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In Translation: Translators on Their Work…
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In Translation: Translators on Their Work and What It Means (2013)

by Esther Allen (Editor), Susan Bernofsky (Editor)

Other authors: David Bellos (Contributor), Susan Bernofsky (Contributor), Peter Cole (Contributor), Maureen Freely (Contributor), Forrest Gander (Contributor)9 more, Ted Goossen (Contributor), Jason Grunebaum (Contributor), Alice Kaplan (Contributor), Christi A. Merrill (Contributor), Haruki Murakami (Contributor), Catherine Porter (Contributor), José Manuel Prieto (Contributor), Lawrence Venuti (Contributor), Eliot Weinberger (Contributor)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
I've loved almost all of the translated work I've read and even those which aren't my favorite have been enjoyable for their novelty, so I was excited to pick up this anthology of essays by translators about their work. The first essay was a bit a of a let down though, too academic and abstract for my taste. Fortunately, very few essays in the collection had this flaw. Essay two, for example, provided immediate gratification with a discussion of the way translations are allowed to flout literary conventions, which resonated with me as one of my favorite features of the genre.

There were a few essays which I thought became too pedantic or talked about a text without sharing enough of the translation for me to follow. For the most part, though, the essays were easy to read but thought-provoking and raised issues I thought were relevant to me as a reader of translations. The middle portion of the book discussed an incredible range of issues translators can encounter which never occurred to me before. Some of the questions I found most interesting were whether translators should prioritize capturing the feel of the work they're translating or the exact meaning and how translators should handle words without exact matches in the language they're translating into. The essays at the end helped me understand what motivates translators. An essay by Murakami about translating The Great Gatsby was one of my favorites from this section.

Even there were a few essays in this collection which I didn't enjoy, the vast majority were both intellectually stimulating and fun reading. I think reading these essays will make me a better consumer of translated fiction, more aware of how translating works and which parts of the original are likely to be preserved through the translation process. I'm also going to try to do a better job giving translators a byline on my blog when I read translated work, because good translators are often overlooked. If you're someone who likes reading translated fiction or are interested in how languages differ from one another, I'd highly recommend this collection.This review was originally posted on Doing Dewey. ( )
  DoingDewey | Feb 6, 2015 |
I've loved almost all of the translated work I've read and even those which aren't my favorite have been enjoyable for their novelty, so I was excited to pick up this anthology of essays by translators about their work. The first essay was a bit a of a let down though, too academic and abstract for my taste. Fortunately, very few essays in the collection had this flaw. Essay two, for example, provided immediate gratification with a discussion of the way translations are allowed to flout literary conventions, which resonated with me as one of my favorite features of the genre.

There were a few essays which I thought became too pedantic or talked about a text without sharing enough of the translation for me to follow. For the most part, though, the essays were easy to read but thought-provoking and raised issues I thought were relevant to me as a reader of translations. The middle portion of the book discussed an incredible range of issues translators can encounter which never occurred to me before. Some of the questions I found most interesting were whether translators should prioritize capturing the feel of the work they're translating or the exact meaning and how translators should handle words without exact matches in the language they're translating into. The essays at the end helped me understand what motivates translators. An essay by Murakami about translating The Great Gatsby was one of my favorites from this section.

Even there were a few essays in this collection which I didn't enjoy, the vast majority were both intellectually stimulating and fun reading. I think reading these essays will make me a better consumer of translated fiction, more aware of how translating works and which parts of the original are likely to be preserved through the translation process. I'm also going to try to do a better job giving translators a byline on my blog when I read translated work, because good translators are often overlooked. If you're someone who likes reading translated fiction or are interested in how languages differ from one another, I'd highly recommend this collection.This review was originally posted on Doing Dewey. ( )
  DoingDewey | Feb 6, 2015 |
I've loved almost all of the translated work I've read and even those which aren't my favorite have been enjoyable for their novelty, so I was excited to pick up this anthology of essays by translators about their work. The first essay was a bit a of a let down though, too academic and abstract for my taste. Fortunately, very few essays in the collection had this flaw. Essay two, for example, provided immediate gratification with a discussion of the way translations are allowed to flout literary conventions, which resonated with me as one of my favorite features of the genre.

There were a few essays which I thought became too pedantic or talked about a text without sharing enough of the translation for me to follow. For the most part, though, the essays were easy to read but thought-provoking and raised issues I thought were relevant to me as a reader of translations. The middle portion of the book discussed an incredible range of issues translators can encounter which never occurred to me before. Some of the questions I found most interesting were whether translators should prioritize capturing the feel of the work they're translating or the exact meaning and how translators should handle words without exact matches in the language they're translating into. The essays at the end helped me understand what motivates translators. An essay by Murakami about translating The Great Gatsby was one of my favorites from this section.

Even there were a few essays in this collection which I didn't enjoy, the vast majority were both intellectually stimulating and fun reading. I think reading these essays will make me a better consumer of translated fiction, more aware of how translating works and which parts of the original are likely to be preserved through the translation process. I'm also going to try to do a better job giving translators a byline on my blog when I read translated work, because good translators are often overlooked. If you're someone who likes reading translated fiction or are interested in how languages differ from one another, I'd highly recommend this collection.This review was originally posted on Doing Dewey. ( )
  DoingDewey | Feb 6, 2015 |
I've loved almost all of the translated work I've read and even those which aren't my favorite have been enjoyable for their novelty, so I was excited to pick up this anthology of essays by translators about their work. The first essay was a bit a of a let down though, too academic and abstract for my taste. Fortunately, very few essays in the collection had this flaw. Essay two, for example, provided immediate gratification with a discussion of the way translations are allowed to flout literary conventions, which resonated with me as one of my favorite features of the genre.

