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Anger: Wisdom for Cooling the Flames by…
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Anger: Wisdom for Cooling the Flames (original 2001; edition 2001)

by Thich Nhat Hanh

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9861613,085 (4.03)9
Member:Madison2011
Title:Anger: Wisdom for Cooling the Flames
Authors:Thich Nhat Hanh
Info:1st ed. New York: Riverhead, 2001. / Hardcover, 242 pp.
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:Spiritual life, Buddhism, Anger, Compassion, non-fiction

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Anger by Thích Nhất Hạnh (2001)

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English (12)  French (2)  Italian (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (16)
Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
This book I was surprised to see appears to have been endorsed by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. himself. I'd not realized that this author or practioner was around that long. Much of what is in the book goes back to the mindfullness or insight meditation that I studied after university, which I did not find helpful with my panic reactions to trauma, nor with trauma itself, but in adding his chapter about caring for and inviting the inner wounded child along when you go to see a beautiful mountain, for example, now I see that there are other ways to use mindfulness and meditation that can be helpful in dealing with trauma.
I particularly like the idea of spouses treating each other with the respect normally reserved for a guest in one's house, which he says is Vietnamese tradition. Very nice. ( )
  FourFreedoms | May 17, 2019 |
It was under the bodhi tree in India twenty-five centuries ago that Buddha achieved the insight that three states of mind were the source of all our unhappiness: wrong knowing, obsessive desire, and anger. All are difficult, but in one instant of anger—one of the most powerful emotions—lives can be ruined, and health and spiritual development can be destroyed. With exquisite simplicity, Buddhist monk and Vietnam refugee Thich Nhat Hanh gives tools and advice for transforming relationships, focusing energy, and rejuvenating those parts of ourselves that have been laid waste by anger. His extraordinary wisdom can transform your life and the lives of the people you love, and in the words of Thich Nhat Hanh, can give each reader the power to "change everything."
  PSZC | Mar 12, 2019 |
This book I was surprised to see appears to have been endorsed by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. himself. I'd not realized that this author or practioner was around that long. Much of what is in the book goes back to the mindfullness or insight meditation that I studied after university, which I did not find helpful with my panic reactions to trauma, nor with trauma itself, but in adding his chapter about caring for and inviting the inner wounded child along when you go to see a beautiful mountain, for example, now I see that there are other ways to use mindfulness and meditation that can be helpful in dealing with trauma.
I particularly like the idea of spouses treating each other with the respect normally reserved for a guest in one's house, which he says is Vietnamese tradition. Very nice. ( )
  ShiraDest | Mar 6, 2019 |
Buddhism > Buddhism - ethics > Other Religions > Religion > Religions of Indic origin
  FHQuakers | Feb 12, 2018 |
I like this book. It is a good book. He does touch on some extremely practical aspects of how to deal with anger, and while the exhortations to be mindful may seem repetitious, they are relevant. I can testify to this, as I was in a particularly nasty situation recently, and was not mindful. I came off the loser, and it took me a few days of deep breathing to recover my calm.

He does also, in the book, give some extremely practical situations, and some extremely practical tools. there is much value in this.

There seems to be some repetition in the book, and this is why I give it 4, not 5. ( )
  RajivC | Oct 24, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
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To be happy, to me, is to suffer less.
Quotations
If your house is on fire, the most urgent thing to do is to go back and try to put out the fire, not to run after the person you believe to be the arsonist. If you run after the person you suspect has burned your house, your house will burn down while you are chasing him or her. That is not wise. You must go back and put out the fire. So when you are angry, if you continue to interact with or argue with the other person, if you try to punish her, you are acting exactly like someone who runs after the arsonist while everything goes up in flames.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0712611819, Paperback)

Anger can be one of the most frustrating emotions, carrying us headlong away from ourselves and depositing us into separation and dismay. Vietnamese monk and world teacher Thich Nhat Hanh tackles this most difficult of emotions in Anger. A master at putting complex ideas into simple, colorful packages, Nhat Hanh tells us that, fundamentally, to be angry is to suffer, and that it is our responsibility to alleviate our own suffering. The way to do this is not to fight our emotions or to "let it all out" but to transform ourselves through mindfulness. Emphasizing our basic interdependence, he teaches us how to help others through deep listening and how to water the positive seeds in those around us while starving the negative seeds. Serious though lighthearted, Anger is a handbook not only for transforming anger but for living each moment beautifully. --Brian Bruya

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:22:02 -0400)

Draws on the principles of Buddhism to discuss the potentially devastating impact of anger on human health and offers a variety of stories, techniques, and tools designed to help transform anger into peace and bring harmony and healing into one's life.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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