just be thankful that the most powerful weapon in human space is in good hands-hands which now control cellular material for thousands of outlandish creatures. With his unique equipment, Tuf is set to tackle the problems human settlers have created in colonizing far-flung worlds: hosts of hostile monsters, a population hooked on procreation, a dictator who unleashes plagues to get his own way... and in every case the only thing that stands between the colonists and disaster is Tuf's ingenuity-and his reputation as an honest dealer in a universe of rogues... Tuf Voyaging interior illustrations by Janet Aulisio. Included will be her original eight illustrations, along with 28 newly commissioned ones.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:17:33 -0400)

"Haviland Tuf is an honest space-trader who likes cats. So how is it that, in competition with the worst villains the universe has to offer, he's become the proud owner of the last seedship of Earth's legendary Ecological Engineering Corps? Never mind, just be thankful that the most powerful weapon in human space is in good hands--hands which now control cellular material for thousands of outlandish creatures. Armed with this unique equipment, Tuf is set to tackle the problems that human settlers have created in colonizing far-flung worlds: hosts of hostile monsters, a population hooked on procreation, a dictator who unleashes plagues to get his own way...and in every case, the only thing that stands between the colonists and disaster is Tuf's ingenuity--and his reputation as a man of integrity in a universe of rogues."--from cover, p. [4]… (more)

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