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Mud Season: How One Woman's Dream of…
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Mud Season: How One Woman's Dream of Moving to Vermont, Raising…

by Ellen Stimson

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879138,736 (2.97)2

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Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
Skimmed through the last half of the book. What started out as a would-be fish out of water, quirky adventure, soon devolved into an annoying, self-absorbed litany of the author's personality flaws. If I lived in the Vermont town the author steamrolled her way through, I would have wanted her dead within the first half-hour. ( )
1 vote montroyal04 | Sep 15, 2014 |
I really wanted to like this book. In fact, I have to admit that it started well. But by the end of it, I found I had a visceral distaste of the author. Entitled, snobbish, holier-than-thou; those are just a few words to describe her. How anyone who claims to be an expert business person can make so many ill-advised, nay, stupid, decisions is beyond me. The woman is clueless! In her defense, maybe she doesn't realize how bad her decisions are, because before they play out, she abandons the situation and dumps them on someone else (drive your car in a snowbank, call your husband to get it out while you take a hot bath; take a successful business and drive it into the ground because you think you know more than anyone else, no problem, dump it on your husband and take a job in a different state; children out of control, must be the teacher's fault). Doesn't like her former business partner, her mother, the local townspeople, teachers, preachers, etc. Bankrupt and losing a business? No problem, take a vacation and order a barn built so she can raise a darned sheep! I feel sorry for her husband (he must be a saint), her family, and for the townspeople of her new town. And for myself, for wasting the time to read this book. ( )
  1Randal | Aug 25, 2014 |
I really wanted to like this book. In fact, I have to admit that it started well. But by the end of it, I found I had a visceral distaste of the author. Entitled, snobbish, holier-than-thou; those are just a few words to describe her. How anyone who claims to be an expert business person can make so many ill-advised, nay, stupid, decisions is beyond me. The woman is clueless! In her defense, maybe she doesn't realize how bad her decisions are, because before they play out, she abandons the situation and dumps them on someone else (drive your car in a snowbank, call your husband to get it out while you take a hot bath; take a successful business and drive it into the ground because you think you know more than anyone else, no problem, dump it on your husband and take a job in a different state; children out of control, must be the teacher's fault). Doesn't like her former business partner, her mother, the local townspeople, teachers, preachers, etc. Bankrupt and losing a business? No problem, take a vacation and order a barn built so she can raise a darned sheep! I feel sorry for her husband (he must be a saint), her family, and for the townspeople of her new town. And for myself, for wasting the time to read this book. ( )
  1Randal | Aug 25, 2014 |
I really wanted to like this book. In fact, I have to admit that it started well. But by the end of it, I found I had a visceral distaste of the author. Entitled, snobbish, holier-than-thou; those are just a few words to describe her. How anyone who claims to be an expert business person can make so many ill-advised, nay, stupid, decisions is beyond me. The woman is clueless! In her defense, maybe she doesn't realize how bad her decisions are, because before they play out, she abandons the situation and dumps them on someone else (drive your car in a snowbank, call your husband to get it out while you take a hot bath; take a successful business and drive it into the ground because you think you know more than anyone else, no problem, dump it on your husband and take a job in a different state; children out of control, must be the teacher's fault). Doesn't like her former business partner, her mother, the local townspeople, teachers, preachers, etc. Bankrupt and losing a business? No problem, take a vacation and order a barn built so she can raise a darned sheep! I feel sorry for her husband (he must be a saint), her family, and for the townspeople of her new town. And for myself, for wasting the time to read this book. ( )
  1Randal | Aug 25, 2014 |
What started off as a funny book ended up as a train wreck. This lady might be fun to have at parties, but I would never want to depend on her for anything. ( )
  Jillian_Kay | Jan 8, 2014 |
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Chronicles the author's transition from city life to rural life in Vermont where she and her family, deciding to operate one of the oldest country stores in America, are faced with opposition and distrust by local residents who disliked change.

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