HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Kissing Hand by Audrey Penn
Loading...

The Kissing Hand (original 1993; edition 2007)

by Audrey Penn, Ruth E. Harper (Illustrator), Nancy M. Leak (Illustrator)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3,7731651,381 (4.27)6
Member:callie.peat
Title:The Kissing Hand
Authors:Audrey Penn
Other authors:Ruth E. Harper (Illustrator), Nancy M. Leak (Illustrator)
Info:Tanglewood Press (2007), Edition: Book & CD, Paperback, 24 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:BL 2.7

Work details

The Kissing Hand by Audrey Penn (1993)

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 6 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 164 (next | show all)
This is one of those odd children's books where it's hard for me to pintpoint what age it's meant for without the book stating it. The story is so simple and short that I feel it's aimed toward the very young, but the writing style leaps forward by a few years.

Its super-simple tale will create a brief, but touching, note for children. The illustrations are also kept basic with plenty of blues, grays, and not great detail. Plenty of sketched in pencils and generic face expressions. I did like that the twist that the school was at night for the raccoon kids, and that it ended up being held high in the tree. I think talking about the magic of the kissing hand, accompanied with the wise owl leading it in the end, the moon, and the tree all emphasized the surreal feel. ( )
  ErinPaperbackstash | Jun 14, 2016 |
I liked this book for many reasons. First, the illustrations are beautifully done, and I enjoyed looking at them throughout reading the text. They really enhanced the story and made you feel like you were part of the story as well. The language is clear and simple enough for young readers to understand. The writing is organized well, and the book is well paced from beginning to end. The characters are relatable to children, although they are animals, because the story deals with the nervousness that children have when they are being separated from their families. Sometimes children tend to be scared when they are leaving their parents for a little while but this book pushes readers to believe that their "kissing hand" is always with them. Just like how Chester had his kissing hand on the first day of school, he was no longer afraid because he had his mother's love with him.The big idea of this story is to never be afraid when you leave your family because their love is always with you to comfort you and you will be back with them soon. I would recommend this book for young children ages 5-7 as they may experience the same feelings Chester was feeling. ( )
  Hayfastutman | Jun 9, 2016 |
***This book was reviewed for Netgalley***

The Kissing Hand, by Audrey Penn, is a beautifully illustrated children's book telling the tale of Chester Racoon on his first day of school. Young Chester is scared, and doesn't want to go. (Who would?) His mother shares with him the secret of the Kissing Hand. She takes his tiny paw and places a kiss in the center of it, telling him to press his hand to his cheek if he’s scared or sad, and it will remind him that she loves him. At the very end, just before Chester goes to school, he leaves his ma with her own Kissing Hand. Soo sweet!

I like the attention to detail regarding when racoons wake and sleep! Brava! This story offers a great way for any parent to offer reassurances to a child in need. Teaches lesson that You are Loved. Also that what may seem strange and scary at first can quickly become familiar. We just need to give it a chance.

My cubs, if all ages, love this book. I bought a copy many moons ago, when the eldest were just wee ones. I have plans to buy a copy for my nephew. I hope he loves it as much as they do.

Reading this book again, alone, made me cry. It brought back memories of my grandmother, gone a decade now. My grandparents raised me during my most formative years, and my grandmother is the person I always sought comfort from.

🎻🎻🎻🎻🎻 Highly recommended for children of all ages. ( )
  PardaMustang | Jun 6, 2016 |
I liked this book for many reasons. First, the illustrations are beautifully done, and I enjoyed looking at them throughout reading the text. They really enhanced the story and made you feel like you were part of the story as well. The language is clear and simple enough for young readers to understand. The writing is organized well, and the book is well paced from beginning to end. The characters are relatable to children, although they are animals, because the story deals with the nervousness that children have when they are being separated from their families. Sometimes children tend to be scared when they are leaving their parents for a little while but this book pushes readers to believe that their "kissing hand" is always with them. Just like how Chester had his kissing hand on the first day of school, he was no longer afraid because he had his mother's love with him.The big idea of this story is to never be afraid when you leave your family because their love is always with you to comfort you and you will be back with them soon. I would recommend this book for young children ages 5-7 as they may experience the same feelings Chester was feeling. ( )
  Jcomfo1 | May 9, 2016 |
Audrey Penn writes about a young raccoon named Chester who is scared to start school. His mother reassures him that he will be okay and teaches him the secret of the kissing hand. She opens up his hand, kisses his palm, and tells him to put his hand on his cheek whenever he starts to miss her. This makes Chester feel much better, and when he leaves for school he does the same thing to his mother. Ruth Harper and Nancy Leak did a great job with the illustrations throughout the book. It looks like they were created with watercolors. What I love most is the image on the very last page. It is a picture of a raccoon’s hand with a heart on the palm, and the sign language sign of “I love you.” I think this book would be great to read to a kindergarten class on the first day of school. ( )
  cedoyle | Apr 25, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 164 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (5 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Audrey Pennprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Harper, Ruth E.Illustratormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Leak, Nancy M.Illustratormain authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To: Stefanie Rebecca Korn and children everywhere who love to be loved.
First words
Chester Raccoon stood at the edge of the forest and cried.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0590047019, Paperback)

Book

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:14:05 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

When Chester the raccoon is reluctant to go to kindergarten for the first time, his mother teaches him a secret way to carry her love with him.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
7 avail.
50 wanted
5 pay4 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.27)
0.5
1 3
1.5
2 10
2.5 2
3 43
3.5 9
4 120
4.5 13
5 174

Audible.com

An edition of this book was published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Store | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 106,860,705 books! | Top bar: Always visible