There were a few essays which I thought became too pedantic or talked about a text without sharing enough of the translation for me to follow. For the most part, though, the essays were easy to read but thought-provoking and raised issues I thought were relevant to me as a reader of translations. The middle portion of the book discussed an incredible range of issues translators can encounter which never occurred to me before. Some of the questions I found most interesting were whether translators should prioritize capturing the feel of the work they're translating or the exact meaning and how translators should handle words without exact matches in the language they're translating into. The essays at the end helped me understand what motivates translators. An essay by Murakami about translating The Great Gatsby was one of my favorites from this section.

Even there were a few essays in this collection which I didn't enjoy, the vast majority were both intellectually stimulating and fun reading. I think reading these essays will make me a better consumer of translated fiction, more aware of how translating works and which parts of the original are likely to be preserved through the translation process. I'm also going to try to do a better job giving translators a byline on my blog when I read translated work, because good translators are often overlooked. If you're someone who likes reading translated fiction or are interested in how languages differ from one another, I'd highly recommend this collection.This review was originally posted on Doing Dewey. ( )
  DoingDewey | Feb 6, 2015 |
I've loved almost all of the translated work I've read and even those which aren't my favorite have been enjoyable for their novelty, so I was excited to pick up this anthology of essays by translators about their work. The first essay was a bit a of a let down though, too academic and abstract for my taste. Fortunately, very few essays in the collection had this flaw. Essay two, for example, provided immediate gratification with a discussion of the way translations are allowed to flout literary conventions, which resonated with me as one of my favorite features of the genre.

There were a few essays which I thought became too pedantic or talked about a text without sharing enough of the translation for me to follow. For the most part, though, the essays were easy to read but thought-provoking and raised issues I thought were relevant to me as a reader of translations. The middle portion of the book discussed an incredible range of issues translators can encounter which never occurred to me before. Some of the questions I found most interesting were whether translators should prioritize capturing the feel of the work they're translating or the exact meaning and how translators should handle words without exact matches in the language they're translating into. The essays at the end helped me understand what motivates translators. An essay by Murakami about translating The Great Gatsby was one of my favorites from this section.

Even there were a few essays in this collection which I didn't enjoy, the vast majority were both intellectually stimulating and fun reading. I think reading these essays will make me a better consumer of translated fiction, more aware of how translating works and which parts of the original are likely to be preserved through the translation process. I'm also going to try to do a better job giving translators a byline on my blog when I read translated work, because good translators are often overlooked. If you're someone who likes reading translated fiction or are interested in how languages differ from one another, I'd highly recommend this collection.This review was originally posted on Doing Dewey. ( )
  DoingDewey | Feb 6, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Allen, EstherEditorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bernofsky, SusanEditormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Bellos, DavidContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bernofsky, SusanContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Cole, PeterContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Freely, MaureenContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gander, ForrestContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Goossen, TedContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Grunebaum, JasonContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kaplan, AliceContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Merrill, Christi A.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Murakami, HarukiContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Porter, CatherineContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Prieto, José ManuelContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Venuti, LawrenceContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Weinberger, EliotContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Allen, EstherTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Goossen, TedTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kushnirsky, JuliaCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0231159692, Paperback)

The most comprehensive collection of perspectives on translation to date, this anthology features essays by some of the world's most skillful writers and translators, including Haruki Murakami, Alice Kaplan, Peter Cole, Eliot Weinberger, Forrest Gander, Clare Cavanagh, David Bellos, and José Manuel Prieto. Discussing the process and possibilities of their art, they cast translation as a fine balance between scholarly and creative expression. The volume provides students and professionals with much-needed guidance on technique and style, while affirming for all readers the cultural, political, and aesthetic relevance of translation.

These essays focus on a diverse group of languages, including Japanese, Turkish, Arabic, and Hindi, as well as frequently encountered European languages, such as French, Spanish, Italian, German, Polish, and Russian. Contributors speak on craft, aesthetic choices, theoretical approaches, and the politics of global cultural exchange, touching on the concerns and challenges that currently affect translators working in an era of globalization. Responding to the growing popularity of translation programs, literature in translation, and the increasing need to cultivate versatile practitioners, this anthology serves as a definitive resource for those seeking a modern understanding of the craft.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:16:26 -0400)

A collection of perspectives on translation, this anthology features essays by some of the world's most skillful writers and translators, including Haruki Murakami, Alice Kaplan, Peter Cole, Eliot Weinberger, Forrest Gander, Clare Cavanagh, David Bellos, and Jose Manuel Prieto. Discussing the process and possibilities of their art, they cast translation as a fine balance between scholarly and creative expression. The volume provides guidance on technique and style, while affirming for all readers the cultural, political, and aesthetic relevance of translation. These essays focus on a diverse group of languages, including Japanese, Turkish, Arabic, and Hindi, as well as frequently encountered European languages, such as French, Spanish, Italian, German, Polish, and Russian. Contributors speak on craft, aesthetic choices, theoretical approaches, and the politics of global cultural exchange, touching on the concerns and challenges that currently affect translators working in an era of globalization. Responding to the growing popularity of translation programs, literature in translation, and the increasing need to cultivate versatile practitioners, this anthology serves as a definitive resource for those seeking a modern understanding of the craft.… (more)

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