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The Cherry Cola Book Club by Ashton Lee
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The Cherry Cola Book Club (edition 2013)

by Ashton Lee

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9613125,712 (3.07)8
Member:RobinBrz
Title:The Cherry Cola Book Club
Authors:Ashton Lee
Info:Kensington Books (2013), Kindle Edition, 273 pages
Collections:Your library, Recently Read
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The Cherry Cola Book Club (A Cherry Cola Book Club Novel) by Ashton Lee

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  activelearning | Feb 10, 2016 |
The Cherry Cola Book Club by Ashton Lee was Page Turners’ selection for February. Sad to say only one of our members liked it. The book had the feel of a cozy mystery — really quirky characters and a small town setting — but alas, no mystery was to be had. The author instead endeavored to create women’s fiction involving a book club dedicated to saving the local library. Great premise; poor execution. The characters came off as caricatures and the plot strained believability. And nothing seemed to happen. One bright spot was the inclusion of food — lots of it. The characters ate more than they discussed books! It is the first in a series, but sadly, we will not be reading subsequent books. ( )
  vintagebeckie | Feb 20, 2015 |
Maura Beth Mayhew has been the librarian at Cherico, Mississippi for about 6 years. The head town councilman is threatening to shut down the library. Maura Beth, her friends, and patrons launch a campaign to keep the library in the town's budget. I listened to the audiobook of this and found it to be perfect for a drive where I couldn't pay close attention all the time, but there were things that bothered me, both about the book and the reader. The reader consistently mispronounced "Natchez." Cherico is described as being in Mississippi on the Tennessee River where there are lots of retirees and folks who have summer homes with a population of about 5000. It is also described as being near Corinth and that folks go "over to" Corinth. The only true town that comes close to this description would be Iuka. The description of the library itself does not seem to fit any library in that general area with which I'm familiar. Mississippians in that part of the state tend to have mayors and boards of aldermen rather than councilmen. There is an incident where a person has a heart attack and is flown from the Cherico hospital to Nashville for an angioplasty. No one in Tishomingo County would be flown to Nashville when that same sort of surgery can be performed at the largest hospital in the state of Mississippi in Tupelo which is much closer and convenient for the families. The author made it sound like balloon angioplasty was quite new in 2012, but it has been performed for awhile, and I can assure you that the surgeons working the North Mississippi Medical Center in Tupelo are quite experienced in the procedure as my own father had it done there several years prior to 2012. The premise of the book was interesting. The discussion topics for Gone with the Wind, To Kill a Mockingbird, and The Robber Bridegroom are interesting, but the author needed to set her book in an area with which she was more familiar, perhaps either the very mispronounced "Natchez" or "Nashville" which she kept trying to figure into the narrative. It was a little strange having the recipes read to you at the end of an audio book. That feature probably works better with the print version. I'm curious enough about the book club and its topics, and the viability of the library to perhaps try the second installment. ( )
  thornton37814 | Jun 6, 2014 |
I didn't like this one much. The characters were far too earnest, while at the same time, two-dimensional. The premise of a librarian coasting for six years, then rallying the entire town to save the library...by creating a book club, no less...was not believable. Very light book. ( )
  LynnB | Apr 12, 2014 |
This book is filled with Southern charm and warmth, and scenes of people getting together over good food to talk books and get folks using the library warm the cockles of my heart, but I have to admit that I could never completely believe the premise of this book-- and it's got everything to do with my childhood. I grew up in a small village in central Illinois. My mother took over as librarian of a neglected, seldom-used building of out-dated books and a floor that was held up by huge jacks in the basement. With a tiny budget, it was my mother's job to increase circulation and make that library something of which to be proud. She did. By the time she left, our village library had over twice the circulation of the library in the much larger county seat.

Why does this prevent me from falling hook, line, and sinker for this book? Because Maura Beth has been the librarian in Cherico for six years, and during that time it seems that all she's done is ask for a parking lot and computers. One of her assistants states that there are plenty of days that no one at all comes in the library-- and Maura Beth is shocked when the City Council starts thinking of closing the place down? It's only when she has that "gun" of closing held to her head that she finally rolls up her sleeves and starts doing her job.

Don't get me wrong: there's a lot to like in this book, and there are good tips for anyone who's wanting to increase their library traffic. But my own memories of all the work my mother put into the library in our village prevents me from giving this book a whole-hearted recommendation. Loving books and libraries as I do, this makes me feel a tad guilty. ( )
  cathyskye | Oct 5, 2013 |
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For Weesie and Bob, beloved parents
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Maura Beth Mayhew shut her sky blue eyes and let the unsettling words that had just been thrown her way sink in for a few tense moments.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 075827341X, Paperback)

[MP3CD audiobook format in vinyl case.]

Set in a small town in Mississippi, The Cherry Cola Book Club is the touching and sometimes hilarious story of a young, upbeat librarian who has been given an ultimatum to increase the library's circulation dramatically -- or risk having to close its doors.

Maura doesn't just start a book club; she gets involved in unique and unexpected ways with her library patrons. She entertains and advises them, she has potluck dinners, and life in the town begins to imitate art. The patrons begin to relate their own lives to the work of writers like Margaret Mitchell and Harper Lee. In moving and personal ways, Maura helps them deal with such subjects as long-lost love and a brush with death, offering advice on nearly everything -- including romance. No topic is off limits. Along the way, Maura raises the profile of the library -- but will it be enough?

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:07:21 -0400)

"Set in a small town in Mississippi, The Cherry Cola Book Club is the touching and sometimes hilarious story of a young, upbeat librarian who has been given an ultimatum to increase the library's circulation dramatically--or risk having to close its doors. Maura doesn't just start a book club; she gets involved in unique and unexpected ways with her library patrons. She entertains and advises them, she has potluck dinners, and life in the town begins to imitate art. The patrons begin to relate their own lives to the work of writers like Margaret Mitchell and Harper Lee. In moving and personal ways, Maura helps them deal with such subjects as long-lost love and a brush with death, offering advice on nearly everything--including romance. No topic is off limits. Along the way, Maura raises the profile of the library--but will it be enough?"-- From publisher's description.… (more)

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