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Family by M.C.A. Hogarth
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Member:jjmcgaffey
Title:Family
Authors:M.C.A. Hogarth
Info:M.C.A. Hogarth
Collections:Read, Read this year, ebooks, Working on
Rating:****
Tags:!Po, Fic, SF, __make_cover, _import180329

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Family by M. C. A. Hogarth (2011)

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There's a lot of story stuffed into this short piece - it's hard to keep track of what's going on (and the dream/vision sequence doesn't help. Interesting in light of their techniques, though). We learn a _lot_ about the Eldritch, as does Vasiht'h - and most of it is not all that pleasant. Lots of hints about what Jahir is doing out in the Alliance, and what his mother and his Queen want from him in so doing, come together here; the story integrates parts of the long arc that haven't been clear. That aside, it's nice to see the two of them in a smooth, long-established partnership (and it's a good thing they didn't go back to the Eldritch homeworld any earlier!). They've been working together for 10+ years, at the start of the story. And it takes all the practice of those years to manage some of the things Vasiht'h learns in this story - from Jahir's position to how most of the Eldritch regard him and other Pelted (actually, other non-Eldritch). Good story, worth reading. More, please! ( )
  jjmcgaffey | Apr 17, 2018 |
After reading several Jahir and Vasiht'h short stories and vignettes, I was happy to see that this was novella-length – I seem to like Hogarth's longer works more.

Jahir and Vasiht'h have now been working together for 10 years or so. Their partnership is a comfortable one, but, because of the Veil and Eldritch xenophobia, there are lots of things Jahir has never been able to tell Vasiht'h. In Family, this changes. One of Jahir's cousins is getting married, and Jahir's mother specifically asked that Vasiht'h come with him as a guest. Aliens are not welcome on the Eldritch homeworld, but Jahir figures his mother has her reasons, so he and Vasiht'h set off to attend the wedding.

Like Vasiht'h, I was excited at the thought of finally getting to see the Eldritch homeworld. All I knew for sure was that it would be technologically backward – no showers, horses used for transportation, no medical technology to speak of. I figured that meant it'd be some kind of pseudo-Middle Ages Europe.

Life in the Galare manor was much like I expected it to be. There were a few mentions here and there of servants, although I never got to learn as much about them as I would have liked. The real surprises came when Vasiht'h visited a town near the manor. It was...worse that I expected. While this new information certainly put Jahir's desperation to leave his homeworld and learn something that might help his people in a new, starker light, my suspension of disbelief was strained. I honestly don't understand how Eldritch civilization has survived for as long as it has, and I'm still not sure I can wrap my brain around what an Eldritch commoner's life must be like.

The primary reason I picked Family up was because of Jahir and Vasiht'h and, in that area, I was rewarded. Their relationship in Mindtouch was, for the most part, amazingly smooth and easy. The events in this novella put more strain on their relationship than I've seen in any other work they've been in.

First, there were Vasiht'h feelings of awkwardness and embarrassment around most of the other Eldritch. He didn't know how to act, he didn't know what they were saying unless he was near enough to Jahir to make use of their mindline, he was under-dressed compared to them, and his very existence was looked down upon. Second, Jahir himself made Vasiht'h feel awkward. He was painfully aware of Jahir's wealth and status, in a way he'd never been before. Third, there was a lot going on that Jahir hadn't given Vasiht'h any warning about, and Vasiht'h being there made some of it worse. And fourth, there were repeated reminders that Jahir would likely outlive Vasiht'h by hundreds of years. Vasiht'h was forced to think about their partnership in the long term and how he wanted things to go past the point of his own death.

Some of this was stuff that had occurred to Vasiht'h before, but that he hadn't sat down and really thought about, and some of it came as a shock. In any case, all of it kept Vasiht'h unsteady, and Jahir couldn't do much to help him and comfort him, because he was busy being an Eldritch noble about to attend a wedding scattered with political eggshells. They spent more time separated than I expected, although it did make the “you and me, we're still okay” moments even sweeter.

While it was nice to recognize bits and pieces of other Jahir and Vasiht'h works in this one, it was also distracting. My brain kept looking for inconsistencies and continuity errors. The most jarring moment was when it was revealed that Sediryl, Jahir's cousin, probably played a part in Jahir's decision to leave his homeworld, because of his intense, secret, and forbidden feelings for her. She was passionate, fierce, and fun to read about, but Jahir's reaction to her inspired vague continuity unease in me. I remembered Jahir desperately wanting to get away from his homeworld's stagnation, but that was it. I did a quick keyword search of Mindtouch and found several mentions of Sediryl that I had forgotten, but none of the depth of emotion I would have expected the name to conjure up in Jahir, considering his reaction to her in this novella. I'm not sure if this is some kind of character continuity issue or not – I'd have to reread Mindtouch to be sure – but it bugged me.

Although I felt it had some issues, I still really liked Family. It had several of the elements I've come to love in Hogarth's works: fascinating details about alien cultures, characters I care about, and great conversations.

Rating Note: I struggled with choosing a rating for this. I wanted to give it 4 stars, because it was so nice to see Jahir and Vasiht'h having to deal with their own relationship, personal, and family issues again. At the same time, 3.5 stars seemed more appropriate for the overall story. I decided to give the characters more weight and give it 4 stars. Booklikes and LibraryThing's half stars are making me greedy - now I'm beginning to want quarter stars.

(Original review, with read-alikes and watch-alikes, posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.) ( )
1 vote Familiar_Diversions | Dec 7, 2013 |
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