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Ruby Holler by Sharon Creech
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Ruby Holler (2002)

by Sharon Creech

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My daughter said this is one of her favorite books and Sharon Creech is one of her favorite authors. I had already read “Walk Two Moons” but that didn’t set me up proper for this one. Walk Two Moons has big questions, like karma, parental loss, parental absence, and lots of death. Ruby Holler is about a brother and sister, two grandparents in a cabin, and evil villains who run an orphanage.

It reminded me of a female Roald Dahl book + Gilmore Girls/Switched at Birth. There’s all this quaint country stuff (living in the woods, rural lifestyle, hiking and boating) with a little spitz of magic. There are some problems with choppiness and loose ends (the evil orphanage owner gets a rather pithy comeuppance for his misdeeds). It’s like "Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events" if it was shown on CMT. ( )
  theWallflower | Jan 30, 2019 |
I read “Ruby Holler” by Sharon Creech. This book was a contemporary realistic fiction chapter book. I would give this book 5 stars. The main idea of this book is family. The author uses point-of-view, characters, and plot to enforce family being the main idea.
Point-of-View: The point-of-view changes throughout the book between the two twins, Dallas and Florida, who were both put up for adoption. They each talk about their struggles and ideas and while they are twins, have two very different personalities. The twins struggle to find a family, and talk about their experiences with each one.
Characters: In this book, the twins get adopted and have a really bad experience with all the characters that adopt them. It makes the reader get an idea of what it would be like to live in an orphanage and not have a family that cares about you.
Plot: The plot of the story is that there are two kids in an orphanage who have a really bad experience with getting adopted. One husband and wife adopt them and they work as hard as they can to escape and try to find their regular family. In the end, they end up loving their adoptive parents and live together as a family. ( )
  NajetAniba | Oct 3, 2016 |
Dallas and Florida are twins that were abandoned and who have lived in an orphanage. Getting to know the characters and hoping they will find a family to love them is what I hoped for throughout the book. It is a heartwarming story.

Curriculum connection: Writing - Have students write a personal reaction writing as if they were one of the characters and what they would do.
  sanm277 | Mar 29, 2016 |
Oh joy! A story about maltreated orphans who just want someone to love them. You almost never see one of those!

Why this book has won the regard of writers such as Pullman mystifies me. The story is hackneyed. The bad guys are such blueprint made to order cretins and the good guys full of such homespun folksy goodness as to be cringe worthy. One of the motifs of the book are the recipes that the fatherly Tiller concoct, getting-over-being-an-orphan stew, welcome-home bacon. What I could have used is a platter of why-the-hell-am-I-reading- this corn pone. ( )
  lucybrown | Sep 27, 2015 |
Oh joy! A story about maltreated orphans who just want someone to love them. You almost never see one of those!

Why this book has won the regard of writers such as Pullman mystifies me. The story is hackneyed. The bad guys are such blueprint made to order cretins and the good guys full of such homespun folksy goodness as to be cringe worthy. One of the motifs of the book are the recipes that the fatherly Tiller concoct, getting-over-being-an-orphan stew, welcome-home bacon. What I could have used is a platter of why-the-hell-am-I-reading- this corn pone. ( )
  lucybrown | Sep 27, 2015 |
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For the "J" team: Joana Cotler, Justin Chanda, Jessica Shulsinger
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Dallas leaned far out of the window, his eyes fixed on a bird flying lazily in the distance.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0060560150, Paperback)

Having suffered through a string of appalling foster homes (the spitting Cranbepps; scary, toothless Mr. Dreep who locked them in his cellar; and the mean Burgerton boys), 13-year-old orphan Dallas and his twin sister, Florida, have pretty much given up on ever finding a happy home. So when an eccentric older couple enters their lives, providing such adventures as a river expedition, a treasure hunt (of sorts), and a whole lot of remarkable meals: "beat-the-blues broccoli," "anti-cranky crumpets," and "getting-used-to-kids- again stew," the twins take a while to warm up. Florida's language teems with outrageous, telling negativity--everything is "putrid"--and even dreamy Dallas is inclined to bouts of doubt. But warm up they do, to the continual delight of readers of all ages.

Sharon Creech, author of Newbery Medal winner Walk Two Moons and Newbery Honor book The Wanderer, is in fine form with her hilarious yet poignant novel about downtrodden siblings who refuse to be squished altogether. The perfectly happy ending is somewhat predictable, but readers who have fallen in love with each quirky character won't mind a bit. (Ages 8 to 13) --Emilie Coulter

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:12:08 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

Thirteen-year-old fraternal twins Dallas and Florida have grown up in a terrible orphanage but their lives change forever when an eccentric but sweet older couple invites them each on an adventure, beginning in an almost magical place called Ruby Holler.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

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