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The Pioneer Detectives: Did a distant…
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The Pioneer Detectives: Did a distant spacecraft prove Einstein and Newton…

by Konstantin Kakaes

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Fun little Kindle Single. A geek detective story. The Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft, the first spacecraft to visit Jupiter and Saturn now headed for the star Aldebaran that it will reach in 2 million years (if the Klingons don't blow it away first), began exhibiting some anomalous distance and velocity readings. For over a decade a few intrepid scientists at JPL, Ames Research Center, and a few volunteers worked to track down the source. With some hoping this might herald a flaw in Einstein's theory of relativity, and possibly new insight into gravitational theory, they finally figured it out. I won't spoil it here, but the fun in this is not the destination, but the journey. Well written and quite worth an hour or two of your time! ( )
  mybucketlistofbooks | Jan 9, 2015 |
Highly technical discussion of the "Pioneer Anomaly"...an acceleration delta of Pioneer satellites. Read it only if you're a space-geek. ( )
  buffalogr | Oct 29, 2013 |
Highly technical discussion of the "Pioneer Anomaly"...an acceleration delta of Pioneer satellites. Read it only if you're a space-geek. ( )
  buffalogr | Oct 15, 2013 |
Neat little book, crisply written, easy to consume and enjoy in one sitting. I've always been fascinated by the Voyager story, Carl Sagan's Murmurs of Earth is treasured. The Pioneer craft who led the way for deep space travel, becoming the first man-made objects to exit the solar system, arent as well-known as Voyager, but their story is no less fascinating. Kakaes weaves their epic journey outward bound from earth to the stars into a scientific detective story about the "Pioneer Anomaly", a phenomenon that for a time threatened to overturn Newtonian and Einsteinian physics. No heavy science in here, it is easily understandable by the layman and moves swiftly without bogging down. Excellent quick read. ( )
2 vote drmaf | Sep 29, 2013 |
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Explore one of the greatest scientific mysteries of our time, the Pioneer Anomaly: in the 1980s, NASA scientists detected an unknown force acting on the spacecraft Pioneer 10, the first man-made object to journey through the asteroid belt and study Jupiter, eventually leaving the solar system. No one seemed able to agree on a cause. (Dark matter? Tensor–vector–scalar gravity? Collisions with gravitons?) What did seem clear to those who became obsessed with it was that the Pioneer Anomaly had the potential to upend Einstein and Newton—to change everything we know about the universe.

With riveting prose and the precision of an expert, Konstantin Kakaes gives us a scientific police procedural, tracking the steps of those who sought to unravel this high-stakes enigma. His thrilling account draws on extensive interviews and archival research, following the story from the Anomaly’s initial discovery, through decades of tireless investigation, to its ultimate conclusion. “The Pioneer Detectives” is a definitive account not just of the Pioneer Anomaly but of how scientific knowledge gets made and unmade, with scientists sometimes putting their livelihoods on the line in pursuit of cosmic truth. Perfect for fans of John McPhee, Thomas Kuhn, and Ed McBain, this is also an immensely enjoyable story accessible to anyone who loves brilliant, fascinating long-form journalism.

[retrieved 8/24/2013 from Amazon.com]
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