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Glitter and Glue: A Memoir by Kelly Corrigan
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Glitter and Glue: A Memoir

by Kelly Corrigan

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After college, Kelly Corrigan packed up for a whirlwind trip around the world with her best friend. They planned to have life experiences and learn things that couldn't be learned at home. What they didn't plan on was burning through all of their money so quickly. After unsuccessfully attempting to get a job as a waitress or bartender, Kelly took a job as a nanny to a family that had recently lost their mother. And there, in that suburban Australian home, Kelly suddenly understood her mother's formerly inexplicable practicality.

I wouldn't have appreciated this book if I'd read it a few years ago. When I was living at home, rolling my eyes at my mom and ignoring everything she said, the words would have been lost on me. But now that I'm living a thousand miles away from her, making my own decisions and maintaining my own household, I value everything she has to say. I look forward to our weekly conversations. I bounce all my ideas off of her, from how to deal with people at work to what order I should tackle the spring cleaning. Now that I don't see my mother with any regularity, I appreciate her more than ever before. And that means that I appreciated Glitter and Glue and Kelly's evolving relationship with her mother all the more.

I don't really have anything else to say about this book other than to recommend it to anyone who is a mom or has a mom. I know I'll be recommending it to my mom.

Full disclosure: I received a free advance copy of Glitter and Glue in exchange for an honest review. ( )
  Sara.Newhouse | Feb 11, 2016 |
A memoir that focuses on a young woman travelling abroad but takes a job as a nanny in Australia to save more money for her travels. While caring for the motherless children she begins to realize that there are many layers that make up the woman who is her mother. Her mother wasnt the doting affectionate type and the author longed for something more.
  micahmom2002 | Jan 25, 2016 |
A memoir that focuses on a young woman travelling abroad but takes a job as a nanny in Australia to save more money for her travels. While caring for the motherless children she begins to realize that there are many layers that make up the woman who is her mother. Her mother wasnt the doting affectionate type and the author longed for something more.
  micahmom2002 | Jan 25, 2016 |
A very engaging memoir focused on a woman's evolving relationship with her mother, from childhood to when she's raising children of her own. I listened to the audio book read by the author, and her rendition of her mother's dialogue is laugh-out-loud funny. Very enjoyable. ( )
  Gingermama | Jan 24, 2016 |
I loved the author's writing style, This is an extended appreciation of the author's mother and what being a mother has meant to the author. I found her style quite thought provoking in that the author seems to reveal so much truth in her understanding of herself and her mother.
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The title is based on her mother describing how she and her husband fit together. He is the glitter and she is the glue. Isn't that a clever appreciation of what two people can do together. Glitter is charming but without glue it will not stay present for long. Her father will always have the easy word to say, the uninformed assurance that everything will work out okay, while her mother will track down the hard facts and make the difficult decisions.

I recommend this confessional memoir to anyone who understands or wishes they understood their mother. ( )
  joeydag | Jul 23, 2015 |
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Epigraph
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For the yearbook, the fifth-graders at Havens Elementary are asked to name the one person they most admire. Finley Swan said, "My mom!" So did that sweet Madeline Malan. My daughter put "Tom Brady." The football player.

This one's for you, Ma. Long overdue.
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When I was growing up, my mom was guided by the strong belief that to befriend me was to deny me the one thing a kid really needed to survive childhood: a mother.
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Book description
From the New York Times bestselling author of The Middle Place comes a new memoir that examines the bond—sometimes nourishing, sometimes exasperating, occasionally divine—between mothers and daughters.

When Kelly Corrigan was in high school, her mother neatly summarized the family dynamic as “Your father’s the glitter but I’m the glue.” This meant nothing to Kelly, who left childhood sure that her mom—with her inviolable commandments and proud stoicism—would be nothing more than background chatter for the rest of Kelly’s life, which she was carefully orienting toward adventure. After college, armed with a backpack, her personal mission statement, and a wad of traveler’s checks, she took off for Australia to see things and do things and Become Interesting.

But it didn’t turn out the way she pictured it. In a matter of months, her fanny pack full of savings had dwindled and she realized she needed a job. That’s how Kelly met John Tanner, a newly widowed father of two looking for a live-in nanny. They chatted for an hour, discussed timing and pay, and a week later, Kelly moved in. And there, in that house in a suburb north of Sydney, her mother’s voice was suddenly everywhere, nudging and advising, cautioning and directing, escorting her through a terrain as foreign as any she had ever trekked. Every day she spent with the Tanner kids was a day spent reconsidering her relationship with her mother, turning it over in her hands like a shell, straining to hear whatever messages might be trapped in its spiral.

This is a book about the difference between travel and life experience, stepping out and stepping up, fathers and mothers. But mostly it’s about who you admire and why, and how that changes over time.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 034553283X, Hardcover)

From the New York Times bestselling author of The Middle Place comes a new memoir that examines the bond—sometimes nourishing, sometimes exasperating, occasionally divine—between mothers and daughters.
 
When Kelly Corrigan was in high school, her mother neatly summarized the family dynamic as “Your father’s the glitter but I’m the glue.” This meant nothing to Kelly, who left childhood sure that her mom—with her inviolable commandments and proud stoicism—would be nothing more than background chatter for the rest of Kelly’s life, which she was carefully orienting toward adventure. After college, armed with a backpack, her personal mission statement, and a wad of traveler’s checks, she took off for Australia to see things and do things and Become Interesting.
 
But it didn’t turn out the way she pictured it. In a matter of months, her fanny pack full of savings had dwindled and she realized she needed a job. That’s how Kelly met John Tanner, a newly widowed father of two looking for a live-in nanny. They chatted for an hour, discussed timing and pay, and a week later, Kelly moved in. And there, in that house in a suburb north of Sydney, her mother’s voice was suddenly everywhere, nudging and advising, cautioning and directing, escorting her through a terrain as foreign as any she had ever trekked. Every day she spent with the Tanner kids was a day spent reconsidering her relationship with her mother, turning it over in her hands like a shell, straining to hear whatever messages might be trapped in its spiral.
 
This is a book about the difference between travel and life experience, stepping out and stepping up, fathers and mothers. But mostly it’s about who you admire and why, and how that changes over time.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:14:07 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

"One of the things you should know about Kelly Corrigan is that she is the daughter of Mary Corrigan, a woman of conviction and grit who taught her kids that No Means No and Actions Speak Louder than Words and if they wanted a bunch of Rah Rah Lovey Dovey, go talk to your father--so Kelly did, over and over again, exiting her childhood with the sense that she'd always have more shared ground with him. But when she arrived in Australia in the summer of 1992, the only job she could find was as a nanny. She thought she was signing up for carpools and babysitting and some light cooking, but what she walked into instead was a household still reeling with grief from the recent loss of the mother. Completely unprepared, Kelly spent five months trying to help the Tanner family pick up the pieces. And to her surprise, she found herself quietly deferring to the wisdom of Mary Corrigan, who once told the young Kelly that her charming father "may be the glitter, but I'm the glue," a pattern that would become more pronounced years later, when Kelly's own daughters were born, and it turned out that each and every day demanded her mother's signature conviction and grit. This is a story about growing up and stepping up, but most of all, it's about the great adventure of motherhood"--… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

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