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Weary: King of the River by Sue Ebury
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Weary: King of the River

by Sue Ebury

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Recently added bybuistwa, martinh1, oskarballmer, TheWasp

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In 1930 Ernest Edward Dunlop was admitted to Ormond College in Melbourne to study medicine. As part of his "initiation" he was given the nickname "Weary", a name by which he was known for the rest of his life. He was a good student and excellent sportsman and graduated in the top of his year. As a young surgeon he went to London to work and he was there when WWII began. He joined the Australian Medical Corp without ever returning to Australia and served in Palestine, Tobruk and Greece. He then went to South East Asia and was enslaved by the Japanese following the fall of Singapore. He spent 3 years as a POW on the Thai-Burma Railway, many times placing himself between the Japanese and his men.He took many risks for his men such as secreting diaries/pictures which he brought back to Australia. He was skilled at providing surgical services under such difficult circumstances and his implementation of hygiene measures saved many lives. After the war he returned to Australia and resumed his career as a successful surgeon. He was also a great advocate of financial, medical & rehabilitative support for the soldier by Australian Government. He maintained a close relationship with many of his army mates all his life and when he died in 1993, a few days short of his 86th birthday, 10,000 people stood silently while he was farewelled. A remarkable man. ( )
  TheWasp | May 4, 2013 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0522856969, Hardcover)

Thorough and noteworthy, this biography explores the life of Sir Edward “Weary” Dunlop, an Australian surgeon who was held captive by the Japanese during World War II. With more than 150 images as well as never-before-published material about Dunlop’s betrayal of his captors, this comprehensive account examines the precarious moments Dunlop survived, including wartime starvation, disease, brutality, and near executions. Having selflessly worked to save lives in the notorious work and hospital camps along the Burma-Thailand railway, Dunlop, known for his courage and compassion, became an Australian legend.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:08:34 -0400)

AU Author. Sir Ernest Edward "Weary" Dunlop was the type of rare individual who inspires others to impossible feats by example. Born and raised in Victoria, Australia, he qualified as a pharmacist and surgeon. When World War II broke out, he was appointed a surgeon to the Emergency Medical Unit, spending time in Greece and Africa before he was transferred to Java. As commanding officer and surgeon in the POW camps of the Japanese, he became a legend to thousands of Allied prisoners whose lives were saved with meagre medical supplies. In those camps, at great personal risk, he recorded the deprivation and despair of the men under his command.Australian History.… (more)

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