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Love, Technically by Lynne Silver
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Love, Technically

by Lynne Silver

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Review Posted on HarlequinJunkie.com

Michelle Kolson is just starting to adjust to the big city. She’s got a decent job that she’s good at and her head is above water – defying her family who assume she’ll be back home in no-time. Noah Frellish…Read More ( )
  Aleveria | Jan 12, 2017 |
Reviewed by Kim
for Read Your Writes Book Reviews

I loved the premise of this book. There’s just something really great about truly falling in love with someone for them as a person and not for the size of their bank account.

Michelle Kolson is working late one night during her first week at LiteWave Tech. She thinks she’s alone on the floor and is having printer problems. In fact, she even kicks the printer and is surprised to hear the voice of a tall, handsome, geeky looking guy approaching her. Since he helps her and reminds her that the help desk is always on call, Michelle thinks Sark works for the help desk.

Sark, known to his friends, is really Noah Frellish, the billionaire CEO who actually founded and created LiteWave Tech. Noah realizes that Michelle doesn’t know who he really is and decides he will tell her the truth the next day. Well....He kind of sort of does, but she doesn’t realize it.

Love, Technically is a romance for starry eyed romance lovers everywhere. You get to watch two people fall in love with each other and come to terms with who they are and what they really want out of life.

Noah is just an average guy who even though he has tons of money, doesn’t show it. Michelle is a small town girl who wants to live in the big city. She doesn’t have a college degree but she’s a fast learner and a hard worker. What these two can accomplish together is what friendship and love is all about.

I was hooked from the beginning and I enjoyed the book to the very end. Noah and Michelle are two characters you will fall in love with.

Source: Publisher ( )
  ReadYourWrites | Aug 12, 2013 |
This was a romance story about Michelle and Sark. Michelle just recently moved to Chicago and started a new job at LiteWave. She was working late one night and was having trouble with her printer and Sark came to her rescue. She thought he was from the IT Department but unbeknownst to her, he was actually Noah, the CEO of the company. He knew he should tell her the truth but he was tired of people liking him because of his money instead of just for himself. Their attraction was mutual and a romance started.

I really did not like how Michelle was portrayed as a country hick. She saw the billboard of Noah and still didn’t put it together that Sark was the CEO. Then Sark sent her a note explaining who he really was and she misunderstands the note. I was mad at Sark that he thought he could explain his deception in a note and then never talk about it with her in person. Once she found out who he really was, she felt betrayed and left her job, running home to Iowa. Sark followed her and they get their happily ever after. Cute story but not enough substance for me.

Rating-3

Reviewed by Donna McClaugherty

Courtesy of My Book Addiction and More ( )
  MyBookAddiction | Aug 6, 2013 |
Love, Technically is a quick read—just over 125 pages—and cute, providing the reader is okay with some major suspension of belief. At first Michelle's mistake makes sense—Noah gives her his gamer nickname, because he thought she was cute and wanted her "to be in the small circle of people to call him Sark." He's wearing casual clothes and a baseball cap, and his older "geeky" glasses since he broke his more stylish ones on a recent bike ride. He looks nothing like the polished publicity photos she'd seen around the building. It's late, there's no one else still working on her floor, he's wearing a seriously nerdy (but amusing) t-shirt, and he does "fix" the problem she's having with her printer.

Soon, though, it gets a little silly. She sees him many times in a more normal work environment, but never makes the connection. Then Noah decides he has to tell her the truth, but does so in pretty much the most bizarre and obscure way possible—and she totally doesn't get it. Then for a big chunk of the novella he thinks she knows who he is but she totally doesn't. They spend a lot of time together—how does she not make the connection a single time? He does talk about work and is even often driven around in a company car. Every single other employee knows him. Just not the new girl, apparently.

Still, there were a lot of cute moments in the story...along with M&Ms and a Mork & Mindy reference. Both Michelle and Noah find solutions for their work woes (going public and having to answer to a board of directors has taken his company in directions he's not comfortable with), and she does make him grovel just a little to get her back in the end.

In a nutshell: Short and sweet; though not entirely believable, it does have its moments. 3 stars.

I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. ( )
  beckymmoe | Jul 29, 2013 |
“Love, Technically” is a “Geek Novella” written by Lynne Silver and will be published by Entangled Publishing in another week (7/29/13). This is a 95 page quick read of a feel-good romance where the small-town girl comes to the big city & meets the boy… who is actually the CEO of the company where she works… and lots of miscommunication ensues. He tells her who he is but she misunderstands… and when it finally comes to light, well, you’ll find out all about it once YOU read “Love, Technically”!

This is a great beach read, but be aware – there are also some rather “deep” subtexts dealing with issues like call centers being outsourced overseas; the value of a college degree versus work experience; and how the Business of business typically stifles creativity in the workplace. It is a self-proclaimed “geek novella” – so yes, there is some “geek speak” (along with a shout-out to ThinkGeek – I was sold on the book at that point LOL!) but nothing that a “non-geek” can’t understand… or skip over while pretending to understand it. (You know who you are.) ( )
  SnarkyMom | Jul 21, 2013 |
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