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Scots-Irish Links, 1575-1725. Part Nine by…
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Scots-Irish Links, 1575-1725. Part Nine

by David Dobson

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0806356197, Paperback)

During the 17th century, as many as 100,000 Scottish Lowlanders relocated to the Plantation of Ulster (Northern Ireland). Within a few generations, the descendants of these Ulster Scots emigrated in substantial numbers across the Atlantic, where, as the Scotch-Irish (Scots-Irish), they made a major contribution to the settlement and development of colonial America. This is the ninth part in a series compiled by Mr. Dobson to identify the Lowland Scots who migrated to Ulster between 1575 and 1725--many of whose progeny may have immigrated to America. For this volume Mr. Dobson relied on primary sources and publications found in Scotland, Ireland, and England. Some of his principal sources include the Calendar of Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland, the Alumni Dublinensis, and Archaeological and Historical Collections, Ayrshire and Galloway. As with previous volumes, each listing provides the inhabitant's name, occupation, place of residence, a date, and the source. In some instances, Mr. Dobson gives quite a bit more, as in: Montgomery, Anna, second daughter of Sir Robert Montgomery of Skelmorlie, a process of divorce dated 2 February 1693 against her husband Captain James Marshall, late merchant in Newporton, County Fermanagh, whom she married in Edinburgh in February 1692.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:05 -0400)

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