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If You Meet the Buddha on the Road, Kill…
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If You Meet the Buddha on the Road, Kill Him! The Pilgrimage of… (1972)

by Sheldon Kopp

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If I Meet [a:Sheldon B. Kopp|1326397|Sheldon B. Kopp|http://www.goodreads.com/images/nophoto/nophoto-U-50x66.jpg] on the Road, I will Kill Him! That's what I thought when I was halfway through the [b:If You Meet the Buddha on the Road Kill Him|119390|If You Meet the Buddha on the Road, Kill Him! The Pilgrimage of Psychotherapy Patients|Sheldon B. Kopp|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1316542361s/119390.jpg|1660264]. Towards the end though it completely changed my perspective. Don't be biased like I was after seeing the "The Pilgrimage of Psychotherapy Patients" in the title and the continuous mention of "in therapy" throughout the book.

"The most important things that each man must learn no one can teach him. Once he accepts this disappointment, he will be able to stop depending on the therapist, the guru who turns out to be just another struggling human being." This is what is written at the back of the book and is emphasized throughout as well. But the message doesn't ends here and you end up knowing or rather remembering, like a forgotten dream, much more than you thought.

The book is divided into four parts which I will not mention. The journey was rewarding and I just loved Part III and Part IV. Writings and tales have been included to give a fresh perspective to the book but there lies its folly as it has become rather a confused mixture and that's why Part II tends to be the weakest. But the author draws from his personal experiences as well and this is what makes this book so realistically honest.

In all a must read, for towards the end you will find though you have learnt nothing new you were not aware of already. The only point being here "you were not aware of it".
( )
  Nikunj.Agrawal | Apr 15, 2013 |
From the standpoint of a psychotherapeutic view of reality Koop interacts with a lot of varying thought streams - Jewish, Christian, New Age, Eastern - though always from the position of a collage of thought rather than defending the thesis which is the title of his book. I like the fact that he interacted with "Carlos Castaneda" and found some value there. And I read wise thoughts in this book that well up from his variety of sources. ( )
  823icc | Apr 14, 2013 |
parts of this book were good and parts were tough to push through. i like much of his message but not all, and the delivery of parts of it were lacking. definitely just ok for me. ( )
  elisa.saphier | Apr 2, 2013 |
Self-help books are generally terrible. This is not, therefore, a true self-help book, because it isn't terrible. It does, though, help - if you get the idea. Kopp is a psychoanalyst (and a lot else besides) and his book is a combination memoir and guide to troubled souls. It was well-written and accessible, and not at all airy or empty like so many others in the genre. ( )
  soylentgreen23 | May 27, 2009 |
No meaning that comes from outside of ourselves is real. The Buddhahood of each of us has already been obtained. We need only recognize it. Thus the Zen Master warns his disciple: If you meet the Buddha on the road, Kill him!
"The most important things that each man must learn no one else can teach him. Once he accepts this disappointment, he will be able to stop depending on the therapist, the guru who turns out to be just another struggling human being".
Using the myths of Gilgamesh, Siddhartha, The Wife of Bath, Don Quixote... the works of Buber, Ginsberg, Shakespeare, Kafka, Nin, Dante and Jung ... a brilliant psychotherapist, guru and pilgrim shares the epic tales and intimate revelations that help to shape Everyman's journey through life.
1 vote rajendran | Jan 15, 2008 |
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For me dead parents,whom I often miss:
  My Mother whose strength and ferocity nurtured me, almost did me in, and taught me how to survive.
  And my Father whose gentleness and passivity showed me how to love, let me down often, and freed me to find my own way.
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