HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Proxima by Stephen Baxter
Loading...

Proxima (original 2013; edition 2015)

by Stephen Baxter (Author)

Series: Proxima (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2961154,199 (3.49)7
Member:GVassmer
Title:Proxima
Authors:Stephen Baxter (Author)
Info:Ace (2015), Edition: Reissue, 512 pages
Collections:Your library, To read
Rating:
Tags:SFF

Work details

Proxima by Stephen Baxter (2013)

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 7 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
This novel has both an interesting premise as well as some decent world building in it but as an overall novel this one just did not work that well for me. It had at least three different story lines going on that did not seem to have any connection and while they converged some by the end of this story, I felt kind of let down by the ending which did not answer a multitude of questions raised. I am guessing you are going to have to read the followup novel to get thee answered but not sure if I am going to make the effort.

3 stars for a decent premise that could have been a lot better. ( )
  ConalO | Apr 23, 2018 |
For me, Baxter is an equivalent for efficient page turning - not too hard on the science front, many plots going on at once, many plot turns that come more or less unexpected, believable characters (though, in this case, the colonised planet was one of the most remarkable "characters" in itself). Simply a good story and perfect when on holidays and one is forced to spend 7 of 10 days with the flu in a hotel bed. ( )
  DeusXMachina | Aug 11, 2017 |
Proxima is a story about interstellar colonization by an Earth that has been torn apart by climate change, and political turmoil. Initially the book gave me that funny feeling like I had stepped into part2 of a trilogy. Baxter mentions important events in the story casually like the reader should already be familiar with them. He open several plot lines and fails to give the reader much back story. After the first 100 pages the story got into a rhythm and pacing I could enjoy. Yet a lot of the themes such as artificial intelligences, political intrigue between various coalitions seem to have been already explored in other science fiction stories I have read. The story's uniqueness begins once the actual colonization of Proxima begins. Baxter has his colonists marooned on different parts of planet in genetically diverse groups with some tools and the orders to make babies until the next ship from Earth shows up. He seeds both Earth and Proxima with alien artifacts that enable instant travel between the 2 systems, and power the starships. He uses these 2 plot devices to explore what happens between the factions on Earth and groups of stranded people on Proxima. I won't give away the ending which acts as both a cliff hanger for the next book Ultima and a sort of reasonable conclusion for the Proxima storyline. I plan to read the next book once it becomes available at my library. The story is ok but not worth buying for your book collection.
( )
  Cataloger623 | Nov 23, 2016 |
Origninally reviewed on almightylewry.wordpress.com

This is Stephen Baxter at his best. this is a novel about colonisation of our closest star. the Sci-Fi in this book as is is with the majority of Stephens titles is based loosely on Science and theoretical physics of today and is always a plausible future. It covers a range of humanitarian issues, like children being held accountable for the crimes of their parents.

The story follows Yuri, a child who was frozen by his parents who were part of the “heroic generation”, him adjusting to new environments and worlds. The UN have a prominent role in the future society and their “peacekeepers” are supposed to be used as their title suggests but, as with every organisation, there are some within the ranks that dislike those they are sent to protect and take it out on them….brutally.

The human condition shines through, whether it is a disgruntled nation throwing it’s toys out of the pram or the disdain humanity shows to the natives. This novel shows what we can achieve and how quickly we can lose it through our own greed.

The plan to colonise Proxima C was well thought out, placing genetically diverse groups in strategic locations around the planet, giving humanity the best possible chance of succeeding in the harsh new environment, however not all goes to plan, as humans are curious creatures and like to explore.

I really enjoyed this book, if I were to write a Sci-Fi novel, this is how I would like to write it. It was hard going and you have to pay attention to all the little details, with Stephens writing, all the little details are as significant as each other and help build a well realised future, with a level of concentration on the finer details, I personally haven’t found anywhere else. ( )
  grlewry | Sep 22, 2016 |
I have read an enormous amount of science fiction over the years. It has become increasingly rare to stumble upon originality in the genre, because let’s face it, there are only so many alien constructs that can be convincingly presented. Only so many “hard” science fiction methods of faster than light travel that can be posited. That is not to say that good science fiction cannot be written within somewhat hackneyed constructs, only that doing so must rely on something other than the science fiction. Character development becomes increasingly important.

I found Proxima to be an enjoyable and thought provoking work. It had an abundance of hard science fiction, coupled with sometimes intriguing characters and enough originality to score points in that regard. Through the discovery of “kernels” on the planet Mercury, near light speed travel becomes possible. The solar system is divided between two superpowers, the Chinese Confederation and the United Nations. Discovery of the kernels and then a second artifact, tip the balance of power in favor of the UN, setting the stage for interstellar conflict. Colonization of the nearest habitable planet, Per Adua, ups the ante.

This is the first of two books in a series, the second being Ultima. I was very pleased with Proxima, right up until the very last few pages, at which point I knew that I would have a major plausibility problem with the second book in the series; and I was right. ( )
  santhony | Aug 15, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Stephen Baxterprimary authorall editionscalculated
Youll, PaulCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Original title
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0575116846, Paperback)

The very far future: The Galaxy is a drifting wreck of black holes, neutron stars, chill white dwarfs. The age of star formation is long past. Yet there is life here, feeding off the energies of the stellar remnants, and there is mind, a tremendous Galaxy-spanning intelligence each of whose thoughts lasts a hundred thousand years. And this mind cradles memories of a long-gone age when a more compact universe was full of light ...The 27th century: Proxima Centauri, an undistinguished red dwarf star, is the nearest star to our sun - and (in this fiction), the nearest to host a world, Proxima IV, habitable by humans. But Proxima IV is unlike Earth in many ways. Huddling close to the warmth, orbiting in weeks, it keeps one face to its parent star at all times. The 'substellar point', with the star forever overhead, is a blasted desert, and the 'antistellar point' on the far side is under an ice cap in perpetual darkness. How would it be to live on such a world? Needle ships fall from Proxima IV's sky. Yuri Jones, with 1000 others, is about to find out ...Proxima tells the amazing tale of how we colonise a harsh new eden, and the secret we find there that will change our role in the Universe for ever.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:24:31 -0400)

The very far future: The Galaxy is a drifting wreck of black holes, neutron stars, chill white dwarfs. The age of star formation is long past. Yet there is life here, feeding off the energies of the stellar remnants, and there is a mind, a tremendous Galaxy-spanning intelligence each of whose thoughts lasts a hundred thousand years. And this mind cradles memories of a long-gone age when a more compact universe was full of light. The 27th century: Proxima Centauri, an undistinguished red dwarf star, is the nearest star to our sun - and the nearest to host a world, Proxima IV, habitable by humans. But Proxima IV is unlike Earth in many ways. Huddling close to the warmth, orbiting in weeks, it keeps one face to its parent star at all times. The 'substellar point', with the star forever overhead, is a blasted desert, and the 'antistellar point' on the far side is under an ice cap in perpetual darkness. How would it be to live on such a world? Needle ships fall from Proxima IV's sky. Yuri Jones, with 1000 others, is about to find out. Proxima tells the amazing tale of how we colonise a harsh new Eden, and the secret we find there that will change our role in the Universe for ever.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 4 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.49)
0.5
1 2
1.5 2
2 3
2.5 1
3 20
3.5 10
4 24
4.5 1
5 7

Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 128,815,151 books! | Top bar: Always visible