HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Journal Of A Residence In America (1835) by…
Loading...

Journal Of A Residence In America (1835)

by Fanny Kemble

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
222,551,640 (2)None
Recently added byR0BIN

No tags.

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 2 of 2
Fanny Kemble was a very famous 19th century British actress and author who traveled the world, married one of her groupies who inherited a plantation with hundreds of slaves, divorced him and became an outspoken advocate of abolition. She belonged to a theatrical family; her father, aunt and uncle were famous actors and her sister was an opera singer. Fanny kept extensive journals commenting on everything. Her diary [b:Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation 1838-1839|9844407|Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation 1838-1839|Frances Anne Kemble|http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41eOmqx7TnL._SL75_.jpg|14735237] was published before the Civil War, she spoke against slavery and donated money to the abolitionist movement.

Rather than read one of the biographies like [b:Fanny Kemble's Civil War|220087|Fanny Kemble's Civil War|Catherine Clinton|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1172807759s/220087.jpg|2290419], I thought that I would go straight to the source and read her journals. I expected her to write in a Victorian style so that wasn't a surprise but every couple of pages she goes off on some tangent. She would see a sunrise and then go on and on about it actually saying nothing at all. Three more pages of substance and then a page on the moonlight, two pages on ocean waves, a page on rose petals. After a while these "spells" got so boring that when I recognized the beginning of one of them I would skip a page.

Although her memoirs were published many years after they were written, the author blanked out all the names of people. All men, except her father and a couple of famous people who were mentioned in passing (like Lord Byron and presidents of the U.S.) were called Mr.---- and all women were Miss---- or Mrs.----. So it was impossible to keep track of who was present or who was speaking. So many paragraphs look like: Mr. and Mrs.---- joined us for dinner but Mr.---- declined our invitation. Mr.---- brought me a nosegay. Mr.---- sang for us. As he was leaving Mr.---- invited me to go riding but father and I had a prior appointment with Mr.----."

Fanny Kemble lived an intense and interesting life but, unless you have a specific interest in reading her journals as she wrote them, I would recommend reading an edited version like Catherine Clinton's [b:Fanny Kemble's Journals|1042570|Fanny Kemble's Journals|Fanny Kemble|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1180458972s/1042570.jpg|1028971] ( )
  R0BIN | Apr 27, 2013 |
Fanny Kemble was a very famous 19th century British actress and author who traveled the world, married one of her groupies who inherited a plantation with hundreds of slaves, divorced him and became an outspoken advocate of abolition. She belonged to a theatrical family; her father, aunt and uncle were famous actors and her sister was an opera singer. Fanny kept extensive journals commenting on everything. Her diary [b:Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation 1838-1839|9844407|Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation 1838-1839|Frances Anne Kemble|http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41eOmqx7TnL._SL75_.jpg|14735237] was published before the Civil War, she spoke against slavery and donated money to the abolitionist movement.

Rather than read one of the biographies like [b:Fanny Kemble's Civil War|220087|Fanny Kemble's Civil War|Catherine Clinton|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1172807759s/220087.jpg|2290419], I thought that I would go straight to the source and read her journals. I expected her to write in a Victorian style so that wasn't a surprise but every couple of pages she goes off on some tangent. She would see a sunrise and then go on and on about it actually saying nothing at all. Three more pages of substance and then a page on the moonlight, two pages on ocean waves, a page on rose petals. After a while these "spells" got so boring that when I recognized the beginning of one of them I would skip a page.

Although her memoirs were published many years after they were written, the author blanked out all the names of people. All men, except her father and a couple of famous people who were mentioned in passing (like Lord Byron and presidents of the U.S.) were called Mr.---- and all women were Miss---- or Mrs.----. So it was impossible to keep track of who was present or who was speaking. So many paragraphs look like: Mr. and Mrs.---- joined us for dinner but Mr.---- declined our invitation. Mr.---- brought me a nosegay. Mr.---- sang for us. As he was leaving Mr.---- invited me to go riding but father and I had a prior appointment with Mr.----."

Fanny Kemble lived an intense and interesting life but, unless you have a specific interest in reading her journals as she wrote them, I would recommend reading an edited version like Catherine Clinton's [b:Fanny Kemble's Journals|1042570|Fanny Kemble's Journals|Fanny Kemble|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1180458972s/1042570.jpg|1028971] ( )
  R0BIN | Apr 27, 2013 |
Showing 2 of 2
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0548566860, Paperback)

This book is a facsimile reprint and may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:15 -0400)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (2)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3
3.5
4
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 126,401,223 books! | Top bar: Always visible