HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

A House in the Sky: A Memoir by Amanda…
Loading...

A House in the Sky: A Memoir

by Amanda Lindhout, Sara Corbett

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6804320,845 (4.15)69
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 69 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 44 (next | show all)
This book was incredible. I had a hard time putting it down. It was written so beautifully detailed that I could see everything in my mind, even when I didn't want to. I couldn't even attempt to put myself in her shoes, but I kept imagining what I would've done if I was her and I don't think I could ever be as strong as she was. She is a resilient human being, that's for sure. This was a shockingly sad book - it actually brought me to tears. A hard book to get through sometimes but well worth the read. One of the better books I've read in a long time. Do I think she was stupid to even go to Somalia? Of course! But NO ONE deserves to be treated like that, no matter what. This book shows how tragic women's lives are in a fundamentalist society (of any religion). ( )
  thisismelissaanne | Oct 29, 2018 |
Because it is a memoir, I knew that she lived to tell the tale. Despite the cerebral understanding that she is alive today, I was nonetheless beside myself with anxiety reading her tale of capture, torture, and rescue. The title of the novel refers to a mental space she cleared for herself in order to withstand the trauma her every waking moment held during the nearly a year and a half she was held in captivity. A House in the Sky, a far-away place with staircase upon staircase revealing spacious, well-lit rooms with books, coffee, cats, and warm blankets. A House where she could escape from the harrowing reality of being the captive of Fundamentalist Muslim Somalians.
There is a section of the book where the author is kept in absolute darkness. The writing in this section is not only impeccable but the ways Amanda kept herself sane are nothing short of miraculous. Listen to this:
"My mattress floated like a raft in the middle of a black ocean. The darkness surrounding me had substance. It had weight. It was thick like tar, catching in my throat and gumming up my lungs. I had to coach myself how to breathe it. There were moments when the darkness seemed aggressive, like it was trying to swallow me. I'd hold a hand in front of my face and see nothing. I fanned my arms, attempting to create wind, to exert some power over the dark. Sometimes I pressed the hallow at the base of my neck, just to remind myself that I was solid."
Whew...this is just one of the many moments where Amanda struggles so hard against the reality. I bought this book because I love memoirs and the number of high starred reviews was crazy impressive for a memoir. I downloaded it without even reading what it was about. I'm grateful that Amanda survived and shared such an incredible tale of survival with the world. ( )
  ambersnowpants | Aug 23, 2018 |
This is an important book about a Canadian journalist (Amanda Lindhout) who was kidnapped in Somalia and held for over a year. She tells about the treatment (including torture and sexual assault) that she endured, where and how she found strength, and how she survived both physically and emotionally. It is a very honest portrait, well written and worth reading. ( )
  LynnB | Jun 27, 2018 |
"The dramatic and redemptive memoir of a woman hose curiosity lad her to the
world's most beautiful and remote places, its most imperiled and perilous
countries, and then into fifteen months of harrowing captivity - an exquisitely
written story of courage, resilience, and grace." --jacket
  collectionmcc | Mar 6, 2018 |
I think the story of Lindhout’s kidnapping and release is brutal, a hard read but important none the less. The rest of the book, the intro, background, and wanderlust, don’t really need to be there and they feel two dimensional and almost hampered my enjoyment. With two writers I expected that portion to be better.
A decent read but not one I would put at the top of my recommendation list. ( )
  SadieRuin | Nov 24, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 44 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Amanda Lindhoutprimary authorall editionscalculated
Corbett, Saramain authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
In the burned house I am eating breakfast. You understand: there is no house, there is no breakfast, yet here I am.

- Margaret Atwood, from "Morning in the Burned House"
Dedication
For my mom and two dads & Katherine Porterfield
First words
Prologue --- We named the houses they put us in.
When I was a girl, I trusted what I knew about the world.
Quotations
I'd like to say that I hesitated before heading into Somali, but I didn't. If anything, my experiences had taught me that while terror and strife hogged the international headlines, there was always, --- really, truly always ---- something more hopeful and humane running along-side it. In every country, in every city, on every block, you'd find parents who loved their kids, neighbors who looked after one another, children ready to play. Surely, I thought, I'd find stories worth telling.
With this breath, I choose peace. With ths breath, I choose freedom.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

"The spectacularly dramatic memoir of a woman whose curiosity about the world led her from rural Canada to imperiled and dangerous countries on every continent, and then into fifteen months of harrowing captivity in Somalia--a story of courage, resilience, and extraordinary grace.At the age of eighteen, Amanda Lindhout moved from her hardscrabble Alberta hometown to the big city--Calgary--and worked as a cocktail waitress, saving her tips so she could travel the globe. As a child, she escaped a violent household by paging through National Geographic and imagining herself in its exotic locales. Now she would see those places for real. She backpacked through Latin America, Laos, Bangladesh, and India, and emboldened by each experience, went on to travel solo across Sudan, Syria, and Pakistan. In war-ridden Afghanistan and Iraq she carved out a fledgling career as a TV reporter. And then, in August 2008, she traveled to Mogadishu, Somalia--"the most dangerous place on earth"--to report on the fighting there. On her fourth day in the country, she and her photojournalist companion were abducted. An astoundingly intimate and harrowing account of Lindhout's fifteen months as a captive, A House in the Sky illuminates the psychology, motivations, and desperate extremism of her young guards and the men in charge of them. She is kept in chains, nearly starved, and subjected to unthinkable abuse. She survives by imagining herself in a "house in the sky," looking down at the woman shackled below, and finding strength and hope in the power of her own mind. Lindhout's decision, upon her release, to counter the violence she endured by founding an organization to help the Somali people rebuild their country through education is a wrenching testament to the capacity of the human spirit and an astonishing portrait of the power of compassion and forgiveness"--"The spectacularly dramatic and redemptive memoir of a woman whose curiosity about the world led her to the world's most imperiled and perilous countries, and then into fifteen months of harrowing captivity--a beautifully written story of courage, resilience, and grace. At the age of eighteen, Amanda Lindhout moved from her hardscrabble hometown to the big city and worked as a cocktail waitress, saving her tips so she could travel the globe. Aspiring to understand the world and live a significant life, she backpacked through Latin America, Laos, Bangladesh, and India, and went on to Sudan, Syria, and Pakistan. In war-ridden Afghanistan and Iraq she carved out a fledgling career as a reporter. And then, in August 2008, she traveled to Somalia--"the most dangerous place on earth"--to report on the fighting there. On her fourth day in the country, she and her photojournalist companion were abducted. A House in the Sky illuminates the psychology, motivations, and desperate extremism of Lindhout's young guards and the men in charge of them. She is kept in chains, nearly starved, and subjected to horrific abuse. She survives by imagining herself in a "house in the sky," finding strength and hope in the power of her own mind. Lindhout's decision to counter the violence she endured by founding an organization to help educate Somali people women is a moving testament to the power of compassion and forgiveness"--… (more)

» see all 5 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.15)
0.5
1
1.5
2 5
2.5 2
3 22
3.5 17
4 78
4.5 16
5 66

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 132,594,262 books! | Top bar: Always visible