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The King of Infinite Space: Euclid and His…
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The King of Infinite Space: Euclid and His Elements (2013)

by David Berlinski

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I liked this book but I need to relearn mathematics (particularly the geometry) to really appreciate this book. Also, the print or ebook format would be more suitable to digest the information. That being said, I am now motivated to reinvigorate my math skills and reread this book! ( )
  jimocracy | Apr 18, 2015 |
I listened to this book as a CD while driving to/from work. This did not work well as some of the book refers to diagrams and equations. In spite of that it was an interesting discussion, which bordered on philosophy at times. The author also has an entertaining sense of humor. ( )
  GlennBell | Feb 3, 2015 |
A mathman's ode to Euclid of Alexandria's geometry, first presented as an axiomatic system 23 centuries ago in the masterwork called the _Elements_. High-level, enjoyable, and fairly short. Such topics as Hilbert's refurbishment and alternative geometries are covered too. "[Euclid's style] is vital, an ideal, a moral advantage, a corrective to whatever is spongy, soft, indistinct, slovenly, half-hidden, half-formed, half-baked, or only half-right, the mind in full possession of its powers, straight as an arrow, hard as a stone, uncompromising as a bank." (p148-9)
  fpagan | May 14, 2013 |
Showing 3 of 3
Reading this brief, lively work is like sitting with the author in a French café with too many carafes of red wine and the smoke of hundreds of Gauloises swirling inside your head. "Mathematicians are fussy as cats. And almost as conservative," your host says. "Counting would seem to come first, no? . . . Long live the numbers then. But then there is seeing. Shapes are metaphysically as compelling as numbers. . . . Long live the shapes too."
 
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Euclid is universally acclaimed great. (Preface)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 046501481X, Hardcover)

Geometry defines the world around us, helping us make sense of everything from architecture to military science to fashion. And for over two thousand years, geometry has been equated with Euclid’s Elements, arguably the most influential book in the history of mathematics In The King of Infinite Space, renowned mathematics writer David Berlinski provides a concise homage to this elusive mathematician and his staggering achievements. Berlinski shows that, for centuries, scientists and thinkers from Copernicus to Newton to Einstein have relied on Euclid’s axiomatic system, a method of proof still taught in classrooms around the world. Euclid’s use of elemental logic—and the mathematical statements he and others built from it—have dramatically expanded the frontiers of human knowledge.

The King of Infinite Space presents a rich, accessible treatment of Euclid and his beautifully simple geometric system, which continues to shape the way we see the world.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:06:28 -0400)

Geometry defines the world around us, helping us make sense of everything from architecture to military science to fashion. Euclid's Elements is arguably the most influential book in the history of mathematics. Berlinski provides a concise homage to this elusive mathematician and his staggering achievements, and shows that, for centuries, scientists and thinkers have relied on Euclid's axiomatic system, a method of proof still taught in classrooms around the world.… (more)

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