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Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull…
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Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t

by Simon Sinek

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This book is OK, but not ground breaking. Summarised in one sentence it's: "Look after your people and they will look after your company." but Sinek uses a bookload more words to repeat the same thing many times.

He does go into some detail about why the world is in such a state (hint: because if the baby boomers) and explains how we got here, which is interesting. ( )
  MikePearce | Jun 19, 2017 |
Meh. Within this book, Sinek summaries my own experience reading his book: "This is no soapbox rambling. It is just biology." Actually, it is soapbox rambling.

Although unsurprising based on his background, Sinek writes from a heavily military-oriented perspective. I found myself needing to inject "she", "her", "they", and "their" an awful lot because this book reads old fashioned. It makes the female workforce somewhat invisible by omission.

Content I found useful:
* "A consumer is just that: an abstraction of a person who we hope will consume whatever we have to offer."
* "It is not the abundance we need to manage or restrict, it is the abstraction."
* "Give authority to those closest to the information."
* "'At 3M ... We never throw an idea away because you never know when someone else will need it.'"

Content that turned me off:
* "The world around us is filled with danger. Filled with things trying to make our lives miserable." Is this a given.
* "Letting someone into an organization is like adopting a child." By that logic, I should have felt like an adopted child several times over by now. Furthermore, what parent has adopted 100s - 1000s of children.
* "Without oxytocin, we would have no partner [with whom] to raise our children." Two words (with whom) could have completely changed the meaning of this sentence, but unfortunately I do not think that is what the author intended. At best, it is unclear.
* "This is the feeling we get when we all hold hands and sing 'Kumbaya' together."
* "We have no problem with someone who outranks us at work making more money than us, getting a bigger office or a better parking space." To what extent is this true.
( )
  ursula-gaosili | Oct 23, 2016 |
Some good stories, but retread of many old studies with conclusions that stretch the edges of credulity. And how do you take someone seriously who morally equates legally reducing your tax burden with putting lives at risk by ignoring safety issues? Primarily the book had a point to make regarding how chemicals control your responses, and the author cherry-picked stories (sometimes shading the truth a bit) to support his point. Pass. ( )
  mdubois | Sep 7, 2016 |
rating 3.25

In this book, Sinek talks of the benefits of working for a company where the leaders value people over profit. He talks of study after study on how companies who value their people tend to be more successful long term than those who look to slash people to raise profit. Lots of examples of companies who are working hard to make sure their people trust them. There was a quote in the book that really solidified the thought, would you want to be in a foxhole with your management. Would you trust them in the hardest of times to know they would screw you over. Another quote on the point was when things get tight in the family, you don't just cut the children. ( )
  JWarrenBenton | Jan 4, 2016 |
rating 3.25

In this book, Sinek talks of the benefits of working for a company where the leaders value people over profit. He talks of study after study on how companies who value their people tend to be more successful long term than those who look to slash people to raise profit. Lots of examples of companies who are working hard to make sure their people trust them. There was a quote in the book that really solidified the thought, would you want to be in a foxhole with your management. Would you trust them in the hardest of times to know they would screw you over. Another quote on the point was when things get tight in the family, you don't just cut the children. ( )
  JWarrenBenton | Jan 4, 2016 |
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Epigraph
Leaders are the ones who run headfirst into the unknown.
They rush toward the danger.
They put their own interests aside to protect us or to pull us into the future.
Leaders would sooner sacrifice what is theirs to save what is ours.
And they would never sacrifice what is ours to save what is theirs.
This is what it means to be a leader.
It means they choose to go first into danger, headfirst toward the unknown.
And when we feel sure they will keep us safe,
we will march behind them and work tirelessly to see their visions come to life
and proudly call ourselves their followers.
Dedication
To the men and women I've met in the United States Air Force - You have taught me more about what it means to be human than anyone who wears a suit ever did.
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A thick layer of clouds blocked out any light.
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" The highly anticipated follow-up to the acclaimed bestseller Start With Why Simon Sinek's mission is to help people wake up every day inspired to go to work and return home every night fulfilled by their work. His first book, Start With Why, offered the essential starting point, explaining the power of focusing on WHY we do what we do, before getting into the details of WHAT and HOW. Start With Why became an instant classic, with a loyal following among Fortune 500 companies, entrepreneurs, nonprofits, governments, and the highest levels of the U.S. Military. Now Sinek is back to reveal the next step in creating happier and healthier organizations. He helps us understand, in simple terms, the biology of trust and cooperation and why they're essential to our success and fulfillment. Organizations that create environments in which trust and cooperation thrive vastly out perform their competition. And, not coincidentally, their employees love working there. But "truly human" cultures don't just happen; they are intentionally created by great leaders. Leaders who, in hard times, would sooner sacrifice their numbers to protect their people, rather than sacrifice people to protect their numbers, are rewarded with deeply loyal teams that consistently contribute their best efforts, ideas and passion. As he did in Start With Why, Sinek illustrates his points with fascinating true stories from many fields. He implores us to act sooner rather than later, because our stressful jobs are literally killing us. And he offers surprisingly simple steps for building a truly human organization"--"Sinek is back to reveal the next step in creating happier and healthier organizations. He helps us understand, in simple terms, the biology of trust and cooperation and why they're essential to our success and fulfillment. Organizations that create environments in which trust and cooperation thrive vastly out perform their competition. And, not coincidentally, their employees love working there. But "truly human" cultures don't just happen; they are intentionally created by great leaders. Leaders who, in hard times, would sooner sacrifice their numbers to protect their people, rather than sacrifice people to protect their numbers, are rewarded with deeply loyal teams that consistently contribute their best efforts, ideas and passion. As he did in Start With Why, Sinek illustrates his points with fascinating true stories from many fields. He implores us to act sooner rather than later, because our stressful jobs are literally killing us. And he offers surprisingly simple steps for building a truly human organization"--… (more)

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