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The Real Lincoln: a New Look at Abraham…
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The Real Lincoln: a New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an… (2002)

by Thomas J. DiLorenzo

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This is one of the best history books I have ever read. ( )
  MarcMarcMarc | Mar 24, 2013 |
This well reseached and documented book helps to get through the hype of Lincoln as God to the factual Lincoln as man material. What did he say, what did he write, what did he actually believe is often quite different than the legend that has arisen around him. Despite personal prejudices of readers, all that admire or despise Lincoln should read this book so that they have a more even and rounded sense of the society in which he lived shaping the things he believed, did, and said. The man is far more interesting than the myth, and perhaps more falliable. Like most people that were made into popular legends, the legend often lost sight of the real person. ( )
  GatorUA | Dec 6, 2010 |
This analytical study questions the motives and practices of the legendary and somewhat mythical president. Reading this volume caused this Illinois son to reconsider many of my opinions. The book brought to mind that powerful leaders often dominate the media and public opinion; their influence and supporters can often "rewrite history." Read more at a World Net Daily article http://www.wnd.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=27225 (lj) ( )
  eduscapes | Apr 22, 2010 |
Apart from a few parts where I didn't agree with the author as to how "obvious" his conclusions were, I found the book to be a very well-written and well-thought-out case against Lincoln's near-godhead in the American pantheon.

Unfortunately, as more people read this book, undoubtedly more people will begin to condescendingly argue that Lincoln was in fact some sort of devil. And to say that he did no good is just as blind as to say that he did only good. I might've liked to have that touched upon in the book -- but then, I do understand that the book is primarily an attack on the Lincoln god-figure, rather than a fair portrayal of the man. That can come later. ( )
  bluedream | Feb 27, 2009 |
Excellent, well-documented, thorough treatment of a very unpopular subject - the destruction by Abraham Lincoln of America as a federal republic. The author goes about a hundred pages too far, sometimes less is more, but nevertheless the evidence exists everywhere you look today.

Probably the sum total of the book can be summed up by a quote that appears on page 278, attributed to abolitionist Lysander Spooner,

All these cries of having "abolished slavery," of having "saved the country," of having "preserved the union," of establishing a "government of consent," and of "maintaining the national honor" are all gross, shameless, transparent cheats - so transparent that they ought to deceive no one. ( )
  5hrdrive | Jan 6, 2009 |
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More words have probably been written about Abraham Lincoln than about any other American political figure.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0761526463, Paperback)

A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War
Most Americans consider Abraham Lincoln to be the greatest president in history. His legend as the Great Emancipator has grown to mythic proportions as hundreds of books, a national holiday, and a monument in Washington, D.C., extol his heroism and martyrdom. But what if most everything you knew about Lincoln were false? What if, instead of an American hero who sought to free the slaves, Lincoln were in fact a calculating politician who waged the bloodiest war in american history in order to build an empire that rivaled Great Britain's? In The Real Lincoln, author Thomas J. DiLorenzo uncovers a side of Lincoln not told in many history books and overshadowed by the immense Lincoln legend.
Through extensive research and meticulous documentation, DiLorenzo portrays the sixteenth president as a man who devoted his political career to revolutionizing the American form of government from one that was very limited in scope and highly decentralized—as the Founding Fathers intended—to a highly centralized, activist state. Standing in his way, however, was the South, with its independent states, its resistance to the national government, and its reliance on unfettered free trade. To accomplish his goals, Lincoln subverted the Constitution, trampled states' rights, and launched a devastating Civil War, whose wounds haunt us still. According to this provacative book, 600,000 American soldiers did not die for the honorable cause of ending slavery but for the dubious agenda of sacrificing the independence of the states to the supremacy of the federal government, which has been tightening its vise grip on our republic to this very day.
You will discover a side of Lincoln that you were probably never taught in school—a side that calls into question the very myths that surround him and helps explain the true origins of a bloody, and perhaps, unnecessary war.

"A devastating critique of America's most famous president."
Joseph Sobran, commentator and nationally syndicated columnist

"Today's federal government is considerably at odds with that envisioned by the framers of the Constitution. Thomas J. DiLorenzo gives an account of How this come about in The Real Lincoln."
Walter E. Williams, from the foreword

"A peacefully negotiated secession was the best way to handle all the problems facing Americans in 1860. A war of coercion was Lincoln's creation. It sometimes takes a century or more to bring an important historical event into perspective. This study does just that and leaves the reader asking, 'Why didn't we know this before?'"
Donald Livingston, professor of philosophy, Emory University

"Professor DiLorenzo has penetrated to the very heart and core of American history with a laser beam of fact and analysis."
Clyde Wilson, professor of history, University of South Carolina, and editor, The John C. Calhoun Papers


From the Hardcover edition.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:27:15 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

The legend of Abraham Lincoln as the Great Emancipator has grown to mythic proportions. But what if almost everything you knew about Lincoln were false? What if, instead of an American hero who sought to free the slaves, Lincoln were in fact a calculating politician who waged the bloodiest war in American history in order to build an empire? Here, through extensive research and meticulous documentation, DiLorenzo portrays Lincoln as a man who devoted his political career to revolutionizing the American form of government from one that was limited in scope and highly decentralized--as the Founding Fathers intended--to a highly centralized, activist state. Standing in his way, however, was the South, with its independent states, its resistance to the national government, and its reliance on unfettered free trade. To accomplish his goals, Lincoln subverted the Constitution, trampled states' rights, and launched a devastating Civil War, whose wounds haunt us still.--From publisher description.… (more)

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