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The Mighty Lalouche by Matthew Olshan
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The Mighty Lalouche

by Matthew Olshan

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Lalouche is a postman who lives in Paris with his finch, Genevieve. When he loses his job as a postman, he starts boxing to make a living. Despite taunts from other boxers and Diamond Jacques, his coach, Lalouche proceeds to amaze everyone in the ring. He remains undefeated. However, Lalouche, a postman at heart, agrees to resume his old job after his boss asks him back.
  teacher1267 | Jan 28, 2014 |
This is a lovely little tale accompanied by delightful illustrations that truly capture the spirit of the time and place. In my opinion, however, there was a something missing from the story - perhaps a more distinct or clear message? ( )
  mariekagreene | Jan 26, 2014 |
A triumph-of-the-small story elevated by the French setting, quirky postal details, and inventive similes (My favorite: "Tall as a spiral staircase, as wide as a wall of cubbies, as massive as a heap of undelivered packages"). Since it reads like a picture book biography, I really appreciated the author's note at the back. ( )
  MelissaZD | Dec 31, 2013 |
A triumph-of-the-small story elevated by the French setting, quirky postal details, and inventive similes (My favorite: "Tall as a spiral staircase, as wide as a wall of cubbies, as massive as a heap of undelivered packages"). Since it reads like a picture book biography, I really appreciated the author's note at the back. ( )
  MelissaZD | Dec 31, 2013 |
I really enjoyed, “The Mighty LaLouche” for many reasons. First, the illustrations within the book were absolutely stunning and made me feel like I had been transported to France. Secondly, I really enjoyed how the book included a dictionary of a few French phrases used in the story, so I could follow along and know what the characters were saying. Lastly, I love how the character of LaLouche, a very talented boxer, gave up his fame and fortune to go back to his humble career of a postman. In the beginning of the book LaLouche is let go from his job as a foot postman (a career he loves) and replaced by an electric autocar, who can get the job done faster. Out of necessity, LaLouche decides to become a boxer who is doubted by his manager and other competitors at first because of his slight size. However, after proving everyone wrong and becoming an undefeated boxer, LaLouche returns back to his old job of a foot postman when the cars stop working. I think it’s great that the author included this about LaLouche because it emphasizes how fame and fortune can’t buy someone happiness. This brings me to the, “central idea” of the book. I believe that there are two big ideas in, “The Mighty LaLouche.” First, I think one idea is that when you have something to win for, you fight for things harder. This is exemplified when LaLouche has to take on the Anaconda, a very enormous and scary rival. The Anaconda is faster, stronger, and nimbler than LaLouche. However, the Anaconda is a very pompous person and thinking that he beat LaLouche, starts to impress the crowd by flexing his muscles. However, LaLouche, who loves his pet bird, the mail, and his county, is empowered by these things and ends up beating the Anaconda, who just wanted to win so he could act even more conceited. This important message of always having someone or something to fight for is a very important message to keep people motivated and determined. The second big idea within, “The Mighty LaLouche” is the importance of always being humble. Even though LaLouche became an undefeated boxer he always remained humble which allowed him to be happy with the little things in life, like being a postman and having an apartment with a scenic view. People like the Anaconda, who want to be as flashy and pompous as they can be, tend to oversee the tiny, important things in life, thus missing the beauty of it. ( )
  MaryBethLingner | Sep 30, 2013 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0375862250, Hardcover)

"A bona fide knockout. C'est formidable!" declares Publishers Weekly in a starred review.

In Paris, France, there lived a humble postman named Lalouche. He was small, but his hands were nimble, his legs were fast, and his arms were strong. When his job was replaced by an electric car, he turned to boxing to support himself and his pet finch, Genevieve. But—"You? A boxer?" the fighters asked. "I could sneeze and knock you down!" Still, Lalouche refused to give up. And perhaps small Lalouche was just nimble . . . just fast . . . and just strong enough to beat his fierce competitors. This is a marvelous story, full of humor and heart, and illustrated by Sophie Blackall, winner of a New York Times Best Illustrated Award.

Includes an author's note with historical information about French boxing and electric cars.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:23:57 -0400)

In Paris, France, more than a hundred years ago, a small man named Lalouche is let go from his job as a mail carrier and discovers that he has great skill as a fighter.

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