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Tambu - The True Story Of An Interstellar…
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Tambu - The True Story Of An Interstellar Genghis Khan (original 1979; edition 1979)

by Robert Lynn Asprin

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1394121,974 (3)2
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Title:Tambu - The True Story Of An Interstellar Genghis Khan
Authors:Robert Lynn Asprin
Info:Ace Books (1979), Paperback
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Tambu by Robert Asprin (1979)

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Showing 4 of 4
Interesting meditation on power and what makes a hero/villain. It's not a philosophical treatise, but it is both entertaining and thought-provoking. As a sidenote, I found the portrayal of the female characters refreshingly nuanced and egalitarian (something that isn't always guaranteed in classic sci-fi). ( )
  brleach | Jan 26, 2015 |
Typical of Asprin's stories, this one contains exciting events and ethical speculations. I disagree with the protagonist's conclusions about his choices. "Tambu" feels like he was forced to condone actions by others that he found morally reprehensible, in pursuit of a greater cause. However, his reasoning was specious and self-serving. We are asked to sympathize with the personal angst of a man who made himself into a dictatorial tyrant and murderer, although he could have opted out of the situation anytime he chose. (Note to "The Angry Humanists" in re the forward to that anthology: you can't blame Tambu's problems or deficiencies on religion; he is a classic case of the flaws in humanist philosophy.) ( )
  booklog | Apr 14, 2009 |
see Booklog ( )
  librisissimo | Apr 13, 2009 |
This book was definitely different from the other Asprin books I’ve read. He’s a great writer, though, and it was interesting, if not a little hokey at the ending. The book was not funny like most of the author’s other works. It was written as an interview with an infamous interstellar fleet commander, with flashbacks to scenes as they’re being explained to the interviewer. It’s mostly an exploration of good and evil, and whether we should judge good or evil by a person’s actions or by their intent. Not a bad book, but I won’t be re-reading it any time soon. ( )
  Homechicken | Nov 19, 2007 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Robert Asprinprimary authorall editionscalculated
Morrill, RowenaCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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