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Glitter and Glue: A Memoir by Kelly Corrigan
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Glitter and Glue: A Memoir

by Kelly Corrigan

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1704069,943 (3.9)8
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This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
An enjoyable memoir about a young woman learning to appreciate her mother while she is a nanny for 2 young children grieving their mother's death. I appreciate that the book didn't end with her going back to her mother and telling her how much she meant to her. I would have liked the second part of the book where she is a mother herself to be a little more fleshed out to learn whether or not she learned to be both the glitter and the glue for her children. ( )
  julko | Nov 11, 2014 |
I'll read just about anything that Kelly Corrigan writes. Fun book. ( )
  Suzieqkc | Nov 3, 2014 |
A great book for both mothers and daughters. ( )
  asomers | Jul 13, 2014 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Corrigan, eager to escape the restricting confines of her mother and to explore the world, travels to Australia and takes a job as a nanny of a family broken-down after the death of their mother. Corrigan quickly learns how right her mother might be as she attempts to guide the Tanner family through their loss. I particularly enjoyed her account of her relationship with her mother as I could definitely relate. ( )
  DFED | Apr 11, 2014 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I requested this book as an ER knowing it would probably be a hard read for me. It's a book about motherhood and because my mother died when I was ten I sometimes feel like I don't have the understanding to really appreciate these kind of books. They sometimes make me sad or jealous or some other strange mix of emotions. And so, I avoided this one for months. It sat on my nightstand long after it was actually published and no longer really an ARC.

I finished it in a day.

I couldn't help myself. I grew to love the author. She switches back and forth between herself as a young adult in her early twenties to the mother she is today. In her twenties, in the 90s, she moved to Australia for a time and became a nanny to a family who had just lost their mother. The two young children, Martin and Millie, are reeling from their loss. The father works and isn't quite sure how to keep his family moving forward. Kelly, whose relationship with her own mother is complicated, learns to think about motherhood in a while new light.

I ached for the two children who were similar in age to my brother and I who lost our mother so young. I understood Millie's hostility towards her nanny because I had done the same thing to mine. It felt disloyal to let another woman into our lives when all I wanted was a mother. The book is beautifully written and made me cry, but in a way that felt okay. ( )
1 vote RosyLibrarian | Apr 11, 2014 |
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Book description
From the New York Times bestselling author of The Middle Place comes a new memoir that examines the bond—sometimes nourishing, sometimes exasperating, occasionally divine—between mothers and daughters.

When Kelly Corrigan was in high school, her mother neatly summarized the family dynamic as “Your father’s the glitter but I’m the glue.” This meant nothing to Kelly, who left childhood sure that her mom—with her inviolable commandments and proud stoicism—would be nothing more than background chatter for the rest of Kelly’s life, which she was carefully orienting toward adventure. After college, armed with a backpack, her personal mission statement, and a wad of traveler’s checks, she took off for Australia to see things and do things and Become Interesting.

But it didn’t turn out the way she pictured it. In a matter of months, her fanny pack full of savings had dwindled and she realized she needed a job. That’s how Kelly met John Tanner, a newly widowed father of two looking for a live-in nanny. They chatted for an hour, discussed timing and pay, and a week later, Kelly moved in. And there, in that house in a suburb north of Sydney, her mother’s voice was suddenly everywhere, nudging and advising, cautioning and directing, escorting her through a terrain as foreign as any she had ever trekked. Every day she spent with the Tanner kids was a day spent reconsidering her relationship with her mother, turning it over in her hands like a shell, straining to hear whatever messages might be trapped in its spiral.

This is a book about the difference between travel and life experience, stepping out and stepping up, fathers and mothers. But mostly it’s about who you admire and why, and how that changes over time.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 034553283X, Hardcover)

From the New York Times bestselling author of The Middle Place comes a new memoir that examines the bond—sometimes nourishing, sometimes exasperating, occasionally divine—between mothers and daughters.
 
When Kelly Corrigan was in high school, her mother neatly summarized the family dynamic as “Your father’s the glitter but I’m the glue.” This meant nothing to Kelly, who left childhood sure that her mom—with her inviolable commandments and proud stoicism—would be nothing more than background chatter for the rest of Kelly’s life, which she was carefully orienting toward adventure. After college, armed with a backpack, her personal mission statement, and a wad of traveler’s checks, she took off for Australia to see things and do things and Become Interesting.
 
But it didn’t turn out the way she pictured it. In a matter of months, her fanny pack full of savings had dwindled and she realized she needed a job. That’s how Kelly met John Tanner, a newly widowed father of two looking for a live-in nanny. They chatted for an hour, discussed timing and pay, and a week later, Kelly moved in. And there, in that house in a suburb north of Sydney, her mother’s voice was suddenly everywhere, nudging and advising, cautioning and directing, escorting her through a terrain as foreign as any she had ever trekked. Every day she spent with the Tanner kids was a day spent reconsidering her relationship with her mother, turning it over in her hands like a shell, straining to hear whatever messages might be trapped in its spiral.
 
This is a book about the difference between travel and life experience, stepping out and stepping up, fathers and mothers. But mostly it’s about who you admire and why, and how that changes over time.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:38:00 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

"One of the things you should know about Kelly Corrigan is that she is the daughter of Mary Corrigan, a woman of conviction and grit who taught her kids that No Means No and Actions Speak Louder than Words and if they wanted a bunch of Rah Rah Lovey Dovey, go talk to your father--so Kelly did, over and over again, exiting her childhood with the sense that she'd always have more shared ground with him. But when she arrived in Australia in the summer of 1992, the only job she could find was as a nanny. She thought she was signing up for carpools and babysitting and some light cooking, but what she walked into instead was a household still reeling with grief from the recent loss of the mother. Completely unprepared, Kelly spent five months trying to help the Tanner family pick up the pieces. And to her surprise, she found herself quietly deferring to the wisdom of Mary Corrigan, who once told the young Kelly that her charming father "may be the glitter, but I'm the glue," a pattern that would become more pronounced years later, when Kelly's own daughters were born, and it turned out that each and every day demanded her mother's signature conviction and grit. This is a story about growing up and stepping up, but most of all, it's about the great adventure of motherhood"--… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

